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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, May 06, 1913, Daily Sport Extra, Image 6

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THE BEE: OMAHA, TUESDAY, MAY 6, 1913.
The Omaha daily bee
yh luu ya" " -
"rininrorf nt Omaha nostofflco as second-
tiaes matter.
.r mintinniiyrmNi
Sunday Dee, one year
Faturday Bee, one rear ifS
Dally Dee. without Sunday, one ear.. w
Dally Bee. and Sunday, one year 6.W
DEMVEHKD BY CAIlMBn.
Evening and Sunday, per rnonlh......40c
Evening, without Sunday, per month.. c
Dallr Hee, Including Sunday, per mo..w
Dolly Bee, without Sunday. per mo. ...c
Address Bit complaint of irregularities
In delivery to rtty Circulation Dept.
"ttetnlt by draft, express or postal order,
payable to The Bco PubllshlnB company.
Only 5-eent stamps received l Wnw
of small accounts. Personal checks, ox
cept, on Omaha and eastern exchange, not
acceptea.
mf'f.Mr'isfltr
Omaha The Bee bulldlnR.
South Omaha-18 N Street.
Council Bluffs-It North Main street
Incoln-28 Little bulldlnn.
Chicago 1011 Marquette bulldlns.
New York-IKW 2S Fifth Ave.
8t. Louls-503 Now Dank of Commerce.
tVashlnston-72 Fourteenth St. N. V.
Communications relatlntt to news and
editorial matter should be addressed
Omaha Bee, Editorial department
APRIL CinCULATlON.
50,106
Btate of Nebraska, County of Douglas, ss:
Dwlght Williams, circulation manager
St The Bee publishing -company, belnr
uly sworn, says that tho avetuge dally
circulation for the month of April, 1V13,
aa 60,108. mVlOHT WILLIAMS,
Circulation Manager.
Subscribed In my presence and sworn
to beforo me this 2d day of May, 1913.
ROBERT HUNTER,
(Seal) Notary labile.
Subscribers lenvlnR the rllr
tcmpdrarlly alionld hnve The Ileo
mntleil la (hem. AUrtrmn ivlll be
changed nn often h requested.
Tor Bottor Juries' says a
Jhcadllno. Second tho motion.
Tho restoration committees havo
lso learned that hasto makes
iwnsto.
St. Louis Is said to havo. a
haunted houso. Is it tho old Four
.Courts?
Many a golf. player would, doubt
Jess, llko to put tho cnddlo on1 tho
Jroo list.
Fall styles of women's dress are,
the modistes say, to bo tho same,
only worse.
Governor Hiram Johnson treads
nolally and carries a small stick. St.
Xouls Post-Dispatch.
A Bmall Btlck?
' Sir Cecil Arthur Sprlng-Mco has.
como to tako tho place of James
Sryco. What's In a name?
Today is oloctlon, day for Bouth
Omaha. Tho voters can also inako
It a clean-up day it thoy want to.
Governor MWohead will not bo so
.popular with tho plo hunters after
tho political pastry has all been dls
trlbuted.
You cannot Judgo tho financial
standing of tho husband by tho hat
his wlfo wears. Ho may havo a
"weak volco.
Iowa boasts of a "real daughter
of tho Revolution," What docs No
tiroska caro, so long as it has tho
real "princo of peace."
A Japanese aviator met accidental
death in San Francisco, but will his
honorable country accept our word
for its being an accident?
t
That plentiful willingness to no
cept tho now Job of election commis-
elonor la Omaha only goes to show
how many unselfish patriots remain
in our midst.
According to dispatches tho
Montenegrin cabinet has resigned.
How considerate of the press agent
Bet to Insist on sending all their In
dividual names.
Somalia tahnp rAnrAsnntnllvna hnvn
gone on record against any "form of
municipal civil service. Somo things
j&ro hard to account for, and this is
one of them. '
The late Will Oarloton's cstato
was found upon Inventory to fall
75 cents short of his dobts. This
ought to secure htm a rank among
old-Umo poets.
