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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, September 04, 1910, SPORTING, Image 25

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SPORTING
saoei (i to rout.
VOL. XL NO. i:
OMAHA, SUNDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 4, 1910.
SINGLE COPY FIVE CENTS.
Jobbers and Drummers Winners; Pirates Nose Out; King" Cole Has Chance to Make .Good
Fhe Omaha
SPORTS
HEARNE WINS
LONG AUTO RACE
Drives Benz Car t) Victory in Oae
Hundred-Mile Free-for-All at
Indianapolis.
MAKES ONLY ONE STOP FOR OIL
BsssasBSSBSSSBS)
Victor Takes the Lead from Start and
Hold It.
WELL KNOWN DRIVERS ENTERED
Contest is Feature of First Day's
Meet at Indianapolis.
IS WORTH THOUSAND DOLLARS
Knight, la a Westcott Machine, U
. Second, with Livingstone and .
Hearne Taklna- Remaining
Places in Order.
INDIANAPOLIS, Sept. S.Eddie Hearne
piloted hla big Bens car to victory in the
100-mile free-for-all and the ten-mile open
event for the speedway helinot and so car
ried off the majority of the laurels In the
first day of the final race meeting on the
Indianapolis speedway here today. Hearne's
victory in the 100-mile battle netted him
81,000 In cosh and by winning the short
free-for-all he retained possession of the
speedway helmet which he had captured at
the July meeting with the same machine
and which bears with It a salary of 850 per
, war k.
The second 100-mlle struggle of the pro
gram was open to stock chassis cars under
450 cubic Inches piston displacement and the
Blue National, driven by Howard Wilcox,
won without a atop In the fast time of
83' minutes 8 seconds, with Charley Merz,
in the other National entrant, a good seo-
ond. The Speedwell, driven -by "Jap"
Clemens, was the third In the long race
to receive the checkered flag.
Wilcox Is a new star in the firmament
of racing stars and by his remarkable non
stop success In the long stock chassis race
gains possession of the sliver brassard,
which carries a salary of $75 per week until
the end of the speedway contest season
and also takes Into the National camp a
trophy cup, both of which were offered for
tha 100-mile brassard classic.
tack far Race Well Contested.
The stock car race was more closely con
tested than the free-for-all. The two Na
tionals and Joe Dawson, In a Marmon,
battled around the two and one-half-mile
circuit until the Marmon Incurred motor
trouble as It was coming Into the stretch
at high apeed and so was forced to retire
in the sljcty-seventh mile.'
The Weacott car, driven by Knight, took
second money In the long distance free-for-all
competition and Livingstone hurled a
lock National across the wire for third
honors. Hearne's Ben was not crowded at
any time. He did not experience any tire
trouble and stopped only once for oil.
The Chicago youngster and his foreign
car averaged seventy-five miles an . hour
for the entire 100 miles, but his time of
79 minutes and (3.1 seconds does not lower
any records. j-
The entire program of ten events today
failed to produce a new mark.
In the time trials, the Flat, driven by
De Pa I ma, covered the mile spring In 38:64
seconds, but this time is two seconds
slower than the present records.
No accidents marred the races.
Dudie Archdale
Eqi
uals Record
at Read vil le
Eailworthy Wins Massachusetts Stake
from Nebraska Mare The Har
i Tester Goes for Record.
READVILLE, Mass., Sept. 8-Hallworthy
won the fifteenth renewal of the classic
Massachusetts I10.CO0 trotting stake here
today, but his victory was shared by the
trim little mare, Dudle Archdale, as in the
opening heat of the race she won in 2:0b,,
which equalled the record of the stake made
by Sadie Mac in 1905. The Harvester, cham
pion trotting stallion of the world, with
record of 2:01, wa sstarted to lower tho
mark, but when the time came for the atVJ
tempt It was raining hard, and he did re
markably well in turning the course in
8:034.
The Bunker Hill and Norfolk stakes were
two remaining features of the day's card.
For the former Koss K. was best liked by
the talent, but Ens 11. Kay won easily.
"Pop" Gears, behind The Abbe, had his
hands full in defeating Evelyn W in both
of tha heats required in deciding the stake.
The 1:16 trot brought out the largest field
In the meeting. C. W. Lasell, the wealthy
owner and driver from W'.Utliiavllle, Mass.,
won easily with Creighton.
Long Flight by
French Aviator
M. Bielouvucci Makes Trip from Paris
to Bordeaux in Less Than
Eight Hours.
BORDEAUX. Sept. 8. M Bielouvucci
ain'"u mi noun irom Angouieme, com
pleting the final stage of his biplane
(light from Paris to Bordeaux. He made
the trip with four stops. Blelouvucci'a
time from Paris to Bordeaux waa
I:sT:S4 of actual flying and 'the
hourly apeed average of (4 ' mllea.
The aviator encountered strong and
baffling head winds In the Dordogne val
ley. Three times he waa beaten back
and he was forceu to rise to. an altitude
of S.000 feet before he could cross the
Dordogne river.
The pleasant purgative effect experienced
by all who use Chamberlain' Stomach and
XJver Tablets, and the healthy condition
of the body and mind which they create,
snake cn feel joyful. Sold by all dealers.
BLUES WIN PITCHERS' DUEL
Brewers Lose in Eleventh Inning
After Fast Contest.
