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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, March 27, 1914, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99021999/1914-03-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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Strange? -Yes,
,
fW, MUTT THrVr&) " -v
APecuUrtRTHINftll
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i
YANI6ANS MARKUP VICTORY
Seonre Revenge Over Regular in
Close Score of Five to Four.
GAME FILLED WITH ERRORS
Victor Make Mas lllls,Init TnUe
AdTRiitBKe of Moch Jtlnffllnir
and Ilrlnic In Mom
Knne.
Despite the chilling wind which blew
diagonally across the diamond and thua
making It decidedly uncomroftabe (or the
tolling athlete, and regardless of the
fact that they were without the services
of their leader, D. Schlpke, the yanlgans
aecured a wholesome revenge over the
regulars Thursday afternoon by trouncing
those gents with a score of 5 to 4. The
yans only nailed two hits to the regulars'
five, but they (lolded admlfably and took
advantage of the bases on balls and bum
heaves of their opponents.
Stevenson and Alexander opened tho
fray, as they did Tuesday. The yans got
a one-run lead In that Inning per one
base on balls presented to Eddie Wallace.
Wallace was first up and he worked
Alexander for a pass. Then- Alexander
muffed up an attempted sacrifice by
Payne and both Wallace and Payne
perched safely on the path to the home
Plate. Graham's sacrifice moved both up
one; notch and Wallace romped home
when Shestak bobbled.
Tito Scores In Sixth.
The regulars copped two scores In the
sixth, but the yans came right baok. and
evened matters Up with another marker.
Thomas opened the slvth and got .a base
on, balls.- lie swiped secopdand went
to third i on a fielder's, choice from the
bat of Hicks, who ma first, as the play
was directed toward Thomas. Hick's
promptly made a dive for second ' base
and as he did so 'Thomas hiked for the
plate, ailing home Just ahead of the pill.
Hal Chase then tore one off for a slnglo
and Hicks came home for tho second
tally.
Payne opened for the yans In the asm
Inning with a single. Hi was sacrificed
to second by Graham and he came home
on an error by Joe Ward, who couldn't
smother a slow roller from Bell.
Tie In Seventh.
With the score a tie In the seventh Con
galton managed to talk the umpire Into
giving him a base on balls. Krug sacri
ficed him to second, andConny pilfered
third when the yans were looking at a
flock of geese. He came home on Ward's
sacrifice fly to Dell. Dut the yans evened
inciters up by a little fluke play in on
the' paVt of the regulars. Smith walked,
stole second, went to third on a fielder's
choice and swiped the plate when Shestak
dropped tho ball
In tho nlntti the regulara made another
tally, but the yans returned wtjh a. chip
on their shoulders and nailed the contest
with two more runs. Chase singled to
center, stole the second hassock, went to
third on an Infield hit by Thomason and
made the pay station on a single to cen
' ter by Congalton.
The last of the ninth was a circus.
Mr. Madden, a Crelghton lad, who was
fired from school, went Into the box to
accept the job ot Mr, E. Closman, who
hiked for the club house as soon as he
had pitched his three Innings. Madden
Immediately made Mr. It- Smith a present
of a base on balls. Then Madden got
mixed up with his feet and threw, the
ball over first trying to capture Shannon,
who had bunted. The yans then threw
the ball around the yard a bit, and when
Rogers bunted one they threw it around
some more.' In the meantime flmlth and
Shannon rambled home, Shannon carrying
the winning count. Then the game broke
up with the yanlgans triumphant
The lineup: .
nEOULAns.
AB.
...,
...
... 4
... 3
... 3
tee m
... 2
... 3
... 1
... t
... 1
... 0
It.
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
Q
0
I.
0
0
H.
0
2
1
1
0
1
0
. 0
0
0
0
o
O.
10
10
0
0
0
I
1
I
0
0
0
0
E.
0
Clancy. :b
Chase, lb
Thomason, Of....
Congalton, rf....
Krug. If ...
Ward. Jb
Thomas, ss.......
Shestak. c
Alexander, P
Hicks, p
12, tlosman, p...
Madden, p
1
1
0
0
I
1
0
1
0
0
I
Totals...... 4
YANIQAN8.