The Fremont Tribune says that
if we will put our ear to the ground
!we will hear something about the
Platto river power canal. Wo are
listening with both ears,
t
Secretary Bryan wired back on
the day of arrival that ho was Vop
tlmietic" of the Sacramento situa
tion. Mr, Bryan's optimism has led
him astray so often that it is no
longer infectious.
The Wateit board started out
with the public announcement that
jjo reduction in rates would be made
for two years. The Bee's campaign
tot lower rates is making them
$hange their minds.
The innocent bystander's fears
must be allayed by the facts, as
shown from tho record, that the
Japanese population as well as land
tenure la California are diminishing
instead of increasing.
Psychologist have solved many
difficult problems, but they have
never explained how it ia that a
ball team can lose almost every
game away from home, and then
Mart In. and w?a the minute it lands
is 1U own back yard,
Still a Third Way.
The Water board can do one of two
things. It can keep up the high charges
for water indefinitely and use the profits
thereon to pay for extensions. Or It can
tax the cost of extensions to tho prop
erty directly benefited. Water board
organ.
Yes, but there Is n third way of
taking caro of needed extensions,
and that Is to pay for the now mains
In tho snmo way as tho old malnB,
namoly, out of tho proceeds of tho
$7,000,000 of water bondB already
sold, which, when votod, woro ex
pressly declared to bo to pay for ex
tensions, as well nB to buy the exist
ing plant. There is no possible way
of figuring that assessing abutters
on ono street for pipe extensions,
but not abutters on the next street,
Is not double taxation and unjust
discrimination.
ThevMareillaise.
Somo humorist in tho ranks must
have suggested tho Marseillaise ns
tho official hymn of tho Amorlcan
militant suffragists. 60 far as ap
propriateness Is concerned, it does
about as well as John Brown's Body,
The Marscillaiso is known as tho
martial air of tho French revolution
and tho anthem of freedom for suc
ceeding movoments of liberation, not
only in France, but also othor Euro
pean countries. ' But what possiblo
relation can there bo botweon tho
conditions that inspired and per
potuatod this thrilling tuno and
(hoso of tho Amorlcan woman Book
ing tho ballot? Tho progress they
havo thus far attained has been
without tho aid of burlosquo, brick
bats, or battlo cries, and wo aro Just
now witnessing nn objoct lesson of
(ho futility of such spectacular fea
tures as drawing cards abroad.
Rieht You Are.
Tlecently the public school children
have been canvassing the city In effort
to sell tickets for soma kind of a show
Whph somebody Is going to give. I be
Jievo tho school authorities mako a mls-
hko wucnnver tney mix any financial
duals of this kind with tho educational
system. Thd average parent does not
want his child to go out and beg men
and women to buy such tickets. As a
rule the man who buys has no thauirht
of Using tho tickets, but buys them sim
ply to pleaso the boy or girl who offers
thorn for sale. It Is a species of hold-up
Camo Which Should not loniror nrnvnJI In
tho schools. Columbus Telegram.
Right you aro, And it is an abuse
that ought not to bo permitted in tho
public schools anywhere
Horo in Omaha it Is against the
rules for school children to poddlo
tickets for school entertainments,
but tho rulos uomotimo fall Into
innocuous dosuotudo, Tho machinery
of tho public schools Bhould not bo
tiBOd to promote private financial or
gift enterprises of any kind.
The Filiblno's Traditions.
Kipling wrote ns part of an intro
ductory to a chapter In ono of his
volumes this verso:
Now it Is not good for tho Christian's
Health to hustle tho Aryan brown;
For tho Christian riles and the Aryan
. smiles and ho wearcth tho Christian
down: ,
And the end of the fight In a tombstone
white, with tho name of the late de
ceased! And. the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here
who tried to hust 0 the east"
Figuratively, somo such unhannv
ending might ensue If our friends,
tho democrats, should nttomnt to
precipitate progross In tho nrt of
solf-govornmont in the PhillnDlnes
Tho United States whllo under re
publican rulo, was forced into thoso
islands and having accented tho fate
of destiny, did tho very best it could
for tho moral, social, intellectual
and s commercial welfare of tho noo
plo. with tho result that conditions
aro bo much bottor than at tho time
01 .OUr OCCUIiatton nft tn nffor nn nn,.
