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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 09, 1909, GOLDEN SPIKE, Image 37

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TI1E OMAHA SUNDAY BEE: MAY 9, 1009.
The Union Pacific of Today Forty Years After the Golden Spike
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BRIDGE ACROSS THE MISSOURI AT OMAHA.
BY GENERALLY accepted concensus of opinion, the publlo
demand of speed, safety and service seem to be the three
pre-eminent requisites demanded of a first-class railroad to
day. And In meeting these requirements the Union Pacific
easily challenges comparisons. Speed on the Union Pacific
Is already widely known and needs no mention. Among the latest
safety devices Installed is the automatic block signal system, which
is generally conceded to be the most effective means of preventing
railroad collisions, and of avoiding derailments In cose of open
switches or broken rails, that haB so far been devised, and the
Union Pacific railroad furnishes to its patrons, absolutely free of
charge, the protection afforded by this system.
The Block Signal System
The principle of the system Is simple. The track Is divided Into
sections, or "blocks," a mile or so In length, and at each end of
every block a signal Is erected. The most approved form of signal
is that known as the "Semaphore," and this Is the type of signal
used on the Union Pacific. It consists of a post about twenty-five
feet in height, with an arm or blade near the top, the position of this
arm Indicating to engineers of approaching trains whether or not
It is safe to proceed through the block.
If there is a train, an open switch or a broken rail In the block
the arm stands straight out from the post horizontally. When the
block Is clear, and It is safe for trains to proceed through it, the
arm is pulled downward until It stands at an angle of about 30
degrees from the post. At night a red light Is displayed at the top
of the post when the arm is In the horizontal or "danger" position,
and a green light Is displayed when the arm la in the inclined or
"clear" position.
The operation of the signals used on the Union Pacific Is entirely
automatic. An electric current flowing through the rails of the track
holds the signal In the clear position as long as the block Is clear.
A train, open switch or a broken rail interrupts this current, thereby
releasing the electric clutch which Is holding the signal clear, and
the arm Immediately flies to the danger position. When the block
is again clear the signal is restored to the clear position by a small
electric motor.
Railroad mileage in the United States has reached the grand .
total of 227,000 miles, on which there are now installed 11,932 miles
of automatic electric block signals. Of this amount the Harrlman
lines have to their credit 4,832 miles, or one-third or the total, and
practically all of this system of protection west of the Mississippi
river.
The cost of Installing is approximately $1,600 per mile, with
the maintenance cost about $160 a mile annually. The expense
formerly incurred by accidenta, which are in this way prevented, by
no means compensated for the cost and operation of such signals. It
is In the safeguarding of the traveling public and employes, however,
that the railroads find sufficient inducement, and also in the In
creased volume of business by reason of the feeling of security,
which makes more people travel. In the last ten years over $12,
000,000 have been expended upon safety appliances on the Harrlman
lines.
UNION PACIFIC tCAR SHOPS
costing $260,000 down to a couple ol passenger coaches switched
off on a siding. Generally, however, these associations are housed In
substantial and handsome structures costing from $6,000 to $60,000.
There are hot and cold water baths, restaurant attachment, dormi
tories, well equipped gymnasium, library and reading room, billiard
room, riding (writing) room, etc.
Mr. Harrlman has been a good genius, who has aided munifi
cently in help of the Southern Pacific railway clubs, and the Union
Pacific and Its allied lines enjoy the same facilities, some of the club
houses costing as high as $16,00.
Pensions
The earliest plan of pensioning employes on an American rail
road was put In operation by the Baltimore & Ohio in 1884. The
Pennsylvania's plan, adopted in 1900, has been the recognized model
on nearly every rallroifQ In the country In the matter of pension
system. Under this plan the employe's retirement Is compulsory at
70 years of age, or may be voluntary for Incapacitation between the
ages of 66 and 69, after thirty years of service. Allowance of 1
per cent of the monthly pay, multiplied by the number of years of
service. An employe who has worked for the company for thirty
AT OMAHA.
years and whose monthly pay during the last ten years of this service
averaged, $100 would receive a pension of $30 a month. This plan
of pensioning is effective on the Harrlman lines.
Hospital and Medical Service
The Southern Pacific, in addition to usually arranged hospital
service, makes use of a car in Its medical work, which is not only
a vehicle of transportation, but a complete hospital on wheels. The
equipment of the car Is such that the most delicate operation can be
performed in it at the very scene of an accident with as much care
as at a regularly equipped hospital. The Union Pacific and all lines
grouped under the general title of the Harrlman lines, are equipped
with adequate hospitals and hospital arrangements.
Willing to Spend Money
The money spent on the Harrlman properties, some of it from
capital interested and Borne from earnings, which haB been used to
promote the material development of the states and communities
traversed by those lines, amounts to the enormous Bum of nearly
$260,000,000. Roads like the Southern Pacific, the Oregon Short
Line, the Oregon Railroad and Navigation company, the Pacific Mall
PASSENOERI STATION AT OMAHA.
