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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, August 02, 1908, NEWS SECTION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99021999/1908-08-02/ed-1/seq-8/

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TTJE OMArTA' SUNDAY BET!:' 'AUGUST 2.YD0S:
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Two Immense Bargain Squares Piled High With
EMBROIDERIES
WORTH UP TO 35c, at 10c and 19c Yd.
15 and 18-inch fine nainsook and cambric flouncinp,
skirtings and corset cover embroideries, also fine wide
edges and insertions, new
shadow and blind eflects
worth up to 35c a yard
on two big bargain
squares at, yara.
AH Over Embroideries
Fine cambric and nainsook neat eyelet, shadow, ring
and dot effects worth up to 40c a yard,
20c Val. Laces
Fine French, German and filet
a large variety of pretty new
to match also fine Torchons,
Cluny and filet curtain laces;
EMBROIDERED ROBES Partly Made at $4.98.
Fine French batiste, hand embroidered in elegant floral
designs, also fine Swiss embroidered with insertions and
inserted medallions of Irish crochet worth (t 4 CIQ
up to $12.50, at ? vpFlJ
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ononoaonononoaononononononouononoaono
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In Our White Goods Section. Baam'nl, Monday
ST. GALL EMBROIDERED SWISSES, 39c YD.
A startling bargain for Monday. All our regular 50c,
59c and 69c embroidered, dotted and figured white St.
Gall Swisses no other fabric has main
tained and held such popularity choice
one day only, Monday, yard
Ask for No. 999 English long cloth
rpffular 11.25 value will be
aold Monday, at,
per bolt
75c
In Our Wants Gooda Section, Basement
12ic, 15c and 18c Wash Fabrics at lie Yd.
Tub Voiles, all colors, side band batistes, embroidered
voiles, fine batistes, Egyptian and lisle tis- "1 1
sues, at yard fil
Several shades linen finish suitings always sells at C
12 c yard, from the bolt, at, yard
onononononc
CON MEN USE OMAHA NAMES
"Sotel Man Fleeced in Boston by Fake
Capitalists.
HOW THE GAME WAS W0EKED
A Easy Mark with Money Aaxloaa to
Msvko Mora Relieved of His Roll
by av Sporty Propo
sition. . Occasionally when a gold brick is worked
on a western man the raccuous laugh
which follows is intended to convey the
Impression that the newer settled section
possess a monopoly of easy marks. This
Is the eastern Idea. It Is cultivated as a
means of diverting attention from the crop
of gudgeoua, which flourishes the AtlanttJ
and conttquous territory as luxuriantly as
alfalfa In Nebraska. The latest large
specimen of the class la Frederick Holi
nan, hotel keeper of Scranton, Pa., who
Is now In New York squealing for the re
covery of 115,000 of which he was stripped
by a raw game played in Boston, the
principal lure of the con men being bogus
"capitalists," who assumed the names of
Omaha men.
The story as told by the New York World
begins with one, Charles Weber, who
registered at Holsrogen's hotel, occupied
the beet rooms In the house, spent money
freely, and was soon rubbing elbows with
"mine host." Landlord Holsnagen told
Weber of some valuable timber lands In
. Tennessee upon which he held an option.
Weber replied that he had a friend In
New York named Lsuie who was also In
terested In Tennessee timber properties
and who was organising a syndicate of
capitalists to develop them. Weber volun
teered to come to New York with Holi
nagen and Introduce him to I-ane.
They met Lane at one of the big
' hotels here, and after a business-like talk
. ha consented to Introduce the Scranton
' man to his millionaire backers with a view
to promoting their Interests jointly.
"Nearly all the men In our syndicate
are off on their yachts or traveling
t broad for the summer," said Lane,
"but two of them, old man Cudahy and
his son, the millionaire -ackers, of
Omaha, are on their way east In their
private car, and should be In Bridge
port, Conn., tomorrow. If you like
we'll take a run up there in the morn
' lug and lay the matter before them."
Meets HI 'Barkers."
