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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 05, 1913, Image 8

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THE BEE: OMAHA, MONDAY, MAT 5, 1913.
he
ee'
rr
To an Expectant Mother:
By KJiTiA WHEELER WIIiOOX.
Copyright, 1913. by Amerlcan-Journnl-
Exnmlner.
To an expectant mother:
You telt mo another child U coming;
und that you are worried; and sorry for
yourself.
It does not seem to enter your mind
tl-nt you are form-
Inn tho nature ot
your child by your
rroods; nnd that
you have an obli
gation resting upon
you to use will
power, self control
lirayer and faith
whits this helpless
being Is being car
ried under your
heart
You are bu'.ldlnit
something which
will mean good or
etfl for tho world
for time and eter
nity. Vou are bringing Into existence u human
being.
Such a colossal thought ought to take
ouch complete possession of you that
nothing petty, nothing gloomy, nothing
elfish, nothing less than greatness and
Blory could enter your mind.
That child now under, your heart has
lived many times beforo on earth. It
will como with many Impulses and tend,
encles brought over from old Incarnation,
and many others from ancestors of your
own and the ancestors of tho father.
Dut greater than all theso Impulses and
tendencies Is the mind of the mother to
mould mid shnpo that' child Into what It
Mill l.
If you t-eallxe how wonderful Is the
work given to do, and how far reaching
will be the results of how you do It, a
great awo will fall upon you, with a ttetat
exaltation.
You will fall on your Knees, and lift
your faco to the Invisible Helpers and
cry out; "Creator, God, and ill holy
Friendship,
"Did you hear him say that ho could
have shed his heart's blood for mo?"
"Do you .want onv blrtcrt shed for ynu"
replied his friend with considerable Irri
tation. "Dues he shed anything for you
that ydu do want Does he shed em
ployment for you, Instruction for you,
pocket money for you? Docs he evsn
shed legs of mutton for you In any de
cent proportion t potator and enrdon
Bluff? -MARTIN CHUZZLKW1T."
By BEATRICE FAIRFAX.
A young woman writes that she would
like to know how to make rircnds, Tho
queetlon is easier of n-ply than if she
had asked how one may keep them.
She writes that she Is lonely; that tho
finds no Joy In books, art, music, enter
tainment, or walks. She cannot enjoy
her associates because she flndi atnontf
them.no "real friends."
She Is young. Therefore. I gather that
by "real friend" she means some one to
whom she may pour out all her llttlo
hopes, ambitions and sorrows, and bo as
sured of encouragement, sympathy and
silence. 8ho wants, in other words, to
find some one who is a sofa pillow on
the surface and a steel vault underneath.
She would lay her weary head on such
sdfa pillow and pour Into tt all that
her heart holds and longs for, believing
lifer confession wilt seep, through to tho
tcel vault, there to He safe and sacred
till the end of time. x
You poor little girl' You havo yet to
learn that so many are sofa pillows on
the ..exterior and as porous ns spongea
underneath, and that a confession poured
Into them seeps through, not to a safety
vault, but Into the ears of others.
You have yet to know the difference
between a sympathetic car And an In
quisitive one.' You have not reached that
rage in the book of experience on which
this motto is found: "Thy friend hath
& friend. Thy friend's friend hath a
friend. Therefore beware!"
The craving for friends is natural, but
Jn youth one exaggerates .the need ot
friends. Just aa one exaggerates the value
of friends when found. It is a realm
where nine-tenths of the coin in circula
tion Is counterfeit, and whore tho young
make a collection of counterfeit coin, and
Jingle it proudly.
"Look," they ay In effect, "See how
many friends I have! I have mora than
anybody."
In the same realm, the old clutch
tenaciously to the genuine; some with
only one or two coins in their hands,
And many are empty handed! )
You would make friends, little girl?
Make a foundation of the word sacrifice.
On it build every friendship!