BOTH DRAW STRING OF BLANKS
Kansas City Ilreaks Nothing to
Nothing Tie Pitchers Dougherty
and Powell Occupy Center
of Stage.
MILWAUKEKE. Sept. 3.-Dougherty and
Powell engaged in a pitching duel here this
afternoon, the visitors winning In the elev
enth. 1 to . Score:
KANSAS CITY. MILWAUKEE.
AB.H.O.A.B. AB.H.O.A.B,
Rxrbxau. lb.. 4 lit 0 Randall, rt...4 000
Shannon, If.. 4 14 4 OCIiarle. ' 2b.. 1 1 1 V
Bmool rf.... 111 OMcaOnn. lb. 4 0 14 0 S
Hunter, lb... 0 0 IMarott, It... I 1 4 0
lxa, 2b 4 0 7 1 0 Lew la, aa i 1 1 I 1
Jamra, e 4 11 0 Clark, Sb I 0 110
Rattrrr. cf... 4 0 0 0Sncr, ct... 4 0 i 0
U.wnla, aa... 4 0 5 4 IBrarn, e I 0 0
Powall, p.... 4 0 11 CUouihartr. p. J 1 0 0 0
Totals M I SI IS 1 Totala S U 11 1
Milwaukee 0 000000000 0-0
Kansas City ....0 000000000 11
Two-base hit: James. Bases on ball
Off Powell, 5; off Dougherty, 1. Struck out:
By Poweil. 8; by Dougherty, 7. Time: 8:15.
Umpire: Chill.
INDIANAPOLIS , SPLITS EVEN
Colunibns Secures First Game
of
Double-Header with Ease.
INDIANAPOLIS, Sept. 8. Columbus and
Indianapolis split even today in a double
header. The second game was called at
the end of the sixth inning on account of
darkness. Score, first game:
COLUMBUS. INDIANAPOLIS.
AB.H.O.A.B. AB.H.O.A.B,
Parr ins, lb .l 4 14 0 0 O'Day, ct t 1 1
Hlncbman, If 1 1 1 1 ownliama. lb. I 0 1 I 1
tonsaltun, rtl 0 1 0 OHayden, rt...4 1 1.1
lx.wns, 2b.... 4 1 Offerr, lb 1 1 11 0 0
Mahllns. aa.. 6 1 1 i OMIIIIiran, It.. I 110 1
ixiosll. ct.... 110 OHual,;, c... 4 100
Written, lb.. 111 OCottey, aa.... 4 1140
Curlach, C....I 1 I 0. OKelna, lb.... I 1 i 1 0
Packard, p... 1 0 1 OHardgroTa. pO 0 0 10
Morti, p 1 0 0 1 o
Totala .'1110(7 15 OH Hon, p 1 0 0 0 0
Kerna 1 0 0 0
Bowerman ..1100
Totala ii 17 11 S
Batted forMert In sevenl'h.
Batted for Dixon in ninth.
Columbus 1 1 1 1 0 8 2 1 0-13
Indianapolis 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 18
Two-baso hits: O'Day, Downs (2). Struck
out: By Hardgrove, 1; by Merts, 2; by
Packard, 1. Double plays: Hlnchman to
Mahling to Wratten, Coffey to Williams to
Carr. Stolen 'base: Perrlng. Basses on
balls: Off Packard, 3; off Hardgrove, 2:
off Merts. 3. Hits: Off Hardgrove, 8 In
three innings; off Merts, 12 in six Innings.
Time: 2:10. Umpires: Ferguson and Owens.
Score, second game:
COLUM318. INDIANAPOLIS.
AB.H.O.A.K. AB.H.O.A.K.
Perrlng, lb... 1 17 0 1 O'Day, of.... 1 0 0 0 0
Hlnchman, 1(1 0 1 0 OWtltlama. lb.l
Conaalton,. H 1 0 0 0 Harden, rt...
Dnwna. lb.... 10 11 OCanr, lb 1
Mahllnf, as.. 10 1 OMIIIItan. It.. 1
Odwell, ct.... 10 0 OBrrwerman, el
Wratten, lb.. 10 10 OCottey, aa..,. 1
Arbosaat. s.. 1 1 4 0 OKoena, lb ... 1
Stremmel, p. 1 0 1 1 0 Cheney, p.... 0
. Olass, p 1
i
0 0
0 10
1 1
1 1
11
1 1
0 0
1 0
Touts u anil
Totals...... 11 IS 17 I
Columbus 1 1 0 0 0 02
Indianapolis 0 0 0 0 0 38
Bases on balls: Off Olase, I; off Strem
mel, 3. Struck out: By Stremmel, 8; by
Olase, 2. Hits: Off Olase, three in five
and two-thirds Inning; off Cheney. 1 In one
third Inning. Time: 1:06. Umpires: Fer
guson and Owens.
MILLIES POUND BALL HAUD
Chech Is
Knocked Out of Box in
Seeoad Inning.
ST. PAUL, Sept 3. Minneapolis knocked
Chech out of the box in the second Inning,
making enough runs to win the first game
of the series for St. Paul, 4 to 2. Score:
MINNEAPOLIS. ST. PAUL. ;
AB.H.O.A.K. AB.H.O.A.K.