The following, day. In Bridgeport. Lane
Introduced Holsnagen to his wealthy back
ers. The elder was a stout, dignified, full
bearded man, apparently past W years of
age, while the younger was a well-set-up
chap of medium height, who continually
addressed the elder as "governor." The
meeting took place In a hotel near the rail-
way station, and while the Tennessee tim
ber proposition was being discussed over
an excellent luncheon. It developed that the
private cor In which the Cudahys traveled
had been sent to the shops for repairs, but
would be In commission again before the
day was over.
The westerners seemed favorably Im
pressed wHh the timber proposition and
promised to tske it under consideration
and make the necessary Investigations at
oaoe through their southern representatives.
Over the coffee and the cigars the old man
became confidential
-The fact la." he said, "that the boy and
I have come east here for a little sport.
We've brought along with us a clever Uttle
fighter named Sullivan, who has licked
every tiling of his weight west of the Mis
sissippi river, and we're satisfied he can't
bo beat Mr. Lane has kindly consented to
make a mairh fgr us with a Boston lad
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designs in eyelet, Japanese,
Japanese,
9c
fl a
I j II I j jf n
Jj J
at 5c a. Yard
Val. laces and insertions
designs many
Point de Paris,
worth to 20c, yd..
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Ul ?JL VY AAA 1G KJlim
39c
40-lnch wide White Victoria
La wni off the bolt, Monday,
yard,
at
..lie
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DRANDEEIS pnonoooaono
and we're going to pull oft the fight
privately In Boston tonight. If you care
to see the fun you're welcome to come
along."
Holsnagen Jumped at the chance. He
argued that it would help him to a better
acquaintance. Lane congratulated him,
aside, on having won the old man's con
fidence so easily. The latter invited them
to make the trip on his private car, but
Lane said he would have to go ahead to
make final arrangements and Holsnagen
decided to go with Lane.
"I wanted to write you In the beginning,"
said Lane when they were alone, "but I
was afraid the old man wouldn't like It.
We're going to have the fight In the private
house of one of the biggest bankers In the
Back Bay section, and It would play the
deuce If the newspapers or ths police got
onto It. We've got a fighter named Col
Una that'll put It all over the western lad
without trying. We've been framing up
this little game for weeks and It's such a
sure thing that I've put up $10,000 on it.
If you've got a few thousand to put up you
can't lose, and a stiff bet would make you
solid with the old man."
Taklnar the Bait.
Through a Bridgeport bank Holsnagen
drew a draft for 16,000 on his Scranton
bankers and turned the cash over to Lane
to bot for him. At 10 o'clock that same
evening they took a cab In Boston, and
after half an hour's drive pulled up before
a mansion In a residence section of the
town. The front of the house was dark,
but when they mounted the steps and
pressed ths electric button the door was
opened by a footman In livery and they
were ushered Into a large rear room off
the main hall. It was fitted up as a
library, but the furniture waa all pushed
back to the sides of the room, leaving
an open space in the center for the
fighters.
There were four men in the room be
sides the two westerners, and after Hols
nagen had been Introduced all. around two
your.g men In fighting costume, wearing
two-ounce gloves, were admitted. One of
the strangers was selected as stakeholder
and several bets were put up In his hands
by the side of which Holsns gen's 15,000
seemed rather small. The old westerner
snd his son stood to win or lose J130,0O)
when time was called.
In the first three rounds Collins had
the better of It. He came up fresh and
smiling for the fourth round and sellid
In hammer and tongs. The round had
been In progress about thirty seconds
when the western lad landed a rtuht swing
In the Boston boy's ribs whloh doubled
him up like a knife and left him writhing
In apparent agony on the floor. There
was a count of ten seconds and Sullivan
was declared the winner.
"I never saw a man feel so badly over
anything." said Holsnagen In relating the
affair, "as Lane did over losing that fight.
He seemed sorrier on my account than on
his own. We took young Collins away
with us In a cab. He explained that the
blow that knocked him out was delivered
by chance, and that he was caught
napping, because he waa overconfident and
believed he had his man whipped. He
said he could have put him out In the
second round, only he wsnted to give Oie
'swell guys,' as he called them, a run for
their money.