AB. R.
Wallace, ss 3 1
6 21 19
H.
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
O.
II
0
0
0-
Payne, lb., 3 1'
Graham
2bV
0
Bell, rf
Meeker, of....,
Smith. 1b ,
Shannon, If... ,...,
Hogers, e -.a.
3 0
3 0
,2 '
3n r J
s; .&!
I. o
Ktevenion. V-j.,
i.rauv, p,
Y.
1 0
A
Closman, pi. ' 1 0 :
Totals 23 1 i
27 It 3
110 S-S
Yanlgans
Kegulara
..1 0 0 0 0
.0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1-4
Stolen bates: Thomas (2). Hloks, Chase,
Congalton, Smith (2). Sacrifice hits:
Krug, Orahum (J), Meeker. Sacrifice fly:
ward Hits: Off Alexander. I In three
Innings; off Hicks, none in two Innings;
.J1? Oosman, in three Innings: off
Madden, none, in ohe-thlrd Inning; off
Stevenson. 1 la three Innings; off Brady
1 in thre innings: off A. Closman, 3 In
three Innings. Struck out: Dy K. Ctos.
man 1. by Brady. 2. Bsscs on balls: Off
iinuiwr, . on hicks, l. otf K. Clos
rnarvl. of t Madden. 1, off Brady. 1. ofi
A ttosraaA. t Passed ball .Bhestak
off
Shestak.
Itogers. Time of ram
Pendleton.
umpire
Indeed, Very
fNO oHfc '
fOR-lY Ai A
MictiAOKee
PSP5R.
Mollwitz Has Offer
from Brooklyn Feds
CHICAGO, March Rf.-Ktfd Moltwlts,
the promising young first base candidate
with the Chicago' Nationals, has received
an offer from the Brooklyn Federals.
which, he said, he would accept unless the !
Chicago club Increases his salary. This
news reached Chicago today from Louis
ville, where the Cubs play this afternoon.
Mollwlti'a offer was made by Mike Mai
loy, the Federal league scout, who, as
Cub scout last year, recommended the
young player, then In the Wisconsin
Illinois league, to President Murphy. The
Brooklyn club promised to pay him $3,800
a year, with a three-year contract, wli'llo
his present cpntract. in compliance with
regulations of organized ball, provides for
a salary of only $1,200 until he is accepted
as a "regular."
Shortstop Weaver and Pitcher Scott of
the Chicago Americans, who said they re
ceived ..Federal league offers, have been
ordered to Join the section of the team
traveling Under the direct supervision of
Manager Callahan.
OAKI.ANp, Cal., March .-Following
newatbat two ot hla stars were Irt com
munication with the Federals, Manager
.lamsjVCallnhun of the Chicago Amer
icans ordered riteher James Scott, Short
stop Wtaifer ftnd5Catcher Daly to report
to hlm' and the three players left hero
last nlgnl for Los Angeles. In their
places'. Pitchers Faber and Latlirop and
Second Baseman ne rger came to Oakland,
Ted Qleason' also arrived, from the south
to assume command of the second squad,
preparatory to the trip home) which
starts next Sunday,
Negley and Van Nes
Wm Two-Men Prize
BUFFALO, U. Y., - March W.-Negley
and Van Ness of Newark, N. J., were to
day declared winner of the two-man
event of the American i Bowling congresi
tournament. Their scoro was l.Stt and
their prize $300.
A possible new leader In all events de
veloped this morning In Italph Morgan
ot Buffalo, who now has, a total score ot
1,29$ for six games. He needs 603 In his
tingles tonight to pass the high score,
1,877, held by William Miller of Detroit.
CHICAGO FANS WIRE FOR
SEATS FOR WRESTLING BOUT
Nate Lewis, Chicago boxing promoter
and formerly manager for several top
notch fighters, has wired from Chicago
to Manager Charlie Franks of the Krug
theater asking that twelve ringside seats
to the big championship match between
Stantslaw Zbyssko and Touslff Hussane
Saturday night at the Krug be reserved
for himself and party of Chlcagoans.
Several other delegations of sportsmen
from Chicago, Kansas, City, Lincoln and
other cities are expected to be here for
the big match.