O'Nell. cf.... 4 ISO ORnueher. lb.. 1 1111
Aimer, aa... x v u o woodruff, if. 4
Cravatb, It.. 4 10 0 OMrC'm'k, aa. 4
Willlama, fb. 4 0 1 1 OJonsa, cf..'... 4
Ruaamsn, lb 4 110 0 Murray, rf...l
Fenia. lb.... 4 111 OStelser, lb... 4
Olll, lb 4 11 1 Raker, lb.... 4
Owena, a 4 14 0 O'Kelly 0
Hughes, p.... 11 1 1 0 Spencer, 0...4
Chech, p 0
Totala U 87 11 1 Laroy, p 0
v Reiser, p.... 1
t Clara 1
Oehrlnf, p.., 0
Ulaa .. 1
0
4 0
1 0
0 1
0 0
1
0. 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
1 0
0
0 0
0
. , Totala 33 27 13 2
Ran for Spencer In the ninth. 7
Hatted for Reiger in the eighth.
Batted lor Gehting in the ninth.
Minneapolis 04000000 0 I
St. Paul 00000002 02
Two-base hits: O'Neill, Olll, Woodruff,
Spencer, Boucher. Three-baee hit: Stelger.
Stolen bases: Boucher. Woodruff. , Double
playn: Jones to Spencer; Rleger, McCor
mlck and Stelger; Altlzer, Williams and
Olll. Hits: Off Chach, 3 in erne and two
thrida Inning; off Lsroy, 0 In one-third
Inning; off Rleger, 4 In six innings: off
Onring, 2 in two innings. Bases on balls:
Off Hlghes. 13; off Reiser. 3; off Gehring,
1. Sacrifice hit: Cravath. Sacrifice fly:
Owns. Left on bases: St. Paul, 7; Min
neapolis, 8. Time: 2:05 Umpires; Bler
halter and Bush.
MUDHTKS WIN BY ONE BUN
Take Close name la Mlnth from
Louisville.
TOLEDO, S-pt. 3 Hlgglnbotham weak
ened In the ninth inning, when three hits,
netting one run, were made off him, Toledo
winning the first game of the series from
Louisville. Score:
TOLEDO. LOUISVILLE.
AB.H.O.A.K. AB.H.O.A.E.
Hallman. rt. 4
110 ORnblneon. aa. S 0 1 4 0
Hl'rhman, !b 1 0 10 0 Meyera, lb... 1 0 14 0 1
y.lnn. rf 4 10 0 OSi.nley. cf... 4 110 0
Hickman, If. 4 1 1 1 0 1 Hole, lb 1 0 0 10
Freeman, lb. 4 0 11 1 I Burke. If 4 0 1 0 0
Pick. tb. 1 lit Orirkarlns. rf. 1 1 100
Brller, aa.... I lit 0 Magaa. 2b.... 1 1460
Green, c 0 I VAIIen, c 1114
Kialrk. p 1 111 tHI'botham. pS 0 0 1 0
Totala 81 7 17 IS 1 Totala 17 42 17 1
Two out when winning run scored.
Toledo 00000800 1 1
Louisville ,.. 00000000
00
Two-base hit: Hallman. Stolen bases:
Butler, Doyle. Sacrifice hits: Magee.
Meyers. First base on halls: Off Ksxlck.
4. Struck out: By Ksslck. 3; by Hlggtn
bntham. 8. Double play: Allen to Meyers.
Time: 1:25. Umpires: Hayes and Cusack.
HUMPHREY SHUTS OUT INDIANS
Fast IMaylag, In Which Locals Have
Best of the Situation.
HUMPHREYS. Neb., Sept. 8.-(Speclal
Telegram.) The Cherokee Indians weoe de
feated by the locals today In one of the
fastest games seen on the home grounds
this season.
"Fat Zavadil waa In good form and hla
teammates gave him 'fin support, allow
ing the Indians five hits and striking out
ten. Score by innings: It H E.
Cherokee Indiana ....0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-0 I 4
Humphrey 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 i t
Two-base hits: Zavadil, Humley. Base on
balls: Off Zavadil, 1. Struck out: By Zava
dil. 10; by Gentry. I; by Porth, 0. Batteries:
Indians, Porth. Gentry and Rumley; Hum
phrey, Zavadil and Tleskotter. Umpire:
Hardin.
Persistent Advertising la the Road to
Big Return
Team
f 1
(i
A
4
a
-:ysi:
Mt
NORTH ST.
HOME RUN WINS IN TENTH
Prambes Lands on a Good One at
Critical Stage.
PITCHERS'' BATTLE ALL THROUGH
St. Joseph Has the Long End of aa
Extra Innlngr Battle with
Denver on the Home
' Grounds. -
DENVER, Sept 5. Frambes' home run.
In the tenth. Inning, won a pitcher's battle
Between St Joseph and ibenver today.
ST. JOSEPH.
A.B. R. H. O. A. E.
Powell, If 4 0 0 S O 0
Fox, 2b... ..4 4 1 1 1 2 1
Jones, lb 3 1 2 14 0 0
McChesney, rf 4 0 0 0 0 0
Riley. 3b 4 0 0 2 7 0
Corhan, ss 3 0 0 2 8 1
Goodrich, cf 4 0 1 0 0 0
Frambes, c 4 -1.1 6 0 1
Kaufman, p 4 0 0 0 0 0
Totala 34 3 6 30 12 3
DENVER.
' A.B. R. H. O. A.j E.