Beta SIO.OOO More.
"There was a lot of talk all around the
next day and the outcome of It was that
Lane arranged another match between the
same lads with odds at S to 1 In our favor.
I drew another draft for $10,000 on my
bankers and put the money in Lane's hands
to wager. For some reason the fight was
postponed and when I looked for Lane
later I couldn't find him. I tried one
whole day to locate the house where the
fight waa pulled off but couldn't find It."
Holsnagen came back to New York and
put the matter in the hands of his attorney.
pi i KRWmm
The store tht has wen and maintained its leadership.
THE OREATKST STORK WIST OF CHICAGO.
Foremost in $tyh prestige. Fortmott in value-giving.
The tremendous energy of the men who conduct this store has accomplished la a few' years what no other store
In America ever achieved In such a short period.
Our powerful cash buying organization enables us to secure goods of highest character for much less
lar prices to the trade. Every man and woman In Omaha and vicinity can save money on every .dollar
goods that comes from Brandels. Every day extra special inducements are prepared.
The extraordinary bargains here are underprlced as only Brandels can underprice them.
YOU MUST COME TO BRANDEIS MONDAY TO GET THE ADVANTAGE OF THESE BARGAINS.
All our
AH the
to $40,
at
All Our Women's Smart
H? 5? CoPr)hKen
Braid Coats, at Vzro
Gingham Section, Monday
Just received another lot of
stylish new pink Scotch Cloths
washes splendidly, full yard
wide, only, a i
yard l?C
Muslin Section, Menday
Our Special Hotel 8heta, 75o
values, Monday 60c Most
serviceable all round quality
in the market, firm close
weave, all round
thread, at, each . ,
59c
who took ' him to police headquarters.
There be found that the men Introduced
to him as the Cudahys were Impostors.
From the rogues' gallery he picked out the
picture of old James Morgan, alias "Deafy"
Morris, as the man who had played the
part of the elder Cudahy, and Frederick
Gondolff as the man who had posed as
the millionaire's son.
BENDER STORY DISCREDITED
Those Who Worked oi the Case Deny
Chicago Alan's Revela
tion. . Cvery one In Parsons, Kan., who was
living near the Benders at the time of
discovery of their murders deny that the
Benders were lynched, and only one man
here ' remembers Oeorge Downer, who con
fessed to having been a member of the
vigilantes who lynched the Benders.
Ex-Senator George W. Gabriel, a physi
cian of this city, who knew the Benders
well, says that he remembers a man of the
name of Oeorge K. Downer, but that he
took nq active part In the search for the
Benders.
L. J. Beagle, now a capitalist of this city,
was then doputy sheriff of Neosho county,
and was In command of the posse that ac
companied Colonel York In the search for
his brother. Dr. York. Mr. Beagle says
that the Benders were never lynched. He
says that there was a large reward offered
for the Benders, dead or alive, and that
the man or men who killed the Benders
would not only have taken the reward,
but, with the egicltlment that was rife at
that time, would have been made he
roes of.
"Jim" Newberry, then marshal of Ft.
Scott; C. J. Peckham of Independence and
"Jim" Beers of Independence were em
ployed to trace the Benders, and Leroy
Dick was left in charge of the search at
the farm. Newberry kept in communica
tion with Dick and reported that, when
the Benders left their farm, they went to
Thayer in a wagon.
There they purchased four tickets for
Humboldt, and were seen there with the
hair trunk and the stump-tailed dog, the
latter being left there. They offered a
twenty-dollar bill for the tickets, but were
told that the station agent could not fur
nish the change, and later they produced
the change and got the four tickets for
Humboldt. At Humboldt Dick says the
party separated, John Bender and his sis
ter Kate taking the Missouri, Kansas A
Texas through Parsons for Dennlson,
Tex., to which point on the Red river
the Katy was then completed. There they
stayed two weeks and two days and then
disappeared, the general impression being
that they went to Mexico.