Steamship company and various other railways of lesser importance,
have been practically recreated and a vast area of valuable contribut
ing territory been opened up by building nearly 2,000 miles of new
road.
Land Sales
Of the lands granted to the Union Pacific Railroad company
and the Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph company, situated la
Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Utah, there have been sold
11,113,964.49 acres, representing 17,366 sections.
Of the lands granted to the Kansas Pacific Railway company In
Kansas and Colorado, east of Denver, there have been sold 6, 263,
267.90 acres, representing 9,786 sections.
Finances
The balance sheet of the Union Pacific and Southern Pacific for
the year ending June 30, 1908, is as follows:
U. P. System
Passenger revenue $
Revenue passengers carried
Revenue passengers carried one
mile
Freight revenue $
Tons of revenue freight carried. . . .
Tons of revenue freight carried one
mile
16,641,467
6,460,286
760,632,906
' 62,899,157
13,089,163
5,271,939,813
, 76,039,224
So. Pacific Co.
$ 35,800,692
19,080,205
1,452,147.456
$ 71,073,667
22,840,404
6,486,220.688
$ 123,276,920
Rewards of Merit
la
The 1908 inspection on the Union Pacific was completed
November of that year and was done In the following manner:
The railroad is divided into five superintendent's districts, each
of whom has under him a corps of assistants, among them is the
assistant division engineer, a man who Is selected for the position
owing to a particular fitness for the work in his charge mainten
ence of track. He is a man of many years' practical experience with
the pick, signal department, buildings coal houses, depot buildings,
shop buildings, etc., are inspected. The markings of the inspectors
are averaged and the prizes awarded as follows:
Gold medal given roadmaBter having best district on the railroad.
Gold medal given section foreman having best section on the
railroad.
Gold medal given agents having perfect stations.
Sliver medal given pumpers halving perfect pump houses.
Silver medal given section foreman having best sectioa on dis
trict. The Wyoming division has the distinction of being In the highest
physical condition this year. The roadmaster on the district between
Cheyenne and Laramie, Wyo., winning the gold medal for the best
district on the railroad, and the foreman on the section located In
the vicinity of Kearney, Neb., won the gold medal for the best
section on the entire road. '
The medals are so arranged that if the prize Is secured more
than once by the same man a bar with the year Imprinted thereon
is added to the same.
Welfare of the Men
. It is generally understood that all things in connection with a
great railway system haB for its final goal only one object, "the
good of the service," which means, of course, the comfort and safety
of the traveling public, dividends for the stockholders, and more
business for the road. In the case of the Union Pacific it is only
just to say that the welfare of tie employes Is no unimportant factor
and is magnificently taken care of by the company. Summed up, It
is an effort on the part of the company, over and above the payment
of wages, toward the betterment of those conditions under which
the employe lives and works. The railroad Young Men's Christian
association shows on a railroad map of this country fully 80 per cent
of the mileage, and these receive the commendation and liberal sup
port of nearly all the great railway companies of the country. As a
rule, the railway e recta the building or furnishes the major portion
of the construction funds and contributes liberally to the operating
cost, say 40 per cent, nearly 60 per cent being paid by the members.
These Institutions range in size from a splendid building In St. Louis
1869
Union Pacific Railroad Company.
1909
PRESENT OFFICIAL STAFF.
DIRECTORS;
OLIVER AMES Boston, Mass.
A. J. EARLING Chicago, 111.
HENRY C. FR1CK .Pittsburg, Pa.
ROBERT W. GOELET. .New York. N. Y.
EDWARD H. HARRIMAN. New York, N. Y.
MARVIN HUOHITT Chicago, 111.
ROBERT S. LOVETT. . .New York, N. Y.
WILLIAM MAHL .New York, N. Y.
CHARLES A. PEABODY New York, N. Y.
WILLIAM G. ROCKEFELLER New York, N. Y.
HENRY H. ROGERS New York, N. Y.
JOSEPH F. SMITH Salt Lake City, Utah.
P. A. VALENTINE .Chicago, 111.
FRANK A. VANDERLIP New York, N. Y.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
EDWARD H. HARRIMAN, Chairman. MARVIN HUGHITT.
HENRY C. FRICK. ROBERT S. LOVETT.
FRANK A. VANDERLIP.
Gross revenue. . . .
Number of employes and salaries-
Employes June 30, 1908.... 25,296
Salaries Entire year... $ 24,831,549
Amount paid for pensions $ 27,143 $
Expenditures hospital fund $ 187,476
Average miles operated rail lines. 6,781
'This information cannot be given at this time.
The Union Pacific syBtem comprises the Union Pacific railroad,
the Oregon Short Line railroad and the Oregon Railroad and Naviga
tion company.
The mileage of the Union Pacific by divisions la as follows:
130,315
9,505
Main Line.
Nebraska division 308.79
Wyoming division 898.93
Utah division 310.36
Kansas division 802.58
Colorado division 645.96
Branch Line.
490.75
70.38
40.67
639.49
160.35
Total.
