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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, February 03, 1915, Image 1

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Da:
x
EE
DTOGTTSTJi wood a laster-a bat
THE WXATHEE
Fair; Warmer
l-tlte up-to-date businees man in
Omaha norm' the advertising col
nron of Tb De.
VOL. JAW NO. 107.
OMAHA,' WEDNESDAY MORNING, EBKUA11V 3, 3915 TWELVE PAGES.
Oa Trela aa at
otl Bews meads, M
SINGLE COPY TWO CENTS.
Omae
B
HE
CHARGES WIFE LET
ILLINOIS EX-CHIEF
' HOG HERON TRAIN
Sayi Former Governor Yatei Em
. traced Mate in Every Tunnel,
at Every Bridg-e and When '
; ''..' 4 ' Wnisjle, Blew
CAltEM MAN IS COMPLAINANT
Edward R. Freeman, Eureka, Cal.,
Photographer, Names Erstwhile
: - Executive in Suit
TWO HELD JUBILEE TOGETHER
I' SAN FRANCISCO. Feb. 3. Rlch
ard D. Yates, former governor of
Illinois,- is named as co-respondent
la a divorce complaint filed here to
day by Edward R. Freeman, a pho-
..V IT..-oL- f.1 . at I nit
i Th complaint alleges that Mrs. Free
man and Yates traveled together from
Eureka to San FranclscoNln Ju!y,-19iS.
against his wife are:
That aha permitted Tatea to hue her In
very tunnel the train vent through, at
very bridge and every time the wbiatle
blew for a crossing.
. That ahe celebrated her arrival here
with him by a jubilee at a public cafe.
'Which' name Yates . Is alleged to have
traveled, to visit her room at a hotel in
WllUts, Cal. Tatea left her, the complaint
aaya, after the alleged Jubilee In San
Francisco and went east. Irs. Freeman
returned to her husband In Eureka. They,
are aatd first to have met when Tatea
dellvereda Chautauqua lecture In Eureka
In IKS. - -
Woman's Quick Wit
Aids in Recovering
Stolen Horses
t
SIOUX FALLS. S. D., Feb. J.-(8pecial.)
The quick wit and keen observation of
a woman frustrated the plans of a daring
horse rustler and resulted In the recovery
of the stolen horses, but tle horsethlef
made his escape after firing one Ineffec
tive shot at th officers who, put on hi
trail by the , woman,' followed him to
closely that he -was 'compelled to aban
don the' stolen animals and make a'rua
for It to proven t his capture.' .
Mrs. Peter Smith, wife of the proprietor
of a store and the postof floe at Mullen,
was the heroine of the affair. She had
Just finished reading, a reward placard
which' had been sent broadcast through
Gregory county announcing a reward tor
the recovery of a bunch qf, horses r stolen
frora,'W;JV rdnefteri-e, Ai Vance,
Gregery county rancher, and the cap
'ture of th thief,1" When ahe glanced out
f -ana fit the windows and aw the horses
described ; being driven past the store.
The man driving the horse fared for
.thera .and ' returned to 'the. store for., a
lunch and to get warm, as the .day was
bitterly cold. ,As soon aa the. rustler, had
departed aha notified the officers by tel
ephone and they soon were on the cene,
taking' up the trail.. They, followed the
thief with such speed and persistency
that he abandoned the horses In a can
yon near the Snake creek crossing. While
the officer were taking possession of the
horses the rustler appeared on horseback,
on a Ml' above them. He fired one shot
at the officers and then disappeared.
Another Corrick Gets
Legislative Position!
' (From a Staff Correspondent)
LINCOLN. Feb." .-(Ppeclal.)-Further
evidence that the democratic party Is
truly grateful'for the assistance rendered
by Colonel Frank P. Corrick and his bull
noose voters In turning the republicans
out f the siate house and giving the
democrat the first -taste of the offices
they have bad for halt a century waa
g1vn when the legislature convened by
the appointment of one of Colonel Cor
rlck'a aons to a position In the senate. '
But with hearts bubbling over.: with
gratitude,, feeling-that Colonel Corrick
waa truly a life, saver, they have further
shewa their heartfelt appreciation by ap
pointing another son to a place over la
the bouse.