Lloyd. 2b v.. ....... 5 114 6 0
Kelly. If 5 0 1 2 0 0
Beall, cf 3 0 1 4 0 0
Lindsay, lb 4 0 1 14 0 0
Dolan, 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0
Cranston, as 4 0 0 0 , 5.1
Cassldy. rf 4 1 1 o 0 o
Weaver, c. 4 0 1 5 1 0
Bhutan, p 8 0 v0 1 1 0
McMprray 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 2 6 30 14 1
Batted for Ehman In the tenth.
St Joseph 2 00000000 18
Denver :..0 01100000 02
Stolen bass: Cassldy. Three-base hits:
Jones, Weaver. Home runs: Jones, Fram
bes. Struck out: By Kaufman, 6; by
Elunan, 4. Bases on balls: Off Kaufman, 1;
off Ehman, 2. Double plays: Cranston to
Lloyd to Lindsay. Left on bases: Denver,
6; St. Joseph, 4. Time: 1:47. Attendance:
1,000. Umpires: Fiynn and Graves.
t
WICHITA WINS WITH EASE
First Game of the Serlea Is Taken by
lssles.
WICHITA. Kan., Sept S.-Wlchlta out
played Topeka at all stages of the- game
and easily took the first of the series
7 to 1. Score:
WICHITA.
AB. R. II. O. A. E.
II.
1
1
3
0
2
3
1
0 .
2
13
II.
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
O.
2
0
1
2
13
2
1
6
0
27
O.
0
10
3
6
0
1
3
0
2
1
A.
0
0
.2
0
0
4
3
'I
4
14
Middlet'on, cf.
Pettlgrew, rf.
Weaterzil. 3b..
Belden, If
Koe.rner, lb...
Hughes, 2b....
ftt-limld, ss....
Clemmons, c.
Durham, p....
Totals ....
4 0 1 2 0 0
33 7
TOPEKA.
AB. R.
A.
3
0
1
1
0
6
0
3
1
2
Reiliy, as....
Beckley. lb..
Riley, ft
Welch, 2b....
Abbott. If....
StauCfer, 3b..
Barber, cf ...
Maxey, c...
nea, c
3
Totals
..30
0 0
. 0 0
1 3
0 0 1
0 0 0
24
1 4
1 0
la 6
1 -7
0 0-1
Wichita ..
iopuka
1eft on banes: Topeka, 2; Wichita, 6. Sac
rifice hits: Pettlgrew, Hugnes, Schmid, Mld
dleton. Home run: Reilly. Stolen baoea:
Schmid, Hughes (2), Pettlgrew, Westerzll,
Koerner. Double play: Riley to Stauffer to
Welch. Struck out: lly Durham, 0: by ju
gate, 3. Base on balls: Off Fugate, 1. Passed
ball: Shea, tilt by pi toned bail: Welch.
Time: l.5. Umpire: Clark.
Dodare Defeats ltoper.
DODGE, Neb., Sept. 8. Speclal!) Thurs
day Dodge defeated Hooper. This Is
the second defoat Hooper has received at
the hands of the looals this year. The gain
was a clean victory, the Hooper boys never
having a chance to win. Although they
made more hits than the locals they were
srattered. while lxxlge bunched theirs and
hit when hits meaiH runs, bcore:
R.H.E.
Dodge 2 4 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 7 1
Hooper 10000006 041 8 4
Two-base hit: Hadley. Three-base hit:
Srb. Struck out: By Young, 13; by Miller,
4. Time: 1:26.
Do you know that WAVES LOCK Is the
best preparation ever put In a bottle for
the hair and scalpT Try It. All druggists.
barbers and hairdressers.
of Invaders Looks
, st
. v, K. ii t,4 .
1
88??
PAUL SEMI-PROS NOW PLATING IN
Cornhuskers to
Have Hard Foot
Ball Schedule
Manager Eager, Has Arranged Eight
Games, Four of Them Be-
. ing rougo. '
LINCOLN, September 3. (Special.)
Profiting from the experience of the last
three years. Manager Eager has carefully
arranged the foot ball schedule so that it
Is one of the most attractive. In years. The
season will open with Peru normal team.
A week later the university of South
Dakota will come to Lincoln. Last year
the Cornhuskers were given a hard battle
by the "Coyotes." In the. third game of
the season Nebraska meets Minnesota at
Minneapolis. Two lighter contests are
scheduled before "the Cornhuskers Journey
to Lawrence to meet the oldtime rivals.
Whether the Cornhuskers can play two
hard games In succession is the question
bothering the coaches. On the week tol
lowing the Kansas game, Ames will come
to Lincoln. This marks the resumption of
foot ball relations with the agricultural
college.
On the following Saturday the Cornhusk
ers have a rest. In . preparation for the
Thanksgiving day atruggle with "Johnny"
Bender's Haskell Indians. This gives the
Cornhuskers eight games, four of which are
regarded as hard contests. Following Is
the schedule:
October 1 Peru Normal at Llncolnk
October 8 South Dakota at Lincoln.
October lftMinnesota at Minneapolis.
October 23 Denver at Lincoln.
October 2 Doane at Lincoln.
November 6 Kansas at Lawrence. '
November 12 Ames at Llnooln.
November 19 No game to be scheduled.
November 24 Haskell Indians at Lincoln.
Two Games for
Next Two Days
Double-Headers to Be , Played Both
Sunday and Monday Af
ternoons. Omaha and Lincoln ball players will have
a strenuous time during the next two days.
As a result of the postponement of Satur
day's game on account of the rain - and
with the doubleheader already scheduled
tor Monday, four games will have to be
played in two days. The first game
each day will begin at 2 o'clock sharp.