siblo basis of comparison, The gov
ernment has not been In a hurry to
completo what In a very solnmn
mood It conceived to be 'its duty to
ward the Filipinos, realizing that
amy to do ono of destiny. And If
tho democrats aro wise thoy will
pursue tho same course, romember
lpg, as polntod out by a writer In the
Atlantic Monthly, "the fact that, tho
dominant dements of tho Filinlno's
character havo been formed by the
traditions of millenniums of barbar
ism, In which political experience
had no place." To say that fifteen
years Is sufficient time in which to
teach Buch a people the art of relf
government Is to travestlze a grave
responsibility. Tho wonder is that
tho Filipinos have responded so well
to our beneficent efforts.
Never Again.
One ot the good things done by
the late Nebraska legislature was to
make it unlawful for a murderer to
be tho beneficiary of an insurance
policy on the life ot his victim. In
other words, hereafter if a nerson
murders another in Nebraska to get
the life insurance, he won't get it,
and we will nevor again have an
other example of a convict pardoned
out ot the penitentiary collecting
money from an insurance company
in consequence of tho murder. If
there are othor Btates where this
scandal has happened, or could hap
pen, we commend NebraBka'a new
law to them.
Prospect are that several law
enacted by the Nebraska legislature
will be sent to referendum. This
referendum business works both
ways. It can stop a good law put over
dy reiormers lust as easily as it can
stop a bad law smuggled through
pernicious lobbyists.
by
Looking BackWatd
This Dm? in Omaha J
i : v (
COMPILED FROM PEE. MLE3 1
000 C MAY O. ? OOP 1
Thirty Years Ago
Another fine business block Is promised
Omaha to be built by N, II. Falconer,
Joining on tho west of the building now
occupied by A. Crulckshank & Co., the
whole to be occupied by that enterprising
firm.
A passenger on the Incoming Union
Pacific train reports the belief In Salt
Lako that the Union Paclflo will soon
be running through trains to tho Mormon
capital over tho Utah Central.
The case of W, J. Connell against the
Pennsylvania railroad, was again tried In
Chicago with a verdict ot $16,000 for Mr.
Connell, being tho same amount re
turned at tho preceding trial last year.
The Swedish Lutheran society has de
cided to complete Us church odlflce at
Nineteenth and Cass streets by building1
tho steeple this soason.
The trustees of the Southwestern Pres
byterian church have purchased a lot ot
Ezra Millard near Twenty-first and
Leavenworth.
The cracker factory at Twelfth and
Jackson Is now In operation. The first
tot ot crackers produced wus shipped to
Butte, Mon., and the second lot to Pax
ton & Gallagher of this city.
J. O. Ambrose, formerly of Omaha, has
come over from Chicago to visit his
relatives.
John t. Rodlck Is back from Chicago.
James S. Boyd has gono cast.
Twenty Years Ago
Miss liattlo Ford of High View, ia.,
was the guest of her uncle, W. B. Wood,
1702 North Twenty-sixth street.
Mayor and Mrs, Joseph Obcrfolder ot
Sidney, the former one" of the prosperous
merchants of western Nebraska, were In
tho city.
City Knglneer Andrew Roscwater re
turned from Halt Lake City, whero he
went on business. Ho submitted a bid
to Install a new sewerage In that town,
but his bid was not low enough to land
tho work.
F. l. Loomls, manager of. the Aultman-
Taylor company, and C. A. Hunter, con
tracting freight agent for the Rock
Island, left for Chicago to take a peep
at the world's fair, then proceed to
Mansflold, O., to tako charge of the
largest and most valuable shipment of
threshing machines ever made to the
west. They expected to arrive in Omaha
with the train May 13.
As Mr. and Mrs. Gcorco Donhaur of
Thirty-fifth street and Patrick avenue
were crossing tho street tn their buggy
at Sixteenth and Webster, their vehicle
was struck by a Walnut Hill stroet car
and they were thrown out. The horse
started to run. Tho woman, flrBt to
regain herself, seized him by the bits
and held him safely tilt her husband got
on his feet. She fell back then and it
was discovered she had been badly hurt
on the back. He was not Injured.