Zbyssko, accompanied by his manager,
Jack Herrman, arrived In Omaha at
noon from Chicago, He will train at the
Owl club until the night of the big
match. Zbyssko realises ha Is to meet a
tartar In Hussane, but Is confident of
victory.
For preliminaries to the big match
Charlie Loch will meet Joe Hill. Hilt
has an edge on the weight, but the
Omaha boy figures on his speed to over
tame the handicap. Charlie Peters,' a
heavyweight from Papltllon, Vetn Dreed-
love, a featherweight, from Council Bluffs
and perhaps Owon Pally, the lightweight
champion of Nebraska will constitute the
other preliminaries.
CREIGHT0N TEAMS PLAY
FIRST BALL OF SEASON
Crelghton students took "part In their
first base ball game ot the season
Wednesday afternoon ' pn' Crelghton
campus, when the pharmacy department
walloped .the freshmen medics to the tune
of 10 to 6,.
Pitts, varsity tackle on the foot ball
team, pitched for the freshmen and was
In mld'seasun form.' but bis" trammates
piled up a large collection of errors and
could not hit the sphere.
Madden and Morey Miller composed tho
battery for the pharmacist.
BUFFALO COMEsTrOM
BEHIND BEATS PITTSBURGH
DANVILLE, Va., March M.-The But-
fa'lo I'rdeJttl League club came from be-
Tilhd In the seventh and last inning of
the gsme today with the Pittsburgh club
ot the same league and scored three runs
and won. 6 to 4. Score: B.H.IS.
Pittsburgh I i 3
Buffalo S 1
Batteries. Lectalre, Knetaor. D. Hob
erts and Roberts. Berry: Moore, Houscr,
uciilllier ana itisir snq Alien.
PHILLIES CRUSH RALEIGH
BY ELEVEN TO TWO SCORE
RALT310H, N. Y.. March 24. The Phila
delphia Nationals easily took today'a
game here, defeating the local club of the
Carolina league. It to 2, Score R.H K.
Philadelphia ... . It II 0
nalelgh 214
Batteries. Philadelphia, Mayer, Tlncup,
r inner ana iiurni. nairign, Yolim, He
langer, droves and IUley, Perkins.
Strange
I 61 I
r
CENTRAL SCHEDULE IS MADE
Association Decides to Play .Hun
dred and Thirty Games.
SEASON WILL OPEN MAY SIX
Waterloo Oiit-ns nt Keoknk, Mir
nhnlltnnn nt tlurllnicton, Crilar
Itaplda nt Muscatine, Clin
ton nt Otluinrrn.
KEOKUK, la., March . The Central
association, whoso playing ichedule was
announced today, will have a campaign
of 130 games. This moans sixty-five
games at home and sixty-five on trio road,
for each team, but some teams will ap
pear oftener in some towns than others,
Burlington, for Instance, playing ten
games at Waterloo, while Marsholltown
plays only nine there.
The season opens on May 6, with Water
loo at Keokuk, Marshalltown at Burling
ton, Cedar Baplda at Muscatine, and Clin
ton at Ottumwa. Memorial day Ottumwa
plays a double-header at Waterloo, Mus
ratlne at Marshalltown, Burlington at
Cedar Rapids, Keokuk at Clinton. July 4
.finds Waterloo at Muscatine, Marshall
town at Ottumwa, Cedar Baplda at Bur
lington and Clinton at Keokuk.
The campaign ends with double-headers
on September 7 (Labor Day), with Bur
llngton at Waterloo, Keokuk at Marshall
town, Muscatine at Cedar Itaplds and
Ottumwa at Clinton.
St. Louis Americans
Held to Tie Score
!
NABHVILLB,- Tenn., March 2G.-The
Nashville Southern, league team today
played the St, Louis American first team
in a D in H lie. 'inn irame waa canca at
the end ot the ninth inning because of
darkness. Witte, who pitched eight In
nings for St. Louis, gave seven bases on
balls. Score: R.H.B.