Put self In the background. You may
"Cascarets" Best
Bowel Cleanser
No lyilousncs. Headache, Sick, Boar
Stomach, Indigestion, Coated
Tongue or Constipation.
Furred Tongue, Bed Taste. Jndlges
tion. Sallow Bkln and Miserable Head
ache come from a torpid liver and
clogged bowels, which cause your stoni
ach to become filled with undigested
food, which sours and ferment Ilk
garbage in a awill barrel That's the
first step to untold misery Indigestion,
foul gaaea, bad breath, yellow skin, men
tal fears, everything that Is horrible
and nauseating. A Cascaret tonight will
Kive your constipated bowels a thorough
cltatwlB; straighten you out by
inrl. They work while you sleep
a l-ct koi from your druggist will
keep yw eUng good for ninths, Mil
lies of man and' women take a Caa
caret bow and then to keep their atom
acfa, liver and bowel regulated, and
never lwow a miserable moment. Don't
fersjet tfee chU4rn their little lnaldo
need a fpod, gentle cUanrirtg, too. Ad-
r ; : ;
I How to Make-Friends , J
Such a Colossal Thought Should So
Possess You That Nothing Petty, or
Gloomy Could Enter Your Mind. :
angels and Intelligences In the worlds
and systems of worlds about and beyond
me, help me to be Worthy of this mighty
mission of motherhood with which I am
Invested, endowed. Thrill me, .stir me,
enlighten mo with wisdom; give me the
light and guidance, and show mo the
way to glvo to the world a perfect
child."
ThU prayer will be from tho depths of
your being, and It will bo repeated every
day, and you will fall asleep at night
with the words on your lips.
Then you will guard yourself from all
evil thinking or speaking, from gloomy
or depressing thoughts; because you wilt
know that one who so respects tho mis
sion entrusted to her, and who so be
lieves In her great responsibility will be
. guarded and helped over alt the hard
places by tho Dlvlno Guides, who aro
ever about us.
You will avoid looking at tho ugly, the
deformed or tho repulsive things of earth.
You will rend no talcs of crime and allow
no one to talk such things to you, because
you wilt not want to Pass on to your
unborn child anything but the beautiful,
healthful and Inspiring things of life.
You wilt read good books, books or
biographies of noble lives, books ot brave
and noblo deeds, and you will listen to
sood music, and go Into churches and
galleries, and see boautlful pictures, or
walk In woods and fields nnd look at
beautiful nature.
And always will there be the prayer
and faith In your heart that brjngs tho
Invisible) Helpers near.
You wilt believe that a great soul Is
coming to earth through you, a soul that
will be helpful, and happy, and that will
bring the best Joy Into your own life that
tt has evor known.
And with all your heart and mind and
mental and spiritual powers you will lovo
this baby hidden away under your heart;
and you will be brave and courageous
and know that all must be well with you
and It.
For such Is tho kingdom of heaven,
long to talk; keep silent that your friends
may' enjoy their voices. You may havo
opinions that aro not llko theirs. Iltrtu
them, for a difference ot opinion mean.i
an argument, and an argument where
there Is friendship becomes a dispute,
and disputes nro fatal,
You must team to bear and forebear.
You must sympathise with little woes,
and forget your own nro greater. You
must make no demands on the tlmo
of others, but be willing to glVa up all
your own.
You soy that you find no enjoyment
in books: Make friends, and tho tlmo
will come when you will wish you could
givo one hour a day to the books you nro
now neglecting.
lie avreeablo; silent when silence U
demanded; vivacious when others seek
vivacity; be discreet. And this 1 bog
Of you: When by alt of these you have
attracted others to you, that you muko
your selection among them with wise,
wtdo-opencd eyes.
Take care that you do not choosy so
many that you grow confused among
them, and forget who are your best
ones.
Be sure that your liking is based on a
liking for the one you choose, not be
cause he or she likes you. Be satisfied
that you aro not building a friendship
with B because you and B agree In
despising C,
Be friends always with yourself. And
you cannot be an honest frlepd of your
self when you have won the friendship
of another with any act ot hypocrisy or
deceit.