799.54
469
850
936
753
31
93
45
62
Total mileage operated... .1,913.83 1,395.92 3,309.75
Equipment
Number of passenger cars. . , 418
Number of freight cars 15,212
""Number of company service cars.., 2,445
GENERAL OFFICERS.
exxctutxyii bepabthxitt.
EDWARD H. HARRIMAN President Now York, N.
ROBERT S. LOVETT Vice President . New York, N.
J. KRUTTSCHNITT Director of Maintenance and Operation. Chicago, 111.
W. B. SCOTT Assistant Director of Maintenance and Operation Chicago, 111.
W. A. WORTHINGTON ..Assistant to Director of Maintenance and Operation Chicago, 111.
W. V. 8. THORNE Director of Purchases New York, N.
ALEXANDER MILLAR Secretary , New York, N.
JOSEPH HELLEN Assistant Secretary Now York, N.
WILLIAM MAHL Comptroller New York, N.
HERBERT S. BRADT Assistant Comptroller New York, N.
UW DEPABTMEJTT.
ROBERT S. LOVETT Counsel New York, N.
MAXWELL EVARTS Attorney New York, N.
N. H. LOOMIS General Solicitor .Omaha, Neb.
TBAPPIO DEPABTMEST
J. C. STUBBS Traffic Director - Chicago, 111.
E. O. McCORMICK Assistant Traffic Director Chicago, 111.
P. C. 8TOHR Assistant Traffic Director Chicago, 111.
JOHN A. MUNROE Freight Traffic Manager Omaha, Neb.
EDWARD L. LOMAX General Passenger and Ticket Agent Omaha, Neb.
Y.
Y.
Y.
Y.
Y.
Y.
Y.
Y.
Y.
FREDERIC V. S. CROSBY.
FRANK D.
TSE1BOBT StPlXTMin.
Treasurer New York, N.
Neb.
BROWN Local Treasurer Omaha,
ACCOTOTiira depabthest.
ERASTUS YOUNG General Auditor Omaha,
H. J. STIRLING Auditor Omaha,
OPEBATXBO BEPABTMEHT.
A. L. MOHLER Vice President and General Manager .' Omaha,
R. L. HUNTLEY Chief Engineer Omaha,
JOHN D.
JOHN W
Neb.
Neb.
Neb.
Neb.
ISAACS Consulting Engineer .Chicago, 111.
GRIFFITH Purchasing Agent Omaha, Neb.
NEW YORK OFFICES. 120 Broadway.
OMAHA OFFICES, Ninth and Farnam Streets.
Total . , 18,075
Number of servlcable engines, freight and passenger 660
The main line of the old Overland road stretches from Council
Bluffs to Ogden, a distance of 1,003 miles, and 351 miles of this
distance has been double-tracked. The Union Pacific enjoys the dis
tinction of being the only double-track railroad of any length west
of the Missouri river.
High Standard of Maintenance
There is no question that the railroad and right-of-way of the
whole line is maintained in superb condition. The total absence
of dust Is constantly noted by the traveler over this line. This is
accounted for by the use of a fine disintegrated granite gravel, taken
from the company's beds at Sherman Hill, Just west of Cheyenne,
which is used for ballast, making an exceptionally solid roadbed,
with a resultant of scarcely any dust. The company's stations all
present an attractive appearance, having all been recently repainted,
and the grounds surrounding them maintained as well as those
of the beat eastern railroads. The rlght'Oi-way for 100 feet on each
Bide of the track is fenced In over the entire line, as protection to,
and damage from, stray cattle, etc. All ties are constantly renewed
and a record Is kept In Omaha of every tie Installed and the length
of time it lasts. The steady adherance to high standards Is shown
also In the replacing of all lighter structures with steel bridging.
Nearly 11,000 feet of steel bridging has been built to replace wooden
bridges. In one year this Item of expense cost $2,000,000. Ninety
pound rails are supplanting eighty-pound rails as fast as they can
be laid.
Essential Soundness
The future of the Union Pacific is secure, for four very sub
stantial reasons:
1. The superior physical condition of the property.
2. The proved ability of the management to operate the rail
road economically.
3. The promise of the country wnlch the line penetrates and
the boundless opportunity for the further development of the railroad.
4. The valuable equities owned by the Union Pacific in other
railroad, securities.
Still Improving
The restless energy of Mr. Harnman never haltB. His mental
processes are very rapid and even unusual-. His mind leaps over
Intermediate difficulties, and he goes on a direct way to strong
endeavor, because he has no time to waste on argument pr explana
tion. He has been among the first tc declare that our present track
guage of four feet eight and one-half Inches Is Inadequate to present
railway needs and that we must come soon to a six-foot guage. He
was one of the very first to see the use of a railway gasoline motor
passenger car to take the place of the locomotive and two heavy
and nearly empty passenger cars of a train, with their expensive
crews. These cars are now used on the Union Pacific, Southern
Pacific and other railways. Someone has said that he would have
made a great general at the head of an army. In these days of piping
peace he is at the head of a great Industrial army of 114,000 all
moving with certain, sure, swift energy and Industry.

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