Nashvill , 10 3
St. Louis 6 12 3
Uatterles: Nashville, Rogers, Stevens
and Smith: St. Louis, Wltte, James and
Clemens, Agnew,
Maok Regulars Lose
to Baltimore Team
W1LMINQTON, N. C, March 26.-The
Baltimore Internationals defeated the
Philadelphia American league regular
team today, t to 2. Frank Baker had
four hits in fve times at bat, one a two
base hit. Two errors by Collins con
tributed to Baltimore's score. Score:
n.it.R.
Baltimore 9 2
l'hllaaelnlila , ,...213 i
Batteries: Baltimore, rtuth and Kgan:
Philadelphia, Brown, Pennock and
Bchang, Lapp.
With the Bowlers
Sunderland llros.' I.eauiie,
in: run no bones.
lit. 2d.
3d.
Total.
269
412
4C3
39
275
Smyth 13S rx
143
too
US
iis
Mullls 131 14
Ogdan 183 134
Straw ,, 99
Klein 137
Totals
511 K0
YULLO WAOONS.
1st.
2d.
Jd. Tjotal.
Strother ,.
,.1M
..US
,. m
..no
m
103
114
let
179
m
m
463
parxer
137
ISO
167
Ml rot
Kastman
Totals m 577 641 1.S11
CEIIT1KI1CD KOALS,
lit. 2d.
3d. Total.
Sheets' ,..13) 121
Wallenberg 130 123
104
411
422
394
321
3S1
169
m
105
lil
L.unaucrg lis 119
Ciwln 10ft ion
nennett lis. 133
Totals 600 603 73S l,tl
HANSUM BIUX
1st. 3d. 3d. Total.
Bock 160 113 147 445
Durran 163 1M 133 3tt
Anderson 142 106 W m
Laxerstrom 113 11& 116 .143
Williams 91 34 112 2$7
Totals Tl9 W0 "filo l.ftU
Coinmerclul Leaicur,
ItUMOHlt'S OLD TAVKllNS
1st. 2d.
2d. Total.
Stanley 1U 142
Vote in 3U
Monroe ..,,,156 1ST
Shaw .,..142 131
McDonald 166 1U
1B9
176
1M
167
7
433
370
&2J
440
Totals m SSI W 3.478
TRACY'S LA TRUIM8.
1st.
2d.
3d. Totat.
Doherty 172
IV)
!u
170
187
161
170
169
170
SO!
179
331
Dahmke 131
111
310
m
(05
Straw , 170
Miller 150
J. Howley ....175
Total 7V8 308 390 2.436
JETTKR'B OLD AOE.
1st.
2d.
3d. Total.
Straw
Stand
Oil ..
Zlm .
Zarp
170
300
, 161
134
151
170
190
in
17
1S4
170
172
SI0
Kl
160
234
192
618
III
Total tM SSS 70 2,714
hbsblin's thadb marks.
1st. 2d. 3d. Total.
Chandler 172 208 233 613
liengele 170 167 176 612
Beselln 143 182 184 314
Lytle 133 181 234 K3
Heaton 140 182 224 W
Totals
.763 930 1.0M 2,733
Key to the Situation-Bee Advertising.
Took n to Hep-.
fM frit.rott-r,Hif
Indianapolis Bowler
Takes Second Place
BUFFALO, N. V., March 26.-J. P. Mc
Cullough ot Indianapolis took second
place In the Individuals event ot the
American Bowling congress tournament
today with a score of C63. twelve pins
behind tho high score held by William
Miller of Detroit. A team of Buffalo
bowlors, Peter and George. Ilodems, rolled
high In the doubles today, with a score
of 1,242. tlelng Sohenkel and Smith, ot
Pittsburgh for second place
BREAD ONlMRS RETURNS
Joe Ohoynski Remembered in Will
of Chink He Befriended.
EX-PUa QET8 PART OF FORTUNE
Former I'rlsn flight rr Sent Hone
ot Jim Pon to School, Knrn
lnr ' (irnllturie of
rathrr.