Ten Years Ago
The employers or teamsters on strike
appealed to and procured from Judge
W. H. Munger of .the fedtral court In
junction restraining the strikers from
picketing.
John W. Alvord tt Chicago,- It .was an
nounced, was chosen' by the Omaha wa
ter board as Its appraiser to help deter
mine the valuo at which thd city was
to purchase the Omaha Water company
"Immediately" under tho Howell compus
sory purchase act.
The Union Paclflo officials were ser
iously considering tho matter of more
trackage facilities at Union station, as
the business was taxing the old facili
ties to tho utmost.
Dr, and Mrs. George I Miller were
guests of honor at a dinner party given
by Judge J, M. Wool worth and Mrs.
Howard, his sister, and others present
woro: General and Mrs. C. F. Mander
son, Captain and Mrs. William Mason
Wright and Mr. and Mrs. D. O. "ves.
Mr. and Mrs. C. T, Kountto, Mr. and
Mrs. A. C. Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Cle
ment Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Millard
and Mr. Samuel Rltter Brown were
guests of Mrs, Clementine Brown at an
evening dinner.
People Talked About
Wannetta Haverstlck, aged B, ot St.
Louis; la said to know ns much geography,
physics and politic aa the average high
school student.
Dr. Mary Walker claims to have been
one ot the "original Wilson men," and
wants a pension office Job aa a sign of
recognition.
The three automobile bandits recently
guillotined In Paris refused the customary
glass of liquor beforo the event They
preferred losing their heads In tho legal
way.
A Chicago family may play ragtime and
dance all night If they pay rent for the
flat. "Feelings of sleepless neighbors
cuts no Ice," according to a Chicago
Judge.
Mme, Lebaudy, the mother ot Jacques,
emperor of Sahara, who la probably the
richest woman In France, holds her wealth
In horror and lives the year around In a
small flat In Versailles under an assumed
name.
One hundred thousand people lifted the
lid at Coney Island last Sunday, wit
nessed scores ot winter bathers disport
ing In the Icy ocean, and cleaned out the
"hot dog" stands before the sun set
Officially the Ud comes off May IS.
After marrying his teacher, Miss Alice
DUnlop, In Fort Worth, ex., Edwin
Crowllng, aged It, Is on his way back
to Chataqua, Tex., with his bride. When
they arrive she will reopen her school
and he will again take his place aa her
pupil.
An annual pension of $1,600 has been
granted by the British government to
the widow ot Captain Robert L. Scott,
who perished In the South Anarctlc ice
field. A like sum has been granted
Jointly to the mother and two sisters
of the captain.
Mysterious Stephen Lund ot Warren,
N. II., at the age of 19 years has un
dergone the ordeal of his first haircut,
and rumor has It that this modern Sam
son sacrifices 130,000, which was left him
by the will of an uncle If he. reached
the age of xt without ever having his
locks sheared.
Jack Harris, a coal miner of PhllJIa,
la., and father ot twenty-three children,
witnessed the marriage recently ot his
daughter, Lora Harris, his thirteenth
child to enter upon matrimony. Miss
Harris became the bride at George Gil
llland, 23 years old, also of Phlldla. She
U 17.
Omaha's Municipal
OMAHA. May 5.-To the Editor ot The
Beei Don't you know that the municipal
credit Is bound up with the private credit
of a city's people? And that In Omaha
the ordinary basis for real cstato loans is
one-third of a close hard valuation, while
the bants of ordinary real estate loans In
cities of Omaha's class Is, and should be.
two-thirds of the value of the property?
I am not speaking of building and loan
associations on a monthly basis, and
which are limited In amount, but of loans
such as are adequate and ore needed
to build up and make modem clUes-loans
that como from the accumulated werslth
that Is to be found In tho money boxoi of
the world, and to which other cities of
Omaha's class have access on terms that
Omaha has not In Kansas City, Minne
apolis, Denver, Los Angeles, etc., the
market is well supplied with money at
two-thirds of a liberal valuation of the
property.