With the Rourkes all In perfect condition,
after a rest of two days, they should be 1
able to take up that streak where they
left off about a week ago. With an even
break at Denver and Wltchita, following
the exhibition made In the last sixteen
games at home, they have more than held
their own.
BASE BALL AT NEBRASKA CITY
Maaagers of Team and Local Faaa Are
Arrauarlngr for Strong; Team.
NEBRASKA CITY, Neb.. Sept. 3 (Spe
cial.) The Mink league team plays Its last
game of ball here for the season, with the
Maryvtlle team. The Nebraska City team
has been unfortunate at the latter end of
the season and at present Captain Waller
and Hk'klln, the crack center fielder, are
laid up with sprained ankles. A move Is
already on foot to form a strong financial
organization to put a stronger and faster
team here next season. The team has. been
well supported and close the season with
out any debts. Next year the salary limit
will be raised and bigger bonus raised so
that the fast players will be kept in the
team. Nebraska City has proved to have
been the best base ball town In the league
and all of the players received a bonus
above their salaries donated by individual.
Often purses have been raised for players
who made freak plays and one player re
ceived better than $100 for one game.
Persistent Advertising la tha Road to
Big Return
Good
..
. -it. .1 V.v t-' , v r
ii
1
NEBRASKA.
PIRATES WIN OYER REDS
4 1
Adams Allows Only Four Hits and
Visitors Get Ten.
FINAL SCORE IS TWO TO NOTHING
Pittsburg; Fata Man Over Home Plate
In Second and Fifth Innings
McLean lacarei . Three
. Base Hit.
CINCINNATI, Sept. 8. Adams allowed
only four hits and Pittsburg won.
PITTBBUKO. CINCINNATI.
AB.H.O.A.B. AB.H.O.A.E.
Byrne, lb.... & 0 1 l.OBearher, If... 4 0 S 0
letch, cf....4 110 UEan, lb 4 0 11
Campbell, if. 1 0 1 0 OHoblltial, lb. 4 0 7 0
Wacnar, aa... 4 114 1 Mitchell, rf.. 4 0 1 0
i. Millar, lb 4 I 1 4 VPaEkert, cf... 4 0 3 1
Flynn, lb.... 4 18 0 0MLen, c... 1 1 11
Wilson, rf.... 4 1 1 0 0 Clarke, e 1 0 1 0
Hlmon. e 441 OLobert. lb.... 1011
Adama, p.... 1 0 0 1 0 McMillan, aa 1 0 1 1
Memke, aa... 0 0 1 0
Totals 34 10 17 11 lBurna, p 1 1 0 1
W Miller.... 0 0 0 0
, ' .'" PUelan 0 0 0 0
Totala II 4 27 II 1
Ran for McLean In the seventh.
'Batted for McMillan in the eighth.
Pittsburg 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0. 0-2
Cti.clnnati. .......0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-0
Three-base hit: McLean. Bases on balls:
Off Adams. 2. Struck out: By Adams. 2;
by Burns, 3. Time: 1:60. Umpires: lUgler
and Emslle,
GIANTS WIN BY F0UB, TO TWO
Phtladelphtn'a Klnth Inning- Rally In
Unavailing.
PHILADELPHIA. Sept 3. New York de
feated Philadelphia today, 4 to 2. A double
header was scheduled, but only one game
could bo played on account of the muddy
condition -of the grounds. Score:
NEW YORK. PHILADBUHIA.
AB.H.O.A.E. . AB.H.O.A.E.
Derore. - If.... 10
0 0 Titus, rf.
1 1
Becker, rf.... 1 0 0
Doyle, lb.... 4 10
Btiodf raaa, cf 1 0 0
Murray, rt-lf 4 11
Brldwell, a.. 1 0 I
Derlin, 8b... 4 0 1
Metkle. lb... 4 1 It
Idoyara, .... 4 0 I
Crandall, p.. I 10
0 OKnabs, lb....
t IBatea. cf.....
0 OMagee, If....
1 0 Grant, lb....
1 OLuderua, lb..
1 0 boolan, aa. ...
0 OMoran, c
1 0 Stack, p
4 OKIiettler. p...
1 4
0 1
1 I
0 1
0 11
1 1
1
0 0
0 0
0 0
liranatleia .,
Totals 81 7 17 10 1
Totala....
BattedT for ' Suck In eighth.
New York 0 0 10 0
Philadelphia .....A. 0 10 0 0
,.11 17 11 0
1 2 0 0-4
0 0 0 1-2
Hits: Off Stack, seven lneight Innings;
off Shettler, none in one Inning. Struck
out: By Crandall, 3; y Slack, 2. Bases
on balls: Off Crandall, 2; off Stack, 3.
Two-base hit. Titus. Home runs: Merkle,
Doyle, Magee. Time: 1:40. Umpires: O'Day
and Brennan.
BOSTON DEFEATS BROOKLYN
'Loose
Playing Marks Game, with
Score Nine to Si.
BOSTON, Sept. 8. Loose base ball and
free hitting marked - the ' Boston-Brooklyn
game here this afternoon, Boston winning,
9 to . Score:
BOSTON. BROOKLYN.
