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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, July 28, 1919, Image 7

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THE BEE: OMAHA, MONDAY, JULY 28, 1919.
AUTOMOBILES.
Fnr Ra)
... .. ik ror air. amtth
rs u nn luf air, omun.
WHEN you (hlnk of uaad cars, think at
Cars for Hire.
wps AND LARGE CARS rOR HIRB.'
i;.V- v '"""": w raaaonabl
Sorvtea Oaracs, , lta and Farnam
v Tires and SuoDliea.
FllS" f.h',' ,ubJ,c l aanunatlon, ur
,l00-mll cuaranta.d jr at ihM
. Plata. Non.Bkift
" ' I'. i Ml
ii it
"
prapaia won cua acocmpanl.
order. '
Standard Tire Co..
418 North th BL Phon. Douel 1(110
NEW TIRES 1.2 PRTPF.
Firestone, Contrail, t Pullman, risk.
Writ for prlcaa. M.ntton aizes.
KAIMA.N TIRE JOBBER8, ? Farnaw.
nit - -rrr
rati earl and rsbulla tirea by Drr-Cur.
ney 8L
GAIN mora mllea; hava your tlrei re.
irraaeo oy u. & o. Tlra Co.
1415 Leavenworth. Tyler 1J1-W.
Repairing and Painting.
r. P. BARNU.M CO.. 2125 Cumin,. Doug-,
lai flH. High grade automoblla palatine.
Motorcycles and Bicycles.
BARLEY .DAVIDSON MOTORCYCLES
Bargalna In used macblnea. Victor It
Rooa, tha Motorcycla man. I7tb and
Leavenworth Streeta jf.
FOR SALE Uaed bicycle tit g-lrl. t to
I years oja; rirei-ousa condition, wiu
aell at a" aacrlfice It takfcn at onca.
Phope Harney ISIS.
PERSONAL.
THE SALVATION Army lnduitrlal home
aoucui your oia clothln. furniture,
magailnei. We collect We distribute
Phone Dou. 4135 and our waion will
can. can ana Inspect our new home.
,mi-ma-iii4 Donga St.
SHAMPOO with Skinner's Dope, all barber
ehopa and barber aupply houses, for
jailing nair anaantiruff.
Horses Live Stock Vehicles.
" BROOD SOWS
Buy en Blrdhavin Profit 8bartnv Plan.
Phone Web. 2884. O. S. Pettli, Ageat
Harneu, Saddle! and Trunka
W Make Them Ouraelvei.
ALPytED CORNISH & CO.. 1210 B-araam
ONE 6-year-old 1400-lb. work hone; light
and double harneu and heavy wagon
gear. 4938 North Eighteenth.
MONEY TO LOAN.
LOANS ON DIAMONDS,
WATCHES, ETC.
EAGLE LOAN OFFICE
1301 DOUGLAS 8T.
ORGANIZED by the Bualnesi Men of
Omaha. FURNITURE, planoa and
notei ai security. fiO ( mo., H. gooda.
total, 13.60.
PROVIDENT LOAN SECURITY,
! Security Bldg. 16th ft Farnam. Ty. 666.
FARMS and city loans.
. H. LOUGEE, INC..
tin Keellne wag-
An Inventor has patented an
aquarium that can be lighted with
electric lamps supported above it
with a shade that directs their rays
Into the water.
WOOD
For
Bakeries, Fuel Yards and
Brick and Tile Factories.
Unusually Low Prices.
BUY NOW
DES MOINES
SAWMILL CO.,
Des Moines, Iowa.
BRINGING UP FATHER-
See Jiff and Maggie in Full
Pag of Color, in Tha Sunday Baa.
Drawn for The Bee by McManus
Copyright 1919 International News Service.
t0 -THAT l
THE VAX HE
t tPENOINCj
Ht- TIME!
ffX NOW ACT SOMEONE TO 1 I , (
VVI Point OUT THE 0OKE OE. t
fGik spoof ro you then et
f-J ACQUAtlNYEO t WANT Tift Ch.
' MEET HIM I -- aSM .vV
m
n,;.n.
'I ,l
t
(OIONY TELL YOU 1H " "Z
TO MEET THE U ,
uuY't IS lTEAO 1 VHAT AtE XOU
TrS ) ND VOU Si' iV- TALKtN' AOOT- fW)
A MTEO? VATH -v THAT WUZ. r fj
'
POTASH EXPERT
TO TESTIFY AS
TO CONDITIONS
Dr. Cameron Will' Tell Result
of Investigation of Mines
in France and
Germany.