;:; The father
'Forecast till 7 p. m. Wednesday:.
For 'Omaha, Council Bluffs and Vicinity
-Falr; warmer. ..... . ,
Teaastcratara at
Omaha Yesterday.
. ' Hour. Deg.
a. m 17
a. 17
7 a. m l
S a. m IS
a. m..
10 a. m..
11 a. in..
12 m
1 p. m..
1 p. m..
I p. m..
4 p. m..
I p. m..
p. m..
7 p. m..
I p. m..
17
CaaaaaratlT
Laal Record.
1915. 19U. 113. 1911
.... i 4H a 11
UlShest yesterday..
Lowest yesterday 17 at
17 a
.... 19 2N
00 .00
Mean temperature 19 2n IS 4
, PrectpliaUoa 00 .00 ,00 .lb
Temperature and precipitation depar
tures from the normal:
.(Normal temperature il
Lteficlency fur tne day 2
Total excess stm-e March 1 ,., 607
Normal precipitation 03 Inch
D(iclenfy for the day Winch
Total ralufall ain- March 1....24.M Inches
l)efilruy since March 1 Indies
Ie.fti-iency for cor. period, inn. t.70 Inches
Iteflcleniy for cor. period, 112. 4.33 inciiee
Restarts from Stattaaa at T P. JM.
Station and 6lalJ Temp. High- Kaln
of Weather. I 7 p. in. est. fall.
Davenport, snow ., 27 24 .24
Dodae f'ity. cloudy 34 42 .00
Nortn Platte, cloudy 2S 32 .o
Otnaha. cloudy 20 21 .lw
hapid City, cloudy SH M .o
Miandan, cloudy... M ,l
smoux City, pC cloudy 1 LD . .01
alcntlntt, cloudy 30 32 .00
Uxiicates Ulow sera
U A- WU:U, Local Forecaster.
THAT WHITE HOUSE BApY AND HIS GRAND-DAD:
Here he is, young Francis SayYe, in the president's ann, as
he had his first picture taken.'
' . r
j ' ' ' ) ' , ,
A .4Vr
v. ; ,. ' -' . V
i -.T t .V. : T' '- 1 ' ' " i
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t. X'. ..ATI '
WHEAT SELLS $1.56
ON OMAHA MARKET
' .
Gain of Five' Cents Over Monday
t Marks' Another Record for
' - the City.
CORN IS ALSO
VERY
STRONG
. . i. ,J s..' j TZ
Wbeat on the Omaha. Grain- tx
change raade another ion'saliofial ad
vance Tuesday, going to tl.BC per
bushel, a gain of S cent' over Mon
day. Tbls wag paid for a, car !
choice stuff ' for ',' milling purposoa.
Geoerally prices were around 11.54
to $1.55. Durum sold at $1.65. 2
cents above any former top price. -'The
advance in the" price of, wheat came
with the opening of the market, when
work from Chicago indicated that the
export demand had agftin bf.come enor
mous and that millers of I'ni ted. States
were on ' the market, ready' to pay a
premium for (about anything tlint could
be converted Into flour.
Corn' was strong, prl-o ranging all the
way between ti cents and 77'4 cents per
bushel, new tops and ' a full half cent
over Monday.. '
There was another bulge in thi prices
on rye, this grain . going to SI. 25 per
bushel, three cents abovo the hlghesi
paid Monday, which waa me top ui i.ie
market. ; -' - ; " . -
Receipts Oaly Fair.
Omaha vecelpts were only lair, there
being twenty-two cars of wheat, 118 qf
corn and nineteen of . oats . on . the
market. . . .
The heavy movement of grain to the
south haa set In and it is expected to
continue for some time. Today tl.e Mis
souri Pacific took jut fifteen freight
trains, 354 curs, nearly all loaded with
wheat and "corn and all consigned to gulf
ports, -or -points In the states to the south,
southwest and southeast of Missouri.
.. Bis; Jauis) at Chicago.
CH1CAUV. Feb. S Wheat raced up
ward In . price today, first salea allowing
a Jump of as much as 3 cents a bushel.