Advice to the Lovelorn
By BEATRICE FAIRFAX
Go Oat More, '
Dear Miss Fairfax: I am a vounr ladv
IS years of age, but have never had a
sweetheart yet, although am considered
good looking and educated.
I am a girl who likes to stay at home
and not go out much. Pleas alri cm
ii my wwr w come even it 1 stay at
noma, ANXIOUB.
You must go out occasionally. How
would you meet him otherwise?
Dorothy Dix
lijr DOROTHY DIX
Another man who began life humbly,
and who has achieved fame and fortune,
has divorced the wife of his youth be
cause he has outgrown her.
"I have gone the
way of men, the
better way," he
says frankly, "It la
the better way, be
cause it la the way
ot progrstf. A roan
of talent and am
bition must go on.
It his wife turn
mulish and balky
It is inevitable that
their way part.
The man gives tho
woman a chance.
If she refuses to
take It and to keep
pace with him. It
is her own fault
that she see him
disappearing In a
cloud ot dust.
"I gave my wife a chance to develop,
witn me. J provided enough money for
leisure for her to study and Improve her
self, to keep house better, to dress bet
ter, to mingle with people who are help
ful and stimulating. Bhe refused to take
advantage of any of the opportunities I
offered her. Hers was a case ot arrested
The Charm of Naturalness ttZJAH Eg
HISKKI CSM ' her ns her natural self- .
Jiy TjTMjTAN LAtJFKRTr.
All you pathetic little pink and whlto
would.be beuutlcs who march up and
down Fourth or Fifth avenue of a sunny
spring day don't you want tp know how
to be really pretty? Don't you want to
bo not a "gaslight" belle hut a sweet
girl who can bravo Old Sol's bright rays
in the calm assurance that he is reveal
ing beauty, not betraying beauty secrets?
Well, then be natural. Naturalness
does not seem to be the tod ot this mo
ment, but It will have Its day soon, I
think,. for we have a wonderful exponent
ot natural charm and the charm of
naturalness prominently before us now.
This is Miss Valll VuJll of "The Purple
Road." -
Aa Wanda,, the little maid of Vienna,
who lovod Napoleon wisely it too well
on the Whys and Wherefores
development. Bhe stood pat where she j
was and wanted me to stay with her.
I couldn't. I wouldn't No man can when
ho feels the ability within himself to go
on.
"1 am sorry that my wife would not
go with me. I would have preferred that
she vhould, but the inevitable has hap
pened. I had to progress, and she would
not keep step with me so I have left her.
That is all there Is to it Divorce In
such cases Is as necessary aa surgery is
In some physical diseases."
This successful man has stated a brutal
truth In a brutal way. It is the tragedy
ot achievement that so often spells do
mestic misery, for among those who sit in
th; grand stand and cheer the viator us
he wins the race, there is seldom his
wife. She. poor, dear lady, has been left
far. far behind, somewhere In the first
quarter stretch.
America leads the world in the number
of Its divorces and the amount ot its
domestic infelicity. Undoubtedly one of
the reasons of this is because we have
no fixed classes, and Such "wide" oppor
tunities that the man who bt;liu at the
' lowest rung of the social ladder not In-
! frequently ends his career on the top of
ii
This makes It Impossible for him to
know Just What qualities he will need in
a wife, and hence adds to the dangers
ot matrimony. Abroad people atay more
or less consistently in "that station ot
tar tit esoprioaf-i VaJK YfclE tr tea rr
QTffrttir. fi9othy-coDBpeCas' Hum.
"HOw do you do it?" I asked. "How
do you hold all ot us throbbing and wait
ing, as you stand in your simple gray
frock on the grand staircase in Na
poleon's palace, while all around are
magnificent women In imperially gorga
ouo clothes?" f
"Naturalness and feeling," began the
girlish star, and then broke off: "Oh.
do I hold you like. that? I went to so
I son co jtladV And thee, wc bota
latosbod at the urotndled eiMWUnu of
l pet "nalHaJnRm."