By E . C. SNYDER.
(Staff Correspondent of The Omaha Bee.)
Washington Bureau, Omaha Bee,
Washington, D. C, July 27.
Through the activity of Judge Kin
kaid, the Nebraska potash people,
now in Washington, urging upon
the ways and means committee re
lief from threatened disaster if for
eign ootash is nermitted to come
into the country without some pro
tective features thrown around the
domestic product, will be given a
supplemental hearing Monday morn
ing.
Primarily the hearing has been
called to get a line on the foreign
potash situation. Dr. Cameron of the
bureau of mines having gone to
Europe early in the spring to make
a survey of potash conditions, both
n France and Germany. ,
Judge Green of Iowa, a member
of the ways and means committee,
said that the potash bill would fol
low the dye bill and if the license
feature is adopted, as now seems
certain, in the dye bill he thought it
entirely likely that the potash bill
would carry the same provisions,
icensing the foreign product for two
rears. While Judge Green admitted
there was some opposition among
the republican members of the com
mittee to the license feature he
thought the majority of the repub
licans on the committee would support-
it.
"The democrats on the committee
will favor the license feature on dye
sturfs, said Mr. Green, but will op
pose a license of foreign potash be
cause the farmers of the south are
against it. However, I have hopes
that both bills will have license fea
tures attached when reported."
r THE
WOMAN IN BLACK
By EDMUND CLERIHEW BENTLEY
'Copyright, 1919. by the Century Company. -
CHAPTER XXXV.
Manderson Ducloses His Purpose.
"Now on that Sunday night Man
derson knew that I was practically
without any money in the world. He
knew that Bunner knew it, too. He
may have known that I had even
borrowed a little more from Bunner
for .pocket-money until my next
check was due, which, owing to my
anticipation of my salary, would not
have oeen a large one,. Bear this
knowledge of Manderson's 'in mind.
"As soon as I had brought the car
round I went into the library and
stated the difficulty to Manderson.
"What followed gave me, slight as
it was, my first impression of some
thing odd being afoot. As soon as
I mentioned the word 'expenses' his
hand went mechanically to his left
hip-pocket, where he always kept a
little case containing notes to the
value of about a hundred pounds in
our money. This was such a rooted
habit in him that I was astonished
to see him check the movement sud
denly. Then, to my greater amaze
ment, he sweve viciously under his
breath. 1 had never heard him do
this before; but Bunner had told me
that of late he had often shown irri
tation in this way when they were
alone. 'Has he mislaid his note
case?' was the question that flashed
through my mind. But it seemed to
me that it could not affect his plan
at all, and I will tell you why. The
week before, when I had gone up to
London to carry out various com
missions, including the booking of
a berth for Mr. George Harris, I had
drawn a thousand pounds for Man
derson from his bankers; and all, at
his request, in notes of small
amounts. I did not know what this
unusually large sum in cash was for;
but I did know that the packets of
notes were in his locked desk in the
library, or had been -earlier, in the
day, when I had seen him fingering
them as he sat at a desk.
"But instead of turning to the
desk, Manderson stood looking at
me. There was fury in his face, and
it was a strange sight to see him
gradually master it until his eyes
grew cold again. 'Wait in the car,'
he said slowly. 'I will get some
money.' We both went out, and as
I was getting into my overcoat in
the hall I saw him enter the draw
ing room, which, you remember,
was on the other side of the en
trance hall.
"I stepped out onto the lawn be
fore the house and smoked a cigaret,
pacing up and down. I was asking
myself again and again where that
thousand pounds was; whether it
was in the drawing-room; and if so,
why. Presently, as I passed one of
the drawing-room windows, I no
ticed Mrs. Manderson's shadow on
the thin silk curtain. She was stand
ing at her escritoire. The window
No. 8 of a seriei of statement!
showing why so many men are in
vesting in Omaha Heal Estate.
The Supply of Omaha Real Estate Is Limited
No More oj It Will Be Manufactured.
These Facts Make Real Estate a Desirable
Investment.
AN INVESTMENT WHICH IS SAFE, PAYS A
GOOD INCOME, AND INCREASES IN VALUE
IS A DEPENDABLE INVESTMENT.