The May delivery pouched 1.6X the top
figure to which the. market went to the
fainoua deal by James A. Tatten-Jn 19 9.
Extraordinary rises in isolations at
Liverpool: excited wheat-traders here. C.
II. Canby, president of tho Chicago Board
of Trade, said the 'Liverpool-prices were
probably duo to an advance in war risk
Insurance and to fear that submarine at
tacks would hinder the arrival of British
supplier and make .shipments from other.
j countries to Great- Britain more difficult.
On a second strong , swell the market
swept upward In the last hour to 11.64 for
May., a .gain qf 7"i. cents a bushel, com
pared with last night. Transactions In
the May option )ecame so hazardous that
the bulk, of trading shifted to the July
delivery.
Vrwency of : export, demand overruled
every other influence. It was said that
salea to the It Mian government alone In
the lest twenty-four hours amounted to
1.000.WO bushels.
Still another cent was piled on the cost
of wheat lust aa the day camo te an
end. The market' closed feverish at the
tip top pries of the suasion, with May
at fl.so. making the gain from last night
8 cents. -
Earth Shocks Are
-Felt in Yorkshire
LONDON, Feb. .-Eaith shocks oc
curred last night la districts of Yorkshire.
On miner Was killed and many had nar
row eacapea owing to the shaking down
Of coal in the pita. In sotae cases the
pits were rendered unworkable by the
fall ef coal
i in mmmmmmm ol
TAYLORWODLDKHOW
WHERE MONEY GOES
Custer County Representative Asks
for Committee to Itemize Appro
. priations for State Schools.
OPPOSES MILEAGE 'LUMP. LEVY
. " - ' . .
'i - 1 f S - .1 .1 ... . -v V .
(From a Staff Correspondent.) ,
LINCOLN, Feb. 2. (SpeciaU-It
hag been the general .opinion for
some time that Taylor of Custer would
propose something soon and that all
his time was not being spent , in an
experiment to see , how .cheaply be
could run the . legislature.. This
morning he produced a resolution
calling for a special committee of
thre to take charge of all bills cov
ering appropriations for the Univer
sity of Nebraska, its -activities, and
the normal schools, and calling for
an itemizing of all appropriations. '
Mr. Taylor condemned the' work of pre
vious legislatures In making appropria
tions directly contrary to law and said
that, sxtceu years ago the legislature
passed a 1-mlll' levy' for the maintenance
of the university.. In a lump sum and
other legislatures followed . suit. Two
years ago the legislature prsvlded for an
.&6-mlll levy for normal schools, 1700.000
all In one lump. Likewise' In Violation!
Of the law. which 'provide for Itemised
appropriation. ,
Charge ftcaliaene. .
"I charge these legislatures n. the past
with negligence of duty.',' said the Custer
county member. 1 "They have; said to the
normal authorities that 'we know nothing
about Take this t700.000.of the people's
money and -spend it as. you please.' We
have .been spending- time quibbling, over
little things, what jantlors shall receive,
how many we shall have, and the charge
shall not tie made with my consent thit
this legislature was penny wise and pound
foolish."
' lie appealed to the democrats'as a ma
jority party and to the republicans ss the
minority party when they passed H. n.
4. tRe university appropriation bill, call
ing for 11,000,000. to do se according to
law and ltejnix the appropriations.
Nerd Bsilsrss r(ri.
' "There are $2,500,000 in the three educa
tional bills," said Mr. Taylor. "Why not
say ib the governor, "We are not com
petent 'how -this shall be spent.' In the
$3,000,000 appropriated for . running the
state, why not ssy. Take It and spend
It aa you like.' Our system needs a
chanse. We must have a buslneaa sys-
ftem."
Mr. Taylor alsi demanded that each
department make a report of its expendi
tures every two years.
Mockett of Lancaster objected to the
consideration of the resolution at this
time end it went over under fhe rules.