The old man and old woman went to
Lawrence, Kan., on the Banta Fe and there
bought tickets for St. Louts, where they
stayed two weeks with a sister of old man
Bender. Two weeks later, while the sister
of Bender was absent from tho house, the
two Benders disappeared and have never
since been seen or heard of.
The team and wagon In which the four
Benders went from their farm to Thayer
waa found a week after the Benders left
it there. The team was hitched to the rear
of the wagon and had eaten a large part
of the wagon box. The horses were nearly
starved to death when found. There were
several bullet holes In the wagon box and
blood waa found on the wagon. This led to
the suspicion that the Benders had been
killed In a fight with vigilantes, and this
was believed until It was proved that they
bad left Thayer for Humboldt. The lake
near which the team and wagon were
found was dragged, but nothing was
found. Kansas City Star.
Street ear advertising.
Omaha Hotel Supply Co.
moved from P4 Bo. 13th to rooms & to 0
U. 8, National bank bulldtn
cferpcee Women's Summer Apparel
We have grouped scores of the daintiest and airiest lingerie dresses,
in this season's most exquisite pastel shades and whites, charm
ingly trimmed and priced regularly at $12.50,
$15.00 and $17.50, all in one special group,
at, each
finest lingerie and eilk drettet and cottvmts
Women's Stunning
new 1908 models in flared and
pleated skirts, in the favorite styles
and fabrics, worth up to CP M faO
$10.00, at vT.IO
Tailored Suits and Silk
Our smart spring and
summer tailored suits,
have been selling at $65
Women's serge, broad
cloth, panama and silk
suits that have been
9 T v
.$25
selling at $25
. to $40, at. . .
and Practical Summer Coats
i io Vang Novelty Cloth sA
J and short 8Uk Coat,
Monday on
Basement Bargain
Squares
6 bales extra heavy unbleached
muslin, like Indian Head
in desirable lengths r
yard DC
Finest yard wide bleached mus
lins, cambrics and long
cloths remnants, yard . . . OC
Apron Gingham remnants will
be Bold while they "XI
last, at, yard L2C
ROMANTIC SIDE OF ASPHALT
Stuff With Wbioh Streets Arc Pared
Bich in History.
FORTUNES MADE AND UNMADE
Some Americans Enriched, Others Ir
peverUhed The Basis of an
International Compli
cation. Precious few people, walking on the
yielding surface of asphalt pavements In
midsummer, know that the material under
foot has a history as rich In romance
and wealth as the gold mlnos of the
west, surpassing tho latter in being the
cause of International complications. A
writer in the New York Times, relating
"The Lurid and Romantic Melodrama of
Asphalt," tells a moving story of fabulous
wealth gained by some Americans and the
impoverishment of millionaires who were
caught in the mess in Venesuela. The
writer says, in part:
The romance of asphalt is as wild a
melodrama as could be conceived. One
chapter tells how a penniless American
biscuit salesmsn obtained a grant as
Urge as the state of New York and In
cluding some of the richest land In the
world at that. In another chapter asphalt
paves the way for a South American
beauty to walk Into Paris as the bearer
of an ancient title and a queen of society.
Revolutions that coat 12,000 lives have a
place in the melodrama, and the latest
chapter ahows a country as large as Ger
many, France, Italy, the Netherlands,
Belgium, Swltxerland and Ireland pos
sessed of limitless resources, a mining
country, a forest country, a cattle coun
try, an agricultural country lying unde
veloped because of the compHcatlns of
the same romance.
And in an earthquako-proot house down
there in the tropics sits today a middle
aged, black-bearded man with a dash of
Indian blood, backed by a population of
less than 1,000,000 seals (even If all were
well disposed toward him) andl holding at
bay men with grievances from this coun
try, England, France, Italy, Holland and
one or two South American ststes. It
certainly Is a hornet's nest' down In Vene
suela. Castro's Responsibility.