Now If you want to know how to build
up and strengthen Omaha's credit you
will need to go back a few years and
dig up what It was that did the damage
In the first pace, and In so doing you
will have to unearth things which will be
n surprise to many who ordinarily call
themselves well Informed, for what hur
Omaha might almost m well as far afc
the Information of tho general public Is
concerned have been done in tho coiner
behind tho back door. You all saw the
effects of what has been done, hut did
you what did It?
You nsk the average business man of
tho city, "What hurt Omaha after the
close of tho real estate boom of 15S3, '87
and 'S8?" and In ninety-nine cases out
of a hundred ho will reply, "The real
estate boom." But If those with good
memories who have kept In touch with
affairs will stop and think, they will re
call that In those boom days Omaha's
business as compared with that of Kansas
City, .ia shown by tho clearing house
reports, was only about 20 per cent behind
the latter, while the real estate boom In
Omaha compared as that of an Infant to
a robust young man to that of Kanas
City. In Kansas City lots wore platted
and sold every foot of tho way for ten
miles from the business center, Sixty-foot
front lots sold In Kansas City In the
center of blocks by the dozen at from
JK0.000 to 1175,000 each, while corners rold
Just as freely at 200,000 to 1225,000 each,
while In the height of Omaha's boom
tho southeast corner ot Sixteenth and
Farnam, CflxlK feet, was. bought by "Mr.
Thomas, whose family still owns It for
10,000, and J, H. Millard sold to the New
York Llfo Insurance company tho two
lots, 1S2X1S2 feet at the northeast corner
ot Seventeenth and Farnam streets tor
$126,000, or a basis of 150,000 for the Inside
lot and CO per cent added for the corner.
And then tho final top-notch sale was
the northwest corner of Sixteenth and
Farnam, 66x132 feet, to Dr. S. D, Mercer
for 192,000. These were the solo three top
notch sales of Omaha's real estate boom.
Now these being facts that aro sus
ceptible of proof, why was It that Omaha
suffered so much more than Kansas City
from tho effect of their concurrent
booms? Kansas City at the close of Its
boom went to work and promptly closed
out the wreckage, and It wns substan
.tlally cleared away In eighteen months,
With a decllno In real estato values there
not to exceed 25 per cent; for the people
of Kansas City were at all times able'
to borrow money to protect the value 'ot'
their property on the basis of the newly
adjusted scale. In other words, the peo
ple of Kansas City protected'Hhelr crodlt
and were at once able to go ahead and
do business, while Omaha than then did
only 20 per cent less business, and with"
a far less -boom than Kansas City which
Is at least as well located to du business,
and t belloVe better went through twenty
years of worse than hell. You all know
that real estato was freely offered with
no buyers to tako It at less than 20
Cents on the dollar of former value. I
recall walking up Sixteenth street from
Nicholas to Farnam In the fall ot 1892.
and three-fourths of tho stores were va
cant, for tho people here had no money
to spend in them. Do you wonder that
your savings banks that did a conserva
tive real estate loan business, were
wrecked and unablo to pay 50 per cent?
I am not speaking of concerns that dealt
In second mortgage loans, but of con
cerns that In older cities would have
gono on In safety.
Now, why was this? What was done
that made this state of affairs? A set
of men tn important responsible .posi
tions who were elected as democrats or
republicans, It matters not, but who werq
In fact populists said: "We will not al
low the money sharks to rob the people
of their property," and to effect that
they made a set of rules to govern the
courts In the forcclosuro of mortgages,
In which rules, If there wero no particu
lar litigation, and no appeal to the su
preme court. It took from five to seven
years to get title under foreclosure of
mortgage, and It taken to the supreme
court with litigation double that time was
Editorial Viewpoint
Philadelphia Ledger: If a man la afraid
to say It himself, he nearly always asks
a newspaper to do It for him,
Washington Post; The colored office
holder about to be pried oft tho govern
ment Job he hat held in South Carolina
since the fall ot Fort Sumter is begin
ning to look upon tho civil war aa a
failure.
Chicago News: Ex-Senator Bourne of
Oregon wants $3,000,000,000 expended on
good roads. Here (a a chance for Messrs.