CHICAGO, March 28. Joo Choynskl,
former prlio fighter, and now director
of a Pittsburgh sporting -club has been
left a legacy of $10,000 In tho will ot Jim
Pon, a Chinese, whom tho boxer be
friended years ago. Jim Pon died a few
flaya Ago and his sons, Ned Ylns and
Bert Ylng, unable to open the safe in
their father's Twenty-second street res
taurant, "The Oarden ot the Seven
Lilies," wired to their old friend,
ChOynskt. Tho boxer reached Chicago
today, and with him brought a safe ex-I-ert.
In a few minutes the big steel
doors swung open-and on top of a. pile
ot papers was found Pon's will. It named
Choynski aa exoutor and guardian of
Jim Pon's sons and awarded him a sub
stantial part of a good sized fortune
Choynskl'a ' first act ot kindness to
ward Pon was In sending his boys to
school. Lnter when Jim Pon becamo
wealthy, he sent Ned Ylng to China,
where the boy married. When Ned re
turned to America, leaving his wife and
their llttlo child in China, he was halted
by the Immigration officials at Seattle,
but Choynskt again came to his old. Ho
explained Ned Ylng's American birth, and
nad him re-admitted.
Choynski has arranged to have Jim
Pon's little grandson Join his father here
and also arranged. In accordance with
Jim Pon's will, to have both Ned Ylng's
wife and mother taken care ot in China.
Cleveland Association
Team Trims 'Braves
MACON. Go.. March S6.-The Cleveland
American Association team again de
feated the Boston Nationals today, 3 to 2,
giving Cleveland three of the four games
played. Score; R.H.K.
Cleveland , 3 7 0
Iioston 2 3 2
Batteries: Clevelnnd. Krost. Doslinnr
and Devogt, Causbyj Rudolph, Perdue
ami uoway,
SIOUX CITY COUNTRY CLUB
GETS TWO MEN FROM OMAHA
ii ii i
Another of Omaha's professionals has
been acquired by Sioux -City country
club. The Sioux City Country club has
employed John Canavan of the Happy
iioiiow ciuu m Become me professional
there. A new nine-hole golf course Is to
be added to the Sioux City club's present
court and tho work will be supervised by
Canavan upon his arrival. Mike Shear
man of the Field club Is the other Omaha
golfer to go to Sioux City. Ho will en
ter the services of the Sioux City Boat
club. CanavAn reports to Sioux City Sat
urday, while Shearman reports April 1.
HINDU, EX-MEMBER OF
STANFORD FACULTY, HELD
SAN FRANCISCO. March 26.-Har
Dyal, former lecturer pn Hindu philos
ophy, at Leland Stanford, Jr. university,
was arrested here tonight by the Immi
gration authorities charged with being
lllogatly a resident of the United States.
He is held for deportation. It was
tatd on high authority tonight that
Dyal's deportation Is desired by tho
British government. While In this coun
try he has advocated sedition In India,
and reports received here within a day
or so were that an Indian malcontent was
arrested with papers from Dya urging
rummary action.
BEACHEY AND FOWLER TO
ENTER WORLD AIR RACE
NEW YORK. March 26. Two American
aviators, Lincoln Beachey and "Bob"
Fowler, have announced their Intention
of entering the round-the-world race to
start from the Panama-Pacific exposition
grounds In San Francisco next year. It
was stated here tonight by Arnold
K ruck man, manager of the contest Be
sides the two Americana the manufac
turers of three leading types of aero
planes In Europe have Informed
krnrkman that they will enter aviators
and machines.
A NO IT UMWt'V) f .
HttP- DOC r-' ' jP ' ' ' " 1 ' '
L r '
BURDEN HEAYYFOR SENATOR
0. M. Hitchcock Tells of Labors of
Legislator in Washington.
LAWYERS ARE THE LISTENERS
Details Some of the Mnny Dnlles
nf it Han Who Has to Look
After the Wrtnts and Needs
of Constituents.
Oreat burdens borne by legislators at
Washington formed tho substanco of Sen
ator Hitchcock's address to the Omaha
liar association at the University club
last night, when ho reviewed all tho im
portant bills before congress and uttered
a protest against tho tendency to con
centrate In the central government
powers which should properly be vested
In tho states.
At the conclusion of the address Presi
dent Blackburn ot the association said:
"It strikes mo that the senator has
been emphasizing two things: First, he
has encouraged candidates for the house,
and, second, he has discouraged possible
candidates for the senate."