Castro Is the men who today has to stand
the responsibility of the whole thing, but
he did not begin It. Even If he were all
hts most bitter enemies claim, no one man
couM In nine years have twisted and knot
ted things as they are twisted and knotted
sow in Venesuela. Tho romance began back
In President Guzman Blanco's day. Since
that time the complications have been so
many that It would seem as If another
Nibelungs Ring had been made of ssphalt
and cast Into the world to bring trouble
to anyone who came near it.
It al! started In 18S2. when an under-sised
man by ths name of Hamilton arrived In
Caracas to sell biscuits for an American
firm. He was no financier and history does
not even record that he wss a particularly
good biscuit seller, but he knew an adven
ture when he saw It and liked the taste of
It." Bo. circumstances favoring, Hamilton
started an endless chsin of queer events.
Gusman .Blanco was president of the re
public then. He was an Industrious presi
dent, too; nobody deries that. The only
exception that can be taken to hla method
of work was that Instead of looking after
his country his energies were confined
wholly to getting hold oi large sums of gold
and shipping them out of the country for
his own private use in event of a rainy day.
, Blanoo had a daughter, the very beautiful
than regu-
worth o(
art now Belling at about one-half price
Tailored Skirts
S6.98
r
All the high-class tailored skirts, many
are new coat skirts and other fashion
able favorites, worth (Q AO A ftO
$12.60 to $20, at . . . . )0.f 5'7.U5
Jacket Suits
Women's new silk dresses
and wool suits that have
been selling up to
$15
$17.50,
at
$5
About 1-3 Former Price
I M 00 Wash Duck r nv
coats, at 3L!fO
Women's Sheer and Dainty
Shirt Waists
New lota brought forward
summer white and' colored
" waists that are actually worth
$1.50, are going
at....
69c
Lingerie and tailored shirt
waists, all extreme styles and
worth as high as $4, n
are going at
All oar most lraot high frada
Waists of silk, laoa, nats, shaar
llnsns, rto, ara golag at H 'rloa.
woman who Is now the Duchess de Morny
In Paris. He had also a niece, equally
lovely. Both these young women were fa
miliar with the French capital, both had
received attention from the Duke de Morny,
and both regarded with a not unfavorable
eye the prospect of queening it In Parisian
society.
Enter Hamilton on the scene. In the
Intervals of selling biscuits he mode the
acquaintance of Blanco's niece and de
voted himself to her. Next he had the
happy Idea of exploiting the natural
wealth of Venesuela, marrying the young
lady, and playing a great part in douth
America for the rest of his natural life.
And he seemed truly in a fair way to
fulfill his ambition. He petitioned lor a
concession of the rt'ghta of all the natural
products of the stats of Bermudes, and
volunteered to find capital to exploit hi
grant, allowing a liberal percentage of
the profits to drift into the pocket of
President Blanco. Blanco was not ill dis
posed to this Idea, but he hesitated. Ham
ilton had not much ready cosh at his dis
posal, and Blanco did not have the high
est opinion of his ability to procure it.
This is where the woman first appears
In the play. Senorita Blanco possessed
much of her father's executive ability
and she did not propose to have any wo
man come between her and the duke of
her choice. She conceived the Idea of
marraylng her cousin and Hamilton, first
making Hamilton rich and eligible. Now
Blanco's one weakness was his daugnter.
She could persuade him to do anything;
and she persuaded htm to give Hamilton
the concession. Everything went through
as planned. Very shortly Hamilton mar
ried the niece and received from the uncle
as a wedding gift the desired grant.
From that moment the United States
was Interested in the Bermudes asphalt
lake and troubles begun.
The American Financier.
After the wedding It wss "up to " Ham
ilton to produce the American financier
who was to develop the country. Coming
up to New York, he interested several
people, notably W. H. Thomas, and the
New York A Bermudes Company was
formed. Many years later, after passing
through vsrious changes, the New York
& Bermudes company Into the hands
of the General Asphalt company, the great
concern which claims so serious a griev
ance against Csstro today.,
Alas, poor Hamilton! One little para
graph will dispose of him and his connec
tion with the romance. The New York &
Bermudes company sent him back to Vene
suela to represent them there. Hamilton
had money and if ha did not know much
about asphalt he knew a great deal about
how to get rid of ready cash In a short
time. What with the yachts snd entertain
ments and riotous living of one kind and
another, Hamilton did not last long. He
spent his money, he lost his job, and hs
wss reduced to penury. He wandered over
the tropics borrowing such small sums
ss he could and his wife came to New
York and opened a boarding house.