AB.H.O.A.E,
AB.H.O.A.E,
Collins. If... 4 1
Heraog, lb... S
Bbean, lb.... 1
Sharps, lb.... 4 0
0 ODa.ldaon, ct. t 1 1
1 0 OOaubert, lb.. 4 1
i 4 0 Wheal, If.... 4 11
0 0 Hummel, lb. 4 0 1
I 0 IDalton, rt ... til
1 0 Lennox, 3b... 10 1
0 1 0 Stark, sa I 1 1
7 0 Bergen, I 0 1
0 1 0 a. Miller, .. 0 0 1
0 0 OBell, p 1 0
0 0 OOeaaau, P....0 0 0
R. Miller, rf I
Sweeney, as.. 1
Beck, ct I
Dmitri, a 4
Frock, p 1
Ferguson, - p.. 1
Cunla, p..... 0
'Mi-Elveen ..11
Totals. .
! 11 17 14 1 auurch 1 1 0
' Totsis 95 1 14 U 1
' natted for Bergen In the eighth.
Batted for Bell In the ninth.
Boston , 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 3 6
Brooklyn 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0
Two-base hits: Sweeney, Dalton, David
son, McAlveen, Burch. Home run: Herzog.
Hits: Off Frock, in seven and two-third
innings; off Ferguson, 0 in seven Innings;
off Dessau, 3 In one inning. Bases on balls:
Off Fiook, 6: off Ferguson, 2; off Bell, 1;
off Deastu, I. Struck out: By Fro. k. 2;
by Bell, 1; oy Desau, 1; by Curtis, 2. Time:
1.3. Umpires: Klein and Kane.
Waaaa Wlas aad Loses.
WAU8A, Neb., Sept. S.-(Spr clal.)-In the
first game of the double-header here the
Shepardaons' of 80c City won from Oakland
by a store of 12 to 0. They lost the second
to Wauaa by a score of to 8. Score:
R.H K.
VVsusa 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 0 13 (,
bhesi'srdsona 0300001 2 00 8 8
Batteries: jonnson, Dllts, Storm and
Johnson; Shepardaons, Hoyt and Turner,
Keefe and PaJmqulst.
I
tea
ATHLETICS HELD TO ONE RUN
Johnson Puzzles Visitors and Their
Hits Are Pew.
EIGHT SAFE ONES FOR LOCALS
Washlnsiton Secures Three Tallies
I nglanh Lands Oae Thrcp-llase
lilt Lord and F.lberfeld
Get Two-naEKi.'
WASHINGTON, Sept. 8. Walter Johnson
was a big puzzle to the Phtladelphlans this
afternoon and Washington won, 3 to 1.
WA9HINOTON. PHILADELPHIA.
AB.H.O.A.K, AB.H.O.A.K.
Milan, ct I 1 0 Ol.orrl, II..... 4 10 0
Kllllfer, Sb.. 4 1
I 1 Oldrlnt, rt... 4 0 0
0 0
Conroy, If.... 10 1
GeaRler, H... 1 1 1
McBrlite, aa.. Ill
Klberfeld, a. 1 1 1
Unglaub, lb.. 1 1 12
Beckendorf. c I 0 f
John awn, p... 1 0 0
0 OCollina, Sb.
0 0 Maker, lb..,
1 filHylt. lb...
0 0 Murphy. If.
0 0 Harry, aa. ..
U OMrlnnea, aa
Ol'bomas. c.
4 0 1
1 0
1 0
114
a 1
sos
10 1
0 0 0
10 1
10 0
10 0
1 0 o
0 0 0
10 0
1 0 -0
0
Lapp, t
Totala W I 17 11
1 Bender, p..
- Krsuae, p.
liygert, p.
Ilartael ..
Houaer ...
Totala 30 1 14 U 1
Batted for Barry In the eighth.
Batted for Thomas In the eighth.
Washington 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3
Philadelphia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 01
Two-base hits: Lord. Klberfeld. Three
base hits: I'nslaub. HltB: Off Br-nder, 4
In three innings; off Krause, 4 In four in
nings. Bases on balls: off K ratine, 1.
Struck out: By Johnson, 8; by Bender, 2.
lime: 1:46. UniDlres: Connolly and Colli-
flower.
WHITE SOX AGAIN SECOND BEST
Tig-era Take Game Called In Sixth on
Account of Italn.
DETROIT. Sept. 8. Detroit again de
feated Chicago today, the score being 4 to
20 The greater part of the game was plnyed
In a downpour of aln, which became ao
bad In the last half of the sixth that Um
pire Egan called a halt. Score:
DETROIT. . CHICAUO.
AB.H.O.VK. AB.H.O.A.E.
D. Jonea, It, i t 0 1 OMrCon'll, lb 1 1 1 1 1
Del' hunt y, 2b I I a 1 1 Ivnnl, 3b i
1 0
Cobb, cf 1 2 1 0 OMeloan, rf... 1
0 0
Crawford, rf. J 1 0 0 G Dougherty, If 1
0 1
Morlarty, lb.l 1 1 vzelrjer, so.... I
Buah, aa 1 0 14 OTannehlll. lb S
T. Jones, lb. 1 1 0 Ocolllne. cf... 1
Brhmldt, 0... 1 0 S 0 OZwtlllnc, cf.. 0
Fernoll, p.... 1 0 0 1 0 Payne, t 1
Olmetead, p.. 1
1 1
0 0
1 0
0 0
1 0
3 0
Totals 11 118 111
Totala 23 1 15 ll 4
Chicago 001001-2
Detroit I 0 0 8 0 4..