Norton of Polk-also sent up a r solu
tion calling for more ayatem In the state's
business affairs. He. wanted consolida
tion of departments, elimination of com-
it .v,,o auu m m J . v . . . v. uuDim mm v u ,,
ducted which would give efficiency and !
also economy, although he did' not want !
the latfer to be carried out so far that
the .former would suffer. j j
Pioneer Stockman
Suffocated in Home
CHICAGO, Feb. J.-Mhhael O. Iwler,
a pioneer and one of the oldest live stock
commission men In the state, was killed
last night by sullocation In a wire which
threatened to. destroy his home. Ills son,
J. J. Lawler, was severely burned in an
attempt to rescue his father, who was a
year old and aa invalid.
FILIBUSTER CREW
CERTAIN FIGHT ON
SHIP BILL IS WON
Insurgent Dcmoi Will Support
Measure if U. 8. Ownership Tem
porary and Propreiiive Q.
0. P.i Vice Vena.
WILSON IS UP AGAINST IT
Only Allies He Can Hope for Are
Diametrically Opposed to Stand
. Upon Legislation.
LITTLE CHANCE FOR PASSAGE
WASHINGTON, Feb. 2. Extraor
dinary efforts were exerted today
and tonight by administration lead
ers of the senate to save the govern
ment ship purchase bill from threat
ened" defeat or consignment to 1
pigeonhole for this session of con
gress.
i n tn a late hour tonight with the
1 democratic majority ami BiruBBinm
the legislative dilemma, nothing but
tentative plans of proceaure had been
dlscloaod. These Included propositions for
revision of the pending bills to draw sup
port from progressive republican senators
and proposals designed to win back, at
least six of the seven democrats who
Joined with the republicans yeeteelay In
an effort to send the measure back, to
the commerce committee. 1
Activities ef Day.
Preliminary skirmishes at the capital
and White House were begun early in the
dsy. President Wilson conferred with
several progressive republican sAqator
In regard to their Ideas on th proposed
legislation, the democratlo majority con
sidered methods of procedure .o regain
Its lost ground, and the seven recal
citrant democrat conferred , among
themselves with the avowed purpoe cf
standing firm until satisfactory terms
should be presented to them.
As a result of this complicated situation
the democratic conference appointed a
sandal committee of three members, 8en
idors Fletcher, Simmons and Martin, to
conduct ' negotiations with senators of
both parties with a view to ascertaining
what support could be gained for the bill
and upon what points of revision. This
special committee waa prepared to report
progress at th second caucus late to
night and ' hold out hope to their col
leagues that ultimate success would be
their. ' '
Iaaargents Approached. .
. Revolting democrats, Senator Bank
head, Clarke. Camden, Hard wick, Hitch
cock, O'Gorman and Vardaman, were
approached by the caucus committee sev
eral times during the day and asked for
a stipulation of term upon which they
might reconsider their attitude with a
reservation that It might first be wis te
reranunlt the frJlL-. t., .
The committee waa given to understand
that there would be no change in the re-
volter' attitude toward the measure unt
ies It Was stripped .of government owner-
Ship features, with a provision that it
be understood to be an emergency under
taking with positive limitations.
' One suggestion offered' was that pro
Vision ' be made for the government to
retire from the proposed - operation of
ships -after two years.1 Another stipula
tion was aaid to be that the government
should purchase or acquire none of the
ships of belligerent nations. .
' Here They Clash.
Insofar as prohibition of purchase of
foreign ships now laid up In this country
In concerned, such a stipulation was pro
posed by some of the progressive repub
lican senators. ,Thcy, however, do not
favor the government shipping corpora
tion as a temporary measure, and sug
gested amendment whereby it would bo
Instituted as a permanent venture. Here
the proposals of progressive republican
and revolting democrats claimed. After
Senator Norrls and Senator Kenyon had
talked with President Wilson. t waa un
derstood that the president had looked
with favor upon same amendment that
might satisfy their views with regard to
permanency of the project... A direct
stipulation that the government be pro
hlbited from acquiring ships from belli
gerent. It was stated, however, waa not
favorably received, although th Intima
tion waa given that there might be no
objection to a "declaration of policy on
the subject.' and that the government did
not - contemplate purchasing ships that
might ' be the subject of international
controversy.