Bo muih ftr tie romance of Hamilton and
the niece. The daughter had so such ssd
fate awaiting her. Blanco's rainy day, so
long anticipated, cams one morning In the
shape of a bomb. True, the bomb was
badly made and did not explode, but It con
veyed a hint to Blanco, and that night hs
and his daughter left the country. Their
leavetaklng ,was brief and not very sad.
The tale (perhaps little exaggerated) runs
that some 130,000,000 In gold had preceded
them. Back In Caracas there srs riots
and Blanco's statue Is pulled down and It
1s well that he Is not there, or It would go
hard with him. In New York, when the
family land content and smiling from their
steamer, De Morny meets them, the ac
cepted lover of the beautiful Miss Blanoo.
Then there is a fashionable wedding In
porta and a dowry of K 000. 000 of asphalt
money paid over to the duke. Incidentally,
and just to show bow trouble pursued the
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A FINAL CLEARING SALE OF OUR
Newest Plain and Fancy Silks
Worth $1.00 and $1.25, at Yard 59c
Thousands of yards of the best plain nnd fancy rough
weave silks. This season's most charming dress silks,
newest browns, Copenhagen, Cham- u ffL
pagne, leather shades and all J'1 u IO
the newest patterns, at yard , ;
BLACK SILKS
Lyons dy black per up I ra
tion and waterproof dress
lib .- . m t a
49c
una, w vi in ef i, ax l aiUi e a
Otl boiled black taffeta,
17 Inches wide, worth
$1.16. at, yard
It-Inch black dress taf
feta. "Brandels Special'
always $1.76, at yard.'.
Black Crepe de Chene.
heavy lustre, worth
59c
98c
59c
i.JB. at yard
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TRUNKS AND SUIT CASES
fop Your Summer Vacation
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A great and complete stock in our Suit Case and Trunk depart
ment; in basement, new store.
TBtTWM Well made trunks; a larae
variety and all sties to select from;
very special prices (luring
August; 945.00 down to...
.$4.M
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aSLm $2.50 Dress Goods 89c
Imported medium weight dress goods, including many
exclusive patterns, 42 to 54 inches wide, shadow stripes
in the stunning greys, tans, etc., finest im- fftk
ported French Voiles, etc,
worth $2.50, your choice
$1 Dress Goods at 39c
All wool dress goods In medium
weight. Including 5 4 -inch fancy
suitings, etc, bar- fT
gain square, JlFd
yard ....
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ox
Monday
25c
Hydrogen Peroxide
8c
ISO Colgate's Tooth Powder, for lBo
J6c Colgate's Talcum Powder ...lBo
11.50 Oriental Cream for tl.OS
5o Consuelo Cream for ,.I7o
ISastman's Bensoln and Almond Lo
tion, for o
S6e Satlnett Rie Powder, for,.14
BOVT MZ8B NObDATI BAB-
OAJirsi
10c Soaps go, S cakes In a box at 13o
15o Snaps, special So
lte Chamois for to
16c Tooth Brush, for 8o
lonononond
BRANDEIS
asphalt, on the day of the marriage the
duke de Morny's mistress killed herself.
But now we come to another romantic
personality, Ambrose Carner. When Ham
ilton showed that he was better fitted for
amusing himself in Caracas than for de
veloping the asphalt region of Bermudes,
the company sent Ambrose Carner to take
his place. A very able man, this newcomer
In the asphalt melodrama. The rights of
his case are tangled up, too, but his carter
Is well known and interesting. Carnor
was a good business man and the com
pany appreciated1 the way he went to wojk
and dug asphalt out-of that queer lake in
Bermudes. He was Interested In his job
as no one ever accused Hamilton of being.