Rockefeller and Carnegie to pool their
foundations and do something popular,
Pittsburgh Dispatch: While the heirs
quarreled a Now York estate- grew from
$900,000 to over $5,000,000. Of course, It
sounds like a fairy story, but If thero
wero not an occasional exception the rule
would never be proven. In this caso the
estato was In the hands of the coutt
Baltimore, American: During 1913 this
country Imported gems worth $41,562,720,
and these were sold for many millions
more than the customs valuation. Thus
our people are spending over a million
dollars a week for precious stones. All
the extra money Is not going into auto
mobiles. St. Louis Republic: Our exports havo
averaged $7,000,000 a day for the first nine
months of the current fiscal year, and
manufactured goods comprised 00 per
cent ot such exports. Secretary or Com
merce Redtleld thinks that this shows
that our manufacturers are competing
pretty successfully with manufacturer
abroad. Everybody Is entitled to a guess.
What's yours?
Dolns Quite Well.
IndinnapiUs News.
Notwithstanding all Its other troubles
the steel trust continue to declare its
usual quarterly dividends and stow away
, snug sum for a rainy day
CreditAn Answer
taken, during which time no receiver
could be appointed to take care ot In
come and protect the property. The par
ties who borrowed the money received
the Income, made no payment ot taxes,
for until the scavenger law was passed
payment of taxes could not be enforced,
and as a rule no repairs wero mado.
While the lender of the money received
no interest he had to provide money for
taxes or to pay them with the added pen
alties when he got title.
Of course, no one could, or would, lend
a dollar here under such conditions, credit
was completely destroyed. Tho people
of Omaha could not obtain money to pro
tect the value of their property, and be
cause ot that, It depreciated to less than
20 per cent of its vnluc. The money
lenders were hurt, but the people of
Omaha were ground under the mill
stones. This destroying of a credit of a
people caused those who only owned 20
per cent ot the value of their homes to
lose them. This destruction of credit
caused the foreclosure of thousands of
pieces of property and passing ot title
to creditors, and those new owners, under
tho conditions then created, failed to re
ceive (largely because of those condi
tions) adequate Incomes from the property
taken over, and all over tho land thoso
new owners were soro spots that hurt
Omaha's credit Since that time there
has been an Improvement In the time and
manner of forclosures, but still they aro
not as they should be.
Elsewhere when complaint is filed, de
fendant must answer In ten days or show
every substantial cause why he should
ba granted as much more time, while
here that thing Is lax and ninety days
usually expires beforo Issue Is made up
and case Is on the docket tor trial. Up
to within a year past usually eighteen
months elapsed before a caso was heard
In court and judgment determined. Than
timo Is given for motion for now trial,
time for appeal, which uses up, say
seventy days. The- execution Issued. A
stdto law gives, without rhymo or rea
son, nine months stay of execution, and
at tho end of Btay, advertising takes
thirty days at least then an Indefinite
tlmo may elapse for tho court to decide
to confirm sale, or order a new adver
tisement and sale.
To make the mass ot your people pros
perous, you must Improve the credit of
that mass, and sp make It possible tor
them to get adequate amounts of money
on liberal terms at lowest rates of in
terest To do that, you must make It
certain that the lender will receive hla
monoy and Interest promptly when due.
When that is done there will always be
an ample supply of money offering to pro
tect the borrower, and they can go ahead
with confidence to help themselves, and
what each does for himself helps boost
the whole. In other cities Of Omaha's
class tho trust is used, and its use helps
the credit of the people no one has to
use it unless he sees fit, but your people
should have that resource at their com
mand.. New, the municipal credit of a city
cannot be above that ot tho general level
of the moss ot its people. Omaha has
many able, wealthy citizens ot high credit
and they help to raise the credit of the
general mass. But you must bo tlx It
that thore be no blur or ctoud UDon the
credit ot the general mass of a people If
you expect them to bo prosperous with
good crodlt .