Two-base hit: Morlarty. Three-base hit:
Meloan. Bases on balls: Off Pernoll. 1.
Struck out: By Pernoll, 2; by Olmstead, 1.
Time: 1:04. Umpires: Egan and O'Loughlln,
LAKE IS POUNDED FOR FAIR
Fifteen Hits Are Secured Off Him tn
Six knniuajs.
CLEVELAND, Sept. 3. Cleveland de
feated St. Louts, 12 to 4, knocking Lake out
of the box. Easterly's batting featured.
Score:
CLEVBI-AND. . ST. LOUIS.
AB.H.O.A.E. AB.H.O.A.E.
Oraney, If... t 2 4 1 OTruesdals," lb 4 1 1 4 0
Btorall, lb... 6 1 1 0 OBtone, U 1 0 0 0
Turner, lb... t 111 ONewnam, lb. 4 011 0 0
Lajole, lb.... 4 10 Cflrlme. as...'. 4 0141
Eeeterly. rt.. & 4 10 OHartiell, lb.. 4 0 10 0
Dlrm'h'm, cf 1 1 0 Hoffman, (cf. 1 1 0 0 0
Knaupp, aa... I 111 lgc'weltzer, rf 1 1 0 0 0
Land, c. S 15 1 0 Stephana, c. . 4 0 t 0 0
Kaler, p 0 0 0 OLake, p I 0 0 11
Crlaa. p 2 10 10
Totala... ...41 181771
Totals 35 14 12 1
Cleveland 2 0 1 0 4 3 1 1 '-12
St. Louis OOO00O4OO4
Two-base hits: Grancy. I.n.lote, Birming
ham, Stone (2), Criss, Schweitzer. Three
base hit: Knapp. Stolen hasea: Turner
(2), Graney, Stovall, Birmingham. Double
plays: Graney to Stovall, Griggs to Trues
dale to Newman. Hits: Off Lake, 15 in
six Innings; off Criss. 3 In two Innings.
First base on balls: Oft Kaler, 4; off. Lake,
1; off Criss, 1. Struck out: By Kaler, 4:
by Lake, 4; by Criss, 2. Firt base on
errors: Cleveland, 2;' St. Louis, 1. Left on
bases: Cleveland. 9; St Louis, 8. Timt:
1:40. Umpire: Evans.
Superior Takes
One at Red Cloud;
Loses the Other
Even Break on Double-Header, Last
Game Being1 Shutout Hastings
Defeats Kearney.
RED CLOUD, Neb., Sept 8. (Special
Telegram.) Superior and Red Cloud broke
even on a double-header here today, Red
pioud winning the first game by the score
of 7' to 2; and Superior winning the second
game by the score of 1 to 0. Score, first
game: ' It il.H
Superior 00002000 0-2 7 1
Red Cloud 3 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 I 10 4
Batteries: Superior, Gibbon and Speil
mon; Red! Cloud, Masters and Moss.
Struck out: By Gibson, 4; by Masters, i.
Base on balls: Off Gibson, 2: off Maotera,
1. Three-base hit: Allen. Double play:
Clark to Clark to Blue. Time: 1:30. Um
pires; Snyder and Ellis.
Score, second game: R.H.E.
Superior 0 S 0 0 0 0 02 4 2
Red Cloud 000000 00 3 1
Batteries: Suporior, Ellis and Spcllmon;
Red Cloud, Snyder and Moss. Struck out:
By Ellis, 0; by Snyder, 5. Time: 1.00. Um
pires: Gibson and Masters.
HASTINGS, Neb., Spt 8. (Special Tele
gram.) Hastings wound up the home ser
ies today by defeating Kearney, 8 to 3.
After four hits were made off Wright Ir.
the sixth, Towtneend took the reverse end
of the battery and waa touched for two
more. Smith got a triple and two-baggers
were drawn by Townsend Gray, Donnelly
and Gaarde. Score: R.H.E.
Kearney 0 00 0 2 00 1 0-3 6 1
Hastings 1 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 S 10 1
Batteries: Kearney, Wright, Townscr.d
and Magerkurth; Hautlng, ileirick and
Gaarde.
BALL CARNIVAL AT BENSON
Several Games Are Scheduled for
Sunday and Monday.
Benson will have a series of ball games
for Sunday and Labor day, in which several
of the bent amateur teams In the city will
participate. All the games -a ill be played
en the Krug park diamond east of the park
entrance. .
The schedule la as follows: Sunday at 2
o'clock the J. S. Cross team agaliikt the
Columbian, at 3:30 the Bonsou Eagles
against the E'arrella. On Monday afternoon
at 2 o'clock tha Cross team will meet the
Huffman of South Omaha and in the sec
ond game the Benson Eagles will meet the
Uollys. Ladles will be admitted free.
White Outpuluts Coaler.
MILWAUKEE. Wis., Sept. 3. Charley
While of Chicago, outpointed Frankie Con
ley of Kenooha, in a ten round, no decision
bout before the Badger Athletic club to
night. All the clean work was done by Wh.te,
from start to finish. Conli-y, while the
aggrtssor did nothing but muss It mid was
culled by the referee In the fourth round
for hi wrestling tactics.
COACH KING COLE
FACES ME-AL TEST
Must Turn Out a Championship Team
( or Lose His Prestige at
Lincoln,
v
CRITICISM HAS HTJRT COACH
Will Have Good Material on Hand
for a Team.