In fact, he Is secured of being so much
Interested that he Is willing to do anything
to keep It.
Castro Versas the Company.
There has been a tremendous fight be
tween the General Asphalt company and
Castro, a fight big enough to bring this na
tion to the verge of war. Carner worked
first In the Interest of the company that had
sent him to Venezuela, and now the com
pany's rights have been concelled by Cas
tro, but Carner Is still digging asphalt. Only
he Is working for the other man. Carner,
the General Asphalt company's representa
tive in Venesuela, was named by Castro as
receiver for the company when. Its conces
sions were annulled. Other men connected
with the melodrama are found, prosperous
or penniless, all over the globe, but the
only one who has never stirred from ene
suela, who has managed always to be dig
ging asphalt at a profit, Is Mr. Carner.
His example waa followed to a certain
extent by A. I. Barber, who was chair
man of the board of directors of the
Asphalt Company of America and the
National Asphalt company when they failed
In 1901. There was a capital of $58.000,OuO
Involved, and the companies paid 10 per
cent. Again did ruin and desolation fol
low the asphalt. Fortunes were lost, fam
ilies used to luxury were brought to want.
That strange lake had again sent out
Its miasma of wretchedness and despair.
It may be Interesting to note that the
first report of Carner, the receiver of his
former company, sets forth that 102,000
tons of asphalt had been sold for (43,000,
"but only $8,000 wss turned In to the Vene
suela treasury. The remaining 6485,000 Is
charged to "expenses and Improvements."
In this last phase of the asphalt romance
Castro plays the leading part. Some people
say that Castro is an accident. If he Is,
he is a pretty serious one. Nobody paid
much attention to him at the beginning.
Then he started a revolution nine years
sgo and made himself president. And If
the asphalt workers had troubles before,
they faded into Insignificance when Castro
look hold.
Castro's slogan Is "South America for tho
South Americans." He never looked with
a favorable eye upon the stranger within
his gates. He was pretty hard on the
asphalters, snd when Matos, Blanco's
brother-in-law, started a revolution, there
were a good many people who thought he
would be preferable to Castro as president.
Castro says that this appreciation of Matos
took a very practical financial form, and
he said that the Americans Interested In
Che asphalt trust (barring Barber and Car
ner) were filibusters. He said so to the
ststs department, and Senator Cullom said
he should be "spanked. But he hasn't
been spanked yet.
He has cancelled the concessions made
for asphalt digging on the ground that
the Bermudes company had failed to carry
out the terms of the concession. The
"revolutionary suit" was an after-thought,
but an embarrassingly clever one. The
asphalt people say that they gave money
to Matoa because at the time of his revo
lution be absolutely controlled the Province
of Bermudas, and Castro could not protect
them and their property. They do not
deny the episode of the money.
The upshot of It Is that Castro is In
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WHITE SILKS ftlAJWcc
Yard wide white taffetaa, worth
$1.50. at. 7C
yard I DC
27-Inch heary white Jap Silk,
a
worth $1.00, at 49c
si
Imported white Mescaline, 2
inches wide, worth Q
$1.35, at, yard OJC
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oaonoaonononononononoaoaond
onononoDoaoaoaoaoi
ono
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I MVTT CASKS Mad of leather
STJTT
and
CASKS Marin of
Kerotal reinforced
I
I
a lilg; variety at
915.00 down to
$1.25
n
onoaoQOQoaonooono
oaonoaononoainonQ
D
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etc., positively f& Ej
Monday, at yard. ...