Another amendment, proposed by Sen
ator l-a vollette, who Is expected to sup
port the bill, was suggested a a middle-
ground with relation to th proposed
leasing of ships to private corporation
by th government. It would provide that
the government shipping corporation' in
I leasing ships should do so for a period
no longer than six months, and that all
such leases should specify the "rates,
charges and fares" to be observed in the
lessees.
After all angles of the situation had
been canvassed during the day, the sen
ate having adjourned early to await the
outcome of the aklrmlahlng, republican
leadera ere coulldenl that, their fight
against the measure had been won. Ben.
aiors nmoot, lodge, Wecka and others
aeciored that the bill waa dead. Demo
crane leaunrs, on the other hand, still
wer noperui. (
- Xeweaatle at t al
iaum feru j-b. n.-The British
. . , u,.r nririnnie arrived nrro today and
I is taking on provlsiiitia. Th vckeol will
The National Capital
Taeaday, Fehraary 3, 10 IS.
The Seaate.
Democrats caucused an-1 thin 'resumed
fight fcr adinmlstration ahlp bill.
The Haas.
Debate resumed en nival bill.
GOOD penman; one familiar with
abrttra.t work. Permanent and
' pleasant Job; out of town: good
salary.
Tot farther laforaatlea a beat
tbls opportunity IH tit Witt Ad
Kilo of toaay' Bee.
RUSSIAN OUTPOST GUARD on observation, duty
perched on top of the roof of a peasant's cottage in Poland.
1 V.
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RUSSIANS LOSE
LINE OFTREHCHES
Official Report from PetrogTad Tells
of Series of Bloody Enoounters,
Near Warsaw.
VICTORIES AT SOME POINTS
PETItOORAD, Feb. 2. Renewal of
a fierce offensive by the Germans la
the region of Sochacsew and Borjl
mow, on the road to Warsaw, is ad
mitted In an official statement Issued
here today. The violence ot the
German attack, the statement says, 1
compelled some 'of the Russian J-nU
to retire' to the second line of
trenches. The communication was
as follows: . : '
On th right bank of th lower Vistula
on January SI, our calvary mad a sud
den and successful assault upon the Ger
man line along the front between Breaun
and : lake Orezelejo, fifteen versts (ten
miles) north ef Slerpec, capturing many
officers and soldiers. . '
"The attempt of th Germans on the
Soth to open the offensive movement In
the direction of Lipno and DoBroyn. sup
ported by artillery fire, wa checked. .
"On the left bank of . the Vistula front
at the village of Makow and Dyblln the
enemy waa thrown back to the line of the
villages ot Welese and Naslgnewo, north
west of Wloclawek. The Oermans In re
treating abandoned at Makow many of
their dead,
German . Take and Los Trenches.
"In the course of the. day of January
U, th enemy, after having concentrated
In the region of Sochacsew, Boltmlvo, and
south of Bollrolvo, a large force of artil
lery developed active operations against
our position with very considerable force.
The German offensive wa distinguished
by great ' tenacious, ' advancing In close
ranks strongly, supported from th rear
"After having concentrated a violent
fir In the morning upon that' region,
the fierceness of the German oftenalve
compelled some of our .uiitts tto rttlre to
th ecpnd line of trenches." .
"In the meanwhile a counter, attack
from another detachment .of our force
drove the enemy from all the trenohe
occupied by him,' Inflicting upon him en
ormous losses.
Lm First Lin of Trenches.
"Simultaneously, with . this . attack.. on
Borjimow, the Germans delivered a series
ot ferocious sssaults against oar ' front
between the villages of Goumlne, Bour-
gade and Moghely. These attacks were)
supported by heavy artillery fire. Up to;
midday of January St every one of these
assault was driven back by us, some by
our rifle fire and with the bayonet. --But
between midday and I p. m. cf January
31, the Germans .were successful ' In oc
cupying a part of our trenches. . In this
they wer helped .largely . by an energetic
and sustained artillery fire. A little
after I o'clock we undertook a general
counter attack.! This wa successful and,'
as a result of It, the enemy the evening
of January 31, retained but a tittle por
tion of our first line trenches, together
with a certain chateau In" tht country.