"Ah. but I da bettera tat Eaxsnalaeas
everywhere. Look natural, he natural;
and thon the great feelings can find ex
pression through you."
The dainty singing actress had perched
life to which it has pleased Heaven to
call them," aa the prayer book saya.1
Also, aa a general thing, they marry t
accordingly. If a man Is a duke he mar- '
rles a woman of his own social status, (
and who understands the duchess bust- j
nrss. on the contrary, it be is a brick
layer -he expects to be a bricklayer all
tho balance of his days, and he espouse
another bricklayer's daughter and they
live humbly and peacefully ever after.
But in America the man who began
life aa a bricklayer or on the slag pile.
and who married a woman designed by !
nature to be a bricklayer's or mechanic's
wife, not Infrequently comes to occupy
a seat in the senate or even the presi
dential chair, or he becomes a multi
millionaire with the power of a king,
and more than a king's way of -Hying.
And Mrs. Wife stays Just where she was
She would still be jin admirable washer
woman or patcher of trousers, but she
Is utterly unfitted to be the wife ot her
husband as he Is at present
Nor la she to be blamed for this. We
talk glibly "about sueiTa wom&n' keeplng1
up with such a husband. Wa might, with
equal Justice, blame" the.honr st Percherpn
draft horse for not keeping up with the
Arabian race horse, or the domestic hen
for not soaring with the eagUs. Because
nature endowed a man with genius it
does not follow that It also supplies talent
to Ids wife. Nor can a man at SO be
blamed for not having enough of the
MISS VALLI VALLI IN TWO CHARMING POSES.
In tho small picture on the left, England's exponent of
natural beauty shows an attitude of effectation which she de
pletes and continually guards against. The other pose shows
her as her natural self.
herself fearlessly under the glare of tho
low-swung incandescent lamp that re
vealedbut found nothing to betray. A
true "crowning Blory" is her coronet ot
copper-toned brown! hair, so plenti
ful that it is ' quite sufficient dower
of beauty without the addition ot a soft
pink tlushud skin and great gray eyes.
And later she told ma her simple, ef
fective method ot caring for hair and
skin; true beauty secrets till you know
how!
"Kllen Terry taught me to 'mnke-up.'
I don't use pink or white glaring high.
lights, but tho bronze, brown-red tones'
tho men of the stage employ. This Is so
much more like the tones of the human
akin. You see, to look natural on ;he
stage one has to use make-tip as the
extra ounce ot emphasis that counter
acts the glare ot the lights. That is not
needed on the street though I must con
fess to a very earnest affection for my
powder puff. As a finish .to dust off
the little shine from the active oil glands
of a healthy skin powder Is Invaluable,
I -think."
of Marriage Incompatibility
spirit ot prophesy to know the sort ot
a wife he is going to need at SO.
That a gifted husband should outgrow
his commonplace wife is very sad. It
is also very sad when a gifted woman
outgrows her commonplace husband. Yet
the one happens as often as, the other,
and there is no more significant difference
between the sexes than the way In which
men and women meet this catastrophe In
Uielr lives.
' When a man realizes that he haa out
grown his wife, that she no longer speaks
his language, nor shares his thoughts,
and that It is as tedious to explain things
to her as it is to a child, he Is at first
impatent and then contemptuous of her.
Then he begins to neglect her. and seek
the companionship of women who be
long to the new world Into which he has
passed, and which he knows his wife can
never rtally enter.
It he Is a man with a "high sense of
duty he tries to make up to' her .for his
lack or etfection by giving her money. If
he has the courago of .his desires he pen
sions her and divorces her. But in any
case she is really as dead to him as if
the sod covered her face.
The woman who has outgrown her hus
band suffers all that the man does who
has outgrown his wife, and more, because
a woman loves to look up to htr husband,
she loves to admire him, and when the
Urns come that she can no longer do
..J
"But how keep the skin healthy when
grease, paint and rougo must be applied
so often?" I asked.