Black Dress Goods at 69e
46-lnch black chiffon weight
Panamas for a cool traveling
suit or separate skirt
just about half price,
at, yard
69c
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oaa
lonoaoaoDOi
a
Drud Salo
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35c
Bath Caps, Mon
19c
day for
Bnbbsr Goods and Soadrisa
One of our large stock rooms
must be vacated at once. As a re
sult some extraordinary bargains
will be found In our drug depart
ment. $1.60 Flannel covered Water Bottle,
for 69o
86c Hot Water Bottle, for 8o
86c Fountain Syringe, for 49o
$1 00 Rubber Oloven, for o
Alt 26o Hntr Brushes, for 9o
All 50c Bath Brushes, for 10
onoi
ononono
possession of all their plant, working IU
na selling the product cneaper man tne 'i
asphalt can be sold by companies which
have to consider Interest on the money
invested in their plant, their railroad, etc : I
All these things were ready made for the j
new company, and the asphalt Is still today '
a gold mine for all but the former Amor- ;
lean owners. - ( i
Chstrares Against Castro. t
President Castro Is a most remarkable
man or he never could stave off trouble I
as he does. He has profited by all the
faults and follies of the many who hava
been concerned In the asphalt melodrama.
He Is Immensely shrewd, and he wants to
keep the exploitation of the natural
wealth of his conutry In the hands of na
tives. His methods may suggest ooca
slonally tho ancient days of the Spanish
Main, but that only serves to make him .
the more picturesque in this humdrum I
age.
The worst charge brought against him
Is that of the United States and Venes
uela company, who have the Crltohfleld
plant. When Judge Calhoun was sent
down to Investigate the tangle he' gave
them a very clean bill of health, and
went so far as to speak highly of tho
manner In which they had fulfilled th
terms of their agreement with the gov.
ernment, but Castro, contrsry to ths
terms of the concession, imposed a duty
on their asphalt as soon as he went lnti
the business of that unhappy Lake oi
Bermudes. The Crltchfleld claim Is con
sidered one of the strongest of the flv
pending against Venezuela.
But Castro Is not exciting himself. IJt
is having his own way so far, and tit
has lots of people who think him a sec
ond Bolivar. He sits In his palace drink '
Ing Incredible quantities of brandy and
paying no attention whatever to what
Americans think about him.
Meanwhile, with little capital and a
small population, the great resources In
Venesuela remain undeveloped. "Closed
by order of President Castro" is the sigu
that appears on the headquarters of
many a foreign enterprise In Venezuela.
And closed by order of Uncle Sam t sthe
United Ststes legstlon at Caracas. These
two signs will stay there until the whole
question has been gone Into and straight
ened out by some genius. Meanwhlln,
Castro and his friends are making money
and the American claimants In this coun
try are wondering what is going to tap
pen next.
Street car aavertlslng,
Omaha Hotelr Hnnnlv (Vi
moved from ill Bo. 13th to rooms St U SI
U. S. National bank building.
Oer Una Minstrels.
Bones Mlstah Walkah. kin vo' tell m A
airr unce iwwn a tiann ball wot a hit to
one o' de Cube' outfleidahs an' a runaway
couple loplni' on a Kansas rivah steam-
boat r
interlocutor Wo. William: that la ton i
hard for me. What Is the difference be- J
tween a baae bull that's hit to one of the i
Cubs' outfielders and a runaway couple
eloping on a Kansas river steamboat?
Honrs 1 one am caught on do fly an' I
de uddnh am a flight on de Kaw.
lnleiiiicutor Ladies and gentlemen, the
Eiftt-d tenor, Hig. I. Monna Toote. will nw i
sing that moat touching of sentimental haW f
lad. 'Ulve i p l'oker, My Darling; 1 Cal "
Support the Kamlly with Bridge Whist!' "- t'
Chicago jTioune. i
Disgraceful Condact !
of liver and bowels, In refusing to act,
qulkly remedli-d with Dr. King's New Life
Pills. 25c. Biaton Drug Co. (
.Net iieliid.
"You ought to try to take live more phll-
oaophtrally," said I lie man who means well
"1 haven't the raw materials for pluloso- i
phy, ' answered Farmer Cornloaael. I
"Yep. Mot of the philosophy I X
sn needed a foundation of fried eh'aV-iu
and trimmings, and an easy chair Lj. a
box of cigars, snd a number of other J7Ps
1 don t happen to have handy." Waahin
ton Star.
Dr. Rosa, Dentist, 41 Barker Block.
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