Do you suppose that Los Angeles would
have grown in eighteen "years from aa
Inert town of 70,000 to the livest city of
the land, with 400,000 people, a city of
magnificent buildings, a city able to
borrw $2,0000,000 to build a water system
In a dry land. If care had not been taken
to protect the people who loanod tho
money to mako the city? No such tight
S3 per cent loah market with uncertainty
as to when or how tho lender of that
money, would bo paid, would have pro
duced the money to have made that city,
nor will it do it elsewhere. Los Angeles
needed the help of the trust deed, and
used It freely; so does Denver, Kansas
City, etc
If you Intend to build a live city here,
Its people must wako up and tear down
the barriers that the populists ot the dead
past have built about us which keeps
prosperity away. No man who builds bar
riers between himself and his creditors
can expect to have good crodlt No man,
or set ot men, or city, have a right to ex
peat that You mUBt make and enforce
your laws so as to clean the skirts of all
If yoU would have gilt-edged credit as a
people. If the leading men ot Omaha will
bear a hand, and take hold of this matter,
you will not after three years havo
occasion to writs such ah editorial.
There are other things that have somo
bearing upon the municipal credit, of a
city. But If this one great underlying
thing Is made right the others will bo
trivial by comparison. IL
Political IJew Brooms
Years of ridicule failed to remove horse
cars from New York's byways, An act
ot the legislature Is about to do it
If an Illinois senator gets his olll
through the legislature, advertising sure
cure patent medicines will coll for a
penalty for $100 for each offense.
In return for authority to limit 5-cent
phone connections to five minutes the
Chicago Telephone company has agreed
to a reduction of rates approximating
$60,000 annually, ordered by a committee
of the city council.
Congressman Delzell of Pennsylvania
announce his retirement from public Ufa
at the end of his term. Mr. Delzell Is one
Of the old guard who survived the
slaughter of last November and life la
awful lonely In the minority side.
Governor Sulxer of New York had one
of his periodical spells last week and
said things In his usual CheeterfleMlon
style. "1 know the power that Is behind
my office," ho exclaimed. "All that power
and agencies will be used to crush -he
men who would make the dtmocratlo
party a hypocrite .and a political liar."
A labor bill In the Pennsylvania legis
lature prohibits railroad companies from
employing as train operatives any person
who has had less than eighteen months'
experience and who has not been In ac
tive service at least three months pre
ceding his appointment. The object of
the proposed law Is to put "strikebreak
ers" out of business.
BulirJnsr ttt Hope.
Boston Transcript
Senator Smoot bulges out with a new
scheme to reduce the cost of Uvlng which
would require an appropriation ot inlr
$500,000 a year, but It he wants to get ui
Interested In It he will have to put it on
tha free list
State Newspapers
Humphrey Democrat- What would you
think of a woman and thoy nay there is
on in Humphrey who will "stand off"
tho washerwoman and use the money
that might have gone to her In the purchase-
of a new hat? But wo must have
hats.
Plattsmouth Journal; After a newspaper
controversy the school board at Wahoo
has decided to have the mtnutcs of eaah
meeting pub .ehtd in the local papers and
paid for by the district. And why not?
Taxes for school purposes nro now the
heaviest that taxpayers bear, and the
public Is entitled to information showing
how the money Is spent, not only In tho
larger towns, but In all school districts.
Albion News: H. G. Taylor has
things coming his way. He was elected
railroad commissioner and now has got
married. Whether thero was any con
nection between the two events we know
not lie seems quite fearless as to the
responsibility he assumes, however, and
his many Nebraska friends will continue
to believe he will make good under any
and all conditions.
Kearney Hub: The Omaha Boo remarks
that congressmen who fought reciprocity
because it took the tariff off of farm
products ns, between tho United States
and Canada, ran not consistently do any
thing but fight a democratic tariff bill
that would expose farm products to un
restricted foreign competition, not only
with Canada, but with all tho other coun
tries as well. Quito right!
Central City Republican: Merrick coun
ty may well be proud that her repre
sentative at Lincoln opposed "the $20,000
appropriation for the erection of an
armory at Nebraska City. Barring the
fact that the structure will mako an ex
cellent dance hall, wo cannot for Hie life
of us ascertain In what respect the state
of Nebraska will benefit by this invest
ment Tho movement afoot to make this
law run tho gauntlet ot the referendum
Is highly commendable.