AN INVESTMENT IN OMAHA REAL ESTATE
HAS ALL THESE ADVANTAGES.
This statement No. 5 gives mpre evidence of
the fact that Omaha real estate is continually in
creasing in value.
(tl Instances nn reenrA of laxce nrofits havinor
been made in Omaha real estate show that these
increases have not been made in any specific time
or period.
(b) Thesg instances show, too, that one does not
have to -have a lot of money to make a profit in
Omaha real estate.
' SOME EXAMPLES:
George L. Martini, March 2$, 191&, bought a house
at 3309 Webster, for $4,250. He sold May 26,
1919, to. D. S. Finkenstein for $5,250. ,
Fred J. Taylor a few days ago bought an incom
pleted bungalow at Twenty-third and Castelar for
$3,950. He sold it three days later to Emil R.
Schmidt for $4,150. The house is not yet com
pleted. W. J. Nagle bought a bouse at 4335 Cass, in 1915,
for $2,750. Lived in it four years (no rent to pay),
and sold it this year for $3,500.
NOTE E. E. Peake, big realtor of Kansas City, one of Omaha's rival
cities, in a speech to the Omaha Real Estate Board, June 5, said Omaha
will have 500,000 population in ten years. He's one of many ccftiserva
tive men who have that opinion.
OMAHA REAL ESTATE BOARD,
308 S. 18th Street, Omaha, Nab, U. S. A.
was open, and as I passed I heard
her say: 'I have not quite thirty
pounds here. Will thafbe enough?'
i am not near the answer, but next
moment. Manderson's shadow was
mingled with hers, and I heard the
chink of money. Then, as he stood
by the window, and as I was mov
ing away, these words of hs came to
my ears and these at least I can
repeat exactly, for astonishment
stamped them on my memory I'm
going Out now. Marlowe has per
suaded, me to go for a moonlight
run in the car. He is very urgent
about it. He says it will help me
to sleep, and I guess he is right.'
"I have told you that in the course
of four years I had never once heard
Manderson utter a direct lie abou'
anything great or small. I believed
that I understood the man's queer
skin-deep morality, and I could have
sworn that if he was firmly pressed
with a question that could not be
evaded he would either refuse to
answer or tell the truth. But what
had I just heard? No answer to
any question. A voluntary state
ment, precise in terms, that was ut
terly false. The unimaginable had
happened. It was almost as if one's
dearest friend, in a moment of clos
est sympathy, had suddenly struck
one in the face. The blood rushed
to my head, and I stood still on the
grass. I stood there until I heard
his step at the front door, and then
I pulled myself together and stepped
quickly to the car. He handed me
a banker's paper bag with gold and
notes in it. 'There's more than
you'll want there,' he said, and I
pocketed it mechanically.
ror a minute or so I stood dis
cussing with Manderson it was by
one or those tours de force of which
one's mind is capable under great
excitement certain points about the
route of the long drive before me.
I had. made the run several times by
day, 'andi I believe I spoke quite
calmly and naturally about it. But
while I spoke my mind was see'thing
in a flood of suddenly-born suspi
cion and fear. I did not know what
I leared. I simply felt fear, some
how I did not know howconnect
ed with Manderson. My soul once
opened to it, fear rushed in like an
assaulting army. I felt I knew
that something was altogether
wrong and sinister, and I felt myself
to be the object of it. Yet Mander
son was surely no enemy of mine.
Then my thoughts reached out wild
ly for an answer to the question vhy
he had told that lie. And all the
time the blood hammered in my
ears: 'Where is that money?' Rea
son struggled hard to set up the
suggestion that the two things were
not necessarily connected? The in
stinct of a man in danger would not
listen to it. As we started, and the
car took the curve into the road, it
was merely the unconscious part of
me that steered and controlled it,
and that made occasional empty re
marks as we slid along in the moon
light. Within me was a confusion
and vague alarm that was far worse
than any definite terror I, ever felt.
"About a mile from the house,
you remember, one passed on one's
left a gate on the other side of which
was the golf-course. There Man
derson said he would get down, and
I stopped the car. 'You've got it
all clear?' he asked. With a sort of
wrench I forced myself to remem
ber and repeat the directions given
me. 'That's O. K.,' he said. 'Good
by, then. Stay with that wallet'
These were the last words I heard
him speak as the car moved gently
away from him."
Marlowe rose from his chair and
pressed his