There was a low-throated little English
laogh. "I know a wonderful skin food or
tonlo or whatever you call It over here.
Soap and water. The best of soap and
plenty of water.
"Grease, paint and rouse have been
going on my face since I was 7 years old,
tor then little Vain doubled the first
name she had been given In honor of a
dear uncle and good Bt. Valentine, whose
birthday was Just three days from hers
and went on the stage. I have been put
ting stage make-up on for sixteen years."
"Soopl On your face?" I exclaimed.
"Ratherl Heaps of it, I scrub and
scrub and then I go after any stray dust
or rougo with a bit of good cream and
then water, water, first quantities of hot
and then-a dash or two of cold."
"You are truly a "water baby,' aren't
you?" said the lntervfower, making a
mental note to acquire Just, such a skin
If water plus soap could do It.
"Indeed, yes. My hair, too I wash it
once every week, and I don't crimp or
wave. I briiBh and brush till every hair
Is alive and then, since it's all soft and
clean It looks well."
And It looks marvelously well sisters of
crimps and marcel waves and monthly
shampoos. It Is fresh and clean and
natural and vital, In ' keeping with the
wholesome girt whose small, well-posed
head It crowns.
"Of course you add fresh air to water
as a' tonic since you're English," said I,
sure of my ground here.
"You're quite right; I do. I love out
doors, alt outdoors and gardens. "Ah I
that la the one thing I miss over here,
You live in hotels and apartments. At
homo we have houses and gardens and
so I may havo flowers and dogs and the
healthy, homey things I low."
And she said It with the sweet natural
ness that makes this charming little fresh
air, soap and water English girl even
prettier off the stage than on it.
so, hers Is the agony of the worshipper
whose Idol is shattered and whose God
has proved -to have feet of clay.
But she hides her loneliness In her own
heart. She keeps her 'dull husband from
finding out how he wearies her, she velln
his Imperfections from her friends, and
keeps her children from suspecting that,
she is their father's superior. Sheanimater
the clod without the clod even guessing
whence comes Its power.
More than that often and often, she
refuses to run tho race because she
knows that her husband cannot keep the
pace with her. There are untold brilliant
women who turn their backs upon glori
ous careers because it. would mean the
wrecking of their homesT"
It Is only In rare cases that the woman
who outgrows her husband seeks solace
for it In the society ot the man who Is
a fitting mate for her maturer intellect
She . deliberately fills In her life with
Interests that bring her nearer to her
husband, Instead ot taking her farther
from him, and she stays her footsteps
to his slow gait so that they can Jog
along together.
It Is always a trdgedy when either
husband or wlfo outgrows the other, but
when It happens the man usually sacri
fices his wife, while the woman offers up
herself on the altar.
Flowers in the City I
By GARRKTT V. SERVIS8.
I count sixteen backyards from the rear
window where I sit writing, and in only
one of them do I sec any flowers, and
that Is one of tho smallest and least
favorably located.
Yet Its owner has
managed so skil
fully with the
clothes lines that
ho has plenty of
room to cultivate
his plants. At pres
ent most of them
are only shoots and
ehrubs, refreshing
by their greenness;
but I know that a
month or two later
they will be all In
bloom, sending
their perfumes up
into my open window at every stir of
tho breeze.
If all his neighbors would do what this
man does, those sixteen backyavdB would
bo sixteen flower gardens whose beauty
would call all the Inhabitants of the block
to sit, by preference, at their rear win
dows, enjoying them. Hie air would be
sweetened, the sight delighted, nnd tho
weary stateness of city life for at least
100 personB relieved.
The soil In that -particular yard is natur
ally no better than In tho others. But
the lover of flowers, at a very slight cost
In dollars, has fertilized it. He has taken
away all the rubbish. He has laid out
walks In an area only twenty feet square,
set a flower urn in the center, run bands
of cultivation round nil the sides, drawn
green triangles with floral perimeters In
the middle space, and the effect Is to
make tho area scorn twlco as cxtonslvo ns
It did before.