ALL EYES ARE NOW ON HTM
Students Are Watching a Chance to
Find Fault.
HAD LACK OF GOOD SYSTEM
tudera-raduatcs of Nebraska l'"l
versltr Dissatisfied with Shovrii.R
of Coach, but He Has Miulo
Good Record.
Develpoments In Nebraska foot unit this
fall will be clely watched by C01 nhusker
alumni, western coaches and followers of
the game in this section of the country.
Coach "King" Cole, who already ha guided
the Cornhusker team in three seasons of
varying success, will be on trial. H Is tha
expressed opinion of the alumni and under
graduates of the Lincoln school that "King '
Cole fulled to get the results last fall that
the material warranted. To hlB re-election
for this season there was considerable op
position, and the Nebraska board of control
was petitioned to secure the services of an
other man for 1910. WiBhes of the students
and alumni were given little heed and
Coach Cole was given another lease on life.
Upon his return "King" Vill find that hla
work must be In an atmosphere bearing
rather a heavy prejudice against him.
Despite the general dissatisfaction with
Coach Cole's work of last fall, there Is little
basis for the adverse criticism of his in
struction. Nebraska's eleven was a failure
last autumn; this fact Is admitted, but
there were circumstances over which the
conch had no control that made the season
a dlHappointment. The student body did
not have the material among Its number
to give Cole the men to produce a winning
team. There were plenty of strong players
tor, the line, and Cole turned out a set of
forwards that equaled anything In the Mis
souri valley. Timber for the backfleld was
scarce and the offense of the Cornhuskers
was weak throughout the whole autumn be
cause of this condition. -,The line did good
work on the offense, so far as It was poa- ,
Bible for tha forwards to play In the at
tack, -but the men In the backfleld were not
of the caliber that makes a winning team.
In several games of the fall It was demon
strated that Cole had produced a. line that
was one of the best Nebraska ever had.
In these same games It waa also proved
that the backs wefra not up to the standard
of Cornhusker football.
Small Opportunity.
Though there waa a paucity of material
when tho . season opened last September
and little opportunity for a coach to show
his skill, the followers of the game at
Nebraska launched forth - In criticism of
Cole's work without . doing the Michigan
man justice.' They forgot that he had given
Nebraska a champion eleven in the first
fall that he coached In Llnooln. That year,
1S07, he formed an eleven that defeated
Kansas and held Minnesota to an S to S
score. The next season he brought out A
team that suffered defeat at the hands of
Kansas, not through any lack of coaching,
but because of a schedule that would have
caused the downfall of the best eleven lit
tho country. There were two, seasons, lflo7
and 190E, that ' King" Colo coached two of
the strongest teams that the Comhuekev
school had supported since the fertile days
of Coach) "lunnniy" Booth, tho man "who
placed Nebraska on tho foot ball map."
Colo's critics overlooked the good points
of the Michigan matt In tho tirade they
registered against him after the closa of
I tha season last year.
1 In tho loco of the strong opposition to
Coin among tho men rooet deeply Interested!
in Nebraska foot ball, his re-election by tha
Cornhusker board of ccnttol by a unani
mous vote may be takon as a protty strousl
testimonial as to what the men In contrsjl
t.f athletics at the Cornhusker Institution
think of "King"' Colo. There were several
other coaches vh-.m they cculd have so
cured' but Cole, In their estimation had
proved his worth, so he was the choice
above all tho oihor applicants for the posi
tion. Tho Nebraska mentors had and lave
faith In , tho ability of "King" Colo to
prcduco a winning oleven when ho has tha
material with which to wist It.
Thci wcro tpou ,11 the play of tha Ne
braska eleven last tall that probaol
could have been strengthened without tho
aid of any new men. It was a weakness
la Cole's system that he did not remedy
these places, bjt then every cocc.'i has
hla faults, and it was only natural thaS
Colo could fall In some things. His
li.tii tcienco and tackling methods were
not tho best, roar tackling cost the Corn
h'.iikera dearly both In 1108 and I'M). Iu
the Ki-.iisan game last fall tho Inexcusable
tncklir.g of c few of tho men permitted
Kantas to make the only . score of tha
gams and win a contest that should have
been Nebraska's.', In the offenso of tha
men thore rvas lacking a well-organlxed
Interference. Tha failure to dovelop a
successful Interference undoubtedly was
the main weakness in Colo's system ot
play.
pit Slyle Game.
Tfyls fall, with pulling and pushing of
pl.tyera abolished, interference will be an
important factor In the offensive play of
tho teama, more Important, probably, than
ever before In the history of the ga.ns.
The manner in which Cole handles tits
situation In creating offensive plays and
interference will bo closely watched. It
he can get a plan of Intcrfcrenco that will
permit his backs to gain ground he will
dlxariii many of his critics.
With the flying tsckle forbidden this
fall, the critics of the Nebraska eoaoli
will nut be able to censure lilin for not
making his men leave their feet In order
to bring a man to the ground. During tha
pu-ht three years (hs Cornhuskers liava
had several men who could tackle well
from a standing position, but none wbs
could do the flying tackle act with any,
treat amount of suovess. By ths abolish
merit of the flying tackle the Cornhuskers
should benefit. It. roust be sold la Justi
fication of "Kins' Cole that he tried tq
Uach his pupils how to tackle, and specs)
many hours each week In trying to gat las)

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