It can b aald the success of the Ger
mane January (1 In the vicinity of BorJJ
maw were relatively ' Inslgniricant com
pared to the losses we Inflicted . on ' the
enemy with ou. artillr-ry fire, our coun
ter attack and our bayonet charges. Ac
cording to reports from our military chiefs
the Russian artillery inflicted Immense
damage on the Germans. Our guns dis
persed dense gatherings of German In
fantry and reduced their batteries to si
lence; this mude it possible for us to re
sist their fierce attack. "
Mare riahtlaar la Carpathian.
"Th fighting In the Carpathians con
tinues. In spite of the reported partici
pation of fresh Austrian troops, which,
up to the present time have actually
appeared on ourfront, we were success-'
ful In repelling every endeavor ot th
enemy to. assume the offensive In the
vicinity ot Mount Beskld and Mount
Wysxkow, and w are continuing to ad-
(.Continued B i'u '!, Coluiuu Fvur.)
t
;'!--. I
. .-."'j-vv;;, fc- '
GERMAN DAMAGES
CANADIAN BRIDGE
Officer of Kaiser's Army Under Ar
rest in Maine for. Trying to
Destroy Structure.
HE CALLS IT AN ACT CF WAR
mr ,
VANCEBORO, Me., Feb. 2. An
attempt to .destroy the railroad
bridge spanning the St. Croix river,
which forms the International boun
dary line betweejf eastern Maine and
New Brunswick., was made early to
day. One of. the three spana ot the
structure wag blown up by dynamite,
The attack on the bridge caused
great excitement on the New Bruns
wick: side, where rumors, of a Ger
man plot spread rapidly and resulted
In an Immediate Investigation by. the
provincial authorities.
.Inquiry ws also begun on this side
and this led to the arrest at a local
hotel . ef a man who gave his nam as
Werner Van Home. According ' to ' th
police, thi prisoner said he wa an officer
In the service ot Germany, but refuted
to divulge his rank. 'The police say he
admitted that he exploded the dynamite
under a section of the bridge and that a
dynamite cap and a plan ot the bridge
were found in hi pockets. Van Home
says he I 37 years old.
The arrest wss 4nade by Deputy Bherlf
George W. Ho a, who was accompanied by
two Canadian , officers from McAdani
Junction, New Brunswick. II was re
moved to' the United States Immigration
rooms where he was closely guarded.
Deputy sheriff Rosa notified th United
State marshal and the United States
district attorney at Portland, asking for
instruction. ' .
.. Call ' It , Act f : Wnr.
Asked why he had dynamited th brides,
the prisoner, the police ' say; made the
simple explanation that' his country wa
t war with Great Britain,' and that Can
ada was a part of the 'enemy' country.
He said that he ram frpm Now York.
-The bridge; I the connecting link be
tween th Maine . Central .and. tho. Canadian-Pacific
tracks, theCanedlanTaclflo
having traffic-' rights cer i the' former
road from Mattawamkeag -to the boun
dary. . Tht , lu-i the through route front
upper and western Canada to'the Mari
time provlncea,' directly "connecting Mon
treal with the ports of St.'-John and Hall
fax. ' - . . ; . . , :, ; ,
-In th winter season St John, N. B., Is
the principal eastern -port" of Canada aud
thither have come from - Montreal an 1
further" west' great - quantities of provi
sions . and other . munition of war ' for
shipment . to England and . Franc. The
shipment have passed over th bridge
which It wa sought to destroy.
Waald Delay Wer flaps-lies.
-Tbls Is th moat direct. rout from th
west, ' ai, ' cutting across the state of
Maine, It Is several hundred miles shorter
than the northern route operated by th
Canadian government. " hkh follows th
St, Lawrence river to Little Metis, Quebec,
and. then turns south . of Moncton, fit.
John and Halifax. The loe of th bridge
would delay, but not interrupt the trans
portation war materials to the ooast.
Home was made a prisoner of the sta
rli.MVne. To avoid possible compllca
licam tlK- local authorities made no tur
.r mve pending advice from th fed
ertl. government. The Canadian author
ities indicated they would Immediately
niake representation at Washington with
a view to extradition on the ground that
dynamiting baa been done on th Cana
dian aid of the border. On the other
hand. It was said that Home would b
defended against extradition basing his
claim for th protection ot the United
States on his assertion that he bad com
mitted an act of war and that hta of
fense waa political.