T
You CaivStop
Those Heaclaciies
MOST headaches are oongesttva Headaches. A, dJsor
dereA. stomach, slagglslx circulation, lnaotlvs bowels,
dietary indiscretion, Biliousness, all prodnoo congestion,
sad -the headache la tha signal of distress. Every ohs
and pain in the human body la nature's cry that something'
Is wrong. Tend to It at onoo. A dslay cannot Improve It,
IT your system in congested, remove tho poisonous ma
terial which causes It and your headache disappears. Tha
remedy which moves your bowels quickly within on hour
or so and clears tho system Is UUJHYADX 7AXT0B WATER,
tho natural Xaxatlve. , glass taken in the morning' or'ad
any tlmo on an empty stomach acts within one hour,
gently and snrely. Why not stop such headaches? Get
bottle at any Dratf Store to-day.
Your printed matter ia absolutely without
valuo if it is not read.
If it ia woll illustrated, you will be suro people
will read It. Furthermore, a picture often tells tho
story at a single glance.
If you have your outs and illustrations
mado ka newspaper engraving plant, you
may be oortain that they will print well.
The requirements of making cuts for news
paper illustration are so severe that it re
quires the very best ability and machinery.
Our artlBta, our plant, consisting of the finest,
newest and latest equipment, and our skilled work
men are at your command at the very lowost rates
for all kinds of art and engraving work.
Dee Lttoravm
DEE BVJLD.I.N
Protect
Yourself
Aek for
ORIGINAL
GENUINE
He Food Drink for
DR. BRADBURY DEMTIST
idus i-arnam bu
Extracting ...... 25c Up
Pilling Boo Up
Uridgework . , C2.H0 I u
Crmvns ...... S2.B0 I p
Plates ....j... 92.001'p
JOLLIES FItOM JUDfJE.
"You look sleepy, Jonrs. You mus.
have been up with the sun this morn
ingf "Yes; I was Up with him all night."
Musician I hear you told Mrs. Bakel
that I loved my kind.
Barker No, I didn't. I said you like,
human beings.
Wllklns Have you heard HavelefehV
mesnalllance?
Blllklna-No, I haven'tr but I don't
think it can come up to an America
made car.
"Say. pop, what do they mean by at
author's 'posthumous' works?"
"Usually the indiscretions ot his youth,
which his literary executors dig up, In
stead of allowing them to be decently
burled with him." ,
Maude Congratulate me, Gladys
Harry has given me the keeping of n:
heart.
Gladys I'd advise you to handle It
carefully nnd look well after the cement.
Last month he told mo I had broken It.
Maid Thieves got Into a house In thU
street last' night and nto!e all the silver
Mistress What stupid people to leavi
things unlocked! Whose house was It?
Maid It was number seven.
Mistress Why, that's our house'
Maid Yes, mu'nm, but I did not want
to frighten you.
"Son, why don't you play circus? It'
great fun. First, yot. make aisawdusl
ring."
"Where'll 1 get any sawdust, dad?"
"Hero's the saw. Just saw somo 0!
that cordwood Into siove lengths. You
can havo all tho sawdust yon make.'
Mrs. Hemmandhaw I am almost heart
broken because Ethel wants to become
a moving picture actress. What shall
I do?
Mrs. Slmmerpato If sho wero ,nv
daughter, I'd Just let her flicker.
Sister Klttle's home from collego with
a host of modern kinks
In tho way of hygienics, sanitation,
food and drinks.
Protelds and carbohydrates she comblnet
oxactly right
For the strictly balanced ration sh
Identifies at sight
Sho knows all about digestion, what It
best for us to eat.
What wo need for body-butldlng, gtowth
and force, repair and heat:
And the dinner table's lovely when my
sister nas 11 set;
But we haven't lost our confidence tn
Mother's cooking yet.
arimeui
O
OMAHA
all AgesOthers are Imitations
Phone Dons;. 1730
aliasing Teem supplier
without Plate or llrldco
wirk. Nerves removed
without pain. Work jiuw
autced ten yara

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