Suffrage, the Mexican question, national
prohibition, trust legislation, tho Monroo
doctrine, canal tolls, rural credits, na
tional grain Inspection, pensions, good
roads, the Philippine policy and the pres
ident's unparalleled power we'ro som6 of
the subjects touched lightly In passing
by the senator, after he had complimented
the Omaha bar as a "choice clsss" of
"high-ranking" lawyers, ot which ho was
one.
Meddllnst irllh Things.
Throughout the senator's speech stress
was laid upon tho fact that the national
government is being' compelled by stross
ot clrcumstanpe to .meddle with a. Jot ,'of
legislation that does not rightfully be
long to It, This, he sold. Is largely due
to the fact that states do not choose their
legislators with proper care.
However, out of all the darkness ot In
creasing legislation tho senator said he
saw a light tho gradual awakening of
congress to the necessity of dealing with
the nation from tho "human- Interest"
standpoint and a finer discrimination in
favor of the masses as pitted against
Property rights
"Suffroge," said the senator, "has be
como a very acute problem at Washing
ton, In spite of tho fact that states can
deal with the question and that it is by
no means necessary for the federal gov
ernment to take a stand. Still." he said,
"It Is ,a wonderfully vital question to
those senators from states where women
have the ballot"
As to Mexico, Bemttor Hitchcock said
that, as In most cases, the people prob
ably did not appreciate the mighty ef
forts put forth to solve the riddle. He
doubted the wisdom of Interference, say
ing It would redound to the everlasting
credit of tho president if the question was
finally settled without intervention.
Referring to the question of Panama
canal tolls, Senator Hitchcock said free
passage would really mean subsidy, which
he had always opposed. He believed the
canal would bo operated nt about a 310.-
000,000 annual loss.
Prohibition, he said, wn a serious thing
at Washington and It was probable the
question would becomo more acuto. Ho
emphasized the fact that It a constitu
tional amendment were submitted to the
states It would hang fire for fifty yearn,
aa a state voting against It could at any
time change about and vote for it, but
nn affirmative vote pledged the atate for
Bretton
A most attractive White Satin
Striped Madras model which is
being extensively worn by the
most particular dressers in the
great style centres.
Ide Silver
Collars
2 for 25c
ere easy to put on and take off. They're
beautifully made and beautifully finished and known
the country over for their great wearing qualities.
For Sale by the Following Firms
PRAY
60U-10 Ho. letli
Drawn for The Bee by
all time. He wanted to know Just what
would happen, especially In the large
cities, If tho country went dry, and that
It might go dry ho admitted, because of
"tho growing sentiment In the south and
in several states for prohibition."
In conclusion tho senator drew a word
picture of tho power being centralized
in the federal government and asked the
lawyers to consider what a mighty force
would emanate from Washington when,
In sixty years, tho United States reaches
Its Influence over 200,000,000 people "with
each congress giving the president more
power, although he now has a greater
power than any potentate on earth."
Costs of Hobson's
Race Mounting High
WASHINGTON, March 26.-Flrst re
ports of a campaign expenso In senatorial
primaries under the now direct elections
ameudmont were made public by tho sen
ate today.
Rcpresentativo Hobson of Alabama sent
In a detailed account of expenditures ag
gregating 35,367,34, of which $2,171 was
spent In traveling and 32,613.19 In news
paper and other advertising. Contribu
tions to his fund amounted to 31,825, ot
which 3600 came from the National
Woman's Temperance unlun. Represent
ative Underwood, Mr. Hdbion's opponent,
has not mado his report
From South Dakota, Senator Crawford,
who was defeatod yesterdny by Repre
sentative Burke, reported spending $2,055,
while Representative Burke's list totalled
$3,328.80. Senator Clark ot Arkansas re
ported $360.30 and his opponent, William
F. Klrby, $1,631,50.
Senator Shlyeley ot Indiana reported he
had spent nothing.
Water Board Will
Buy a. New Pump
At a meeting of the Water board yes
terday afternoon, the members thereof
felicitated themselves because, their
treasurer said, the water district was
earning nomothlng like $12 a day over ex
penses on Its securities, which have boon
gradually Invested by Treasurer W. Q.