Railroad officials, after a careful ex
amination of the bridge, declared th ex
plosion had been a failure a far as
damag wa concerned. Sleeper wer
blown out. th rails were twisted and a
girder wa damaged, but th foundation
Continued on Pag Two, Column Four.)
0flt , In .Hi iTl,BMMTfc
'TEUTONS DEGIII
LONG PROJECTED
ilOVEJlPOLAND
Germans Are. Apparently Executing
.Their Plan for General Move
ment Toward the City
of Warsaw.
FIGHT FOR MOUNTAIN PASSES
Austriani , Making Desperate Ef
forts to Get Possession of Three
' Strategic Points.
RAIDERS SCARE BRITISH SHIPS
The Day's War News
KEW GERM A attack en the Waw
mot frwat ha led t mmc f the
heaviest ftahtlaw ot the war In
the vast tkas tar. Aa nttlrlal
statement leaned from Pet roar a 4
admit the Uersnan saereedrl
la earrylaa Ttnsntaa trenches In
the realen f Ssessiew and MrJ-
sear th Vlatala and ahont
thirty nation went ef Waronw, hat
were . f small Importance cm
narrd with the loaaea they .
talaed.
BATTLE far possession at th Car
pathian sweatee ennttnne-e wlthaat
definite - nettM for either th
Rnealaa or Anatrtnn.
CRK4T BRITAIN ha declared
fnodstnffs deatlned for Uernssr,
Anatrla or TarUey contraband of
LONDON, Feb. 8. The--, Germ ann,.
after a long period of preparation,
appear today, Judging from r porta
reaching; London, to be putting into
execution their plans for an advance
on Warsaw. At the same time the
Austrtans seem to have renewed their
forward - movement In tbe Car
pathian mountains. .
The fighting In the Carpathians la
expected to decide for the period of
the war the mastery of threw moftt
Important passes through the moun
tains Ussok,' DuJtla and Wyszko-y.
The strategic value of these passes la
Indicated by the fact that Wystkow"
la almost. due south of Lemberg,
while -Ussok Is In the same relative
position frora Pnemysl, and Dukl'
ts situated similarly with regards to
Cracow.' The fighting, apparently baa
not yet assumed full proportions, but
the Austro-Germaa concentration la
progressing, notwithstanding Rus
sian harassment.. .'"?.'"
Flore Fights Near La Bilitc. "
Spirited - contest also ar In progress
In , the western war sone, the German
having ' made , attack . In force rat La
Bassee and along the coast. The French
assert that th battle at LaBaasee has
not resulted In a change ot positions,
while along the coast the German attack
la directed at tbe recovery ot th Great
Dun an artillery, position near Lom
baertsyde, which, however, remains In
the possession of the alllety
'London's Zeppelin scare of last night,
now appears to have been in th nature
of a rehearaal. No foundation Is discov
erable for th rumor that German air
craft were traveling ever Dover. Th
firing by the Dover fort 1 said to have
been a warning to ships which omitted to
comply with port regulations.
Th German submarine raiders, at-
though not knowa poalttvrly to have been
in the Irish Sea within the last twenty
four hours, aim hold lit port a majority
ot tli coasting ' steamers and fishing
boats. '
'Liverpool Insurance ' men are quoting
rate approximately tour times the former
figures. , . .....
From South Africa comes the news that
arrangements are under way for the sur
render ofv the Rebel Leaders Merits and
Kemp. It la stated that they have dm
greed with their German adviser. i
Italian Reserves '
In London Warned
LONDON. Feb. t The Italian reserv
ists living In London have been warned to
be prepared to respond to a call to the
color a
Don't Worry
About the i
Farmer
lie may have his troubles;
but he's the man on top today.
Mr. Farmer is adding up the
increasing profits cf his gran,
aries, stables and feeding lots
each day and speculating
where to invest his surplus.
-Farm Land i3 his favorita
investment and he will find tha
the best land offerings in the
classified columns of today's
Bee.
' Telephone Tyler 1000 ,
THE On AHA BEE
"Everybody Read Ilea Want lils

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