He has dealt so persuasively with tho
soil that It bears plants right-up against
tho brick walls on two sides, and tho
board fences on the other two. Not an
inch is lost.-
I know, from .experience, that by Juno
that little backyard will be an ambrosial
garden which Italy might envy. Mornlnfr
after morning I see the creator nt work
In It, beforo he goes to his bread-winning
labor elsewhere. On Sundays ho
works there with a beaming face, which
shows how his tired brain revels In such
recreation.
Flowers were not made for man, but
man was made for flowers. If he shuts
his nature against them he descends In
the moral scale. There was once a man,
driven to desperation by hard fortune,
who scaled a fence at night and stole,
ontlp-toe, with a case-knife in his hand,
toward the "side windows ot a costly
residence which he had made up his mind
to enter and rob.
He persuaded himself that his necessity
Justified his transgression. But as he
cautiously crept across tho plots and
along tho paths a little night breeze
arose, and borne upon it there came to
him from all sides tho dellcato odors of
many kinds ot flowers.
Ho stopped llko one thunder-struck. Ho
threw down his knife and thanked God
that chance had led him into that garden
before crime had- stained him; for with
the fragrance of the flowers there re
turned to him the memory of his mother,
and he. saw her again tending the rosea
that grew under his window when he was
a boy. For a few minutes he breathed
the perfume, and then; with mind cleared
and heart strengthened, ho retraced his
steps to face the world in a better mood.
Everybody can becomo a cultivator of
flowers who has the least bit of soil at
his disposal. If you cannot live In the
country in the summer, you can, at least
make flowers bloom in a city backyard.
But If you have a llttlo suburban garden
you may on a small scale Imitate Luther
Burbank himself, making flowers obey
you by taking the hues and shapes that
you prefer.
April Is the time to begin. It Is the
morning of the year.
Failure in flower raising is due prin
cipally to two things first to neglect of
the soil, which needs enriching and fer
tilizing and, second, to neglect of the
noxious insects, plant lice and various
kinds of bugs that devour the buda and
blooms.
All Insects are not lnqurtous, and many
are the best of friends to your flowers,
without whose ministrations they could
hardly exist By cultivating a little gar
den of flowers you will learn, with ease
and pleasure two sciences botany and
entomology which you cannot learn from
books.
It Is for their Insect friends, naturalists
say, that the flowers make themselves
beautiful and odoriferous. Exquisite but
terflies, pf more kinds than you thought
existed, will fill your little garden with
the flutter of colored wings, drawn there
by the flowers. Watch their method of
getting nectar, but do not drive them
away. The nectar was poured into the
flower cups for them.
Bees will come, on the waves of the
air, which they alone know, making a
busy; humming mart of your garden, and
fertilizing the flowers by bearing golden
loads of pollen from blossom to blossom
on their powdered legs. Once in a while
a Jeweled humming bird will pay a -swift
visit to the place, darting from blosBom(
to blossom, and hanging suspended on
misty wings, while It dips its long beak
into the rich chalices.
Your garden, however small, will be a
little world astir with so much life that
you may grow wise In studying It It
will be worth to you and your children a
thousand times its cost.
TTIE VORKINGSIANS FOOD
The man who toils hard all day
needs strengthening food. A lot ot
meat Is not essential to nourish and
sustain the system.
A 10c package of Faust Spa
ghetti contains more nutrition than
4 lbs. of beef. Faust Spaghetti la
made from Durum Wheat, the cereal
that overflows in gluten the food
content that makes muscle, bono
and flesh.
Faust Spaghetti c,osts ono-tentb,
the price of meat contains moro
nutrition Is easier digested and
makes a savory, appetizing dish.
Write for free recipe book. Sold
In 5c and 10c packages at all
grocers'.
V MAULTj RROS.
St. Louis, Mo.

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