Uro in warrants and other things.
The board authorized the purchase of
a pump for $27,760, which was Inspected
by It. B. Howell and C. R. Sherman on
a trip they made cast especially for- this
purpose. The pump manufacturers threw
In a meter which the board accepted as
a concession.
CHECKERS TRIES REPEATEDLY
TO BRING LIFE TO AN END
Neal Armstrong, known In police cir
cles as "Checkers," made two unsuccess
ful attempts to end his own life yester
day afternoon. The second attempt was
In a cell at the city Jail, and was frus
trated by trusties who saw him holding
his head under tho water in a bath tub.
Early In the afternoon he was taken
from the river near the foot of Douglas
street and placed in a cell, on a cot, ap
parently sleeping peacefully after restor
atives were applied.
A little whllo afterward one of the
trusties checked him In the second at
tempt on his life. He gave Illness as a
reason for his act
Nn Jumping Allnireil,
"Daumgardner and Williams are with
the Browns to stay," says Owner Bob
Hedges, He says he wouldn't let them
Jump to the Federals, even It they
wanted to.
Don't
Spread
at Hit
Top'
Thos. Kilpatrick
& Company
"Bud" Fisher
VISITING MERCHANTS BUSY
Dinner at Rome, Followed by The
ater Party at the Orpheum.
SPEECHES OUT FROM PROGRAM
Men nnd Women Here on the Sprln'ff
nuylnir Trip Are Given Ilenrly
"Welcome) nnd Made it
Feel nf Home.
The program for the visiting retail
merchants from Nebraska and the sur
rounding territory who are In Omaha
this week to do their spring buying was
devoid of all business association , last
night. .The entire evening was devoted
to tho entertainment of the visitors. A
sumptuous dinner at the Rome hotel in
augurated tho program at 6:50, followed
by a theater party at tho Orpheum.
About 400 merchants and their wives aU
tended.
There was no speechmaklng or trade
talks at the dinner and none at the
merchants offered any objections to this
negligence. Instead they rather ap
proved of it and enjoyed every minute
of tho evening of recreation. Jovial
laughter was constantly heart on all
sides at all times and there can be lit
tle doubt but what the merchants in the
city this week will sing loud praises- of '
Omaha when they return to their home
After the dinner at the Itome the mer
chants lined up in the lobby and pre
pared to march to tho theater In a body;
Hc.hlnd a three-piece banc), consisting or
a snaro drum, a baso drum and a sliver
cornet manipulated by Al Falrbrother,
tho crowd marched north on Sixteenth
street to Karnam, down Farnim to Flf
tecnth street and up Fifteenth to tho
theater. That Is some ot them followed''
the three-piece band over that route.
A full hundred of tho more' sophisticated,!
In directions In this, city, knowing full
well that tho theater was on Harney
street, calmly proceeded to make the
turn at Sixteenth and Harney streets,
thus arriving ahead of their colleagues.
Men and women marched In the parade.
Cottages at Lake Are
Threatened by Fire
Fire' of unknown cause destroyed the
cottage ot Bob Orayson at the Carter
Iake club and for a while threatened a
whole row of summer residences. The
fire department from Omaha responded
to an alarm and quenched the blaze 'in
tho Orayson place, but not before the
cottage had been nearly destroyed.
Save
Time lost because of headaches,
lassitude and depressions of bil
iousness, is vorse than wasted.
Biliousness yields quickly to the
safe, certain home remedy
BEECHAM'S
PILLS
Sold rywher. In boate, 10c, 25c
How many of to
day's Bee Want
Ads have you
read?
Sometimes a Want
Ad is as important to
you as any of the
day's affairs, the day's
mail or telegrams or
engagements. Suppose there should
bo one ad among The
Bee's Want columns
that means Money
and Opportunity to
you. It would pay you
to satisfy yourself as
to whether or not such
an ad is printed in
this issue.
Bee Want Ads have
prestige. The BEST
offers are ALWAYS
advertised in the
Want columns of Tha
Bee.
TELEPHONE
TYLER 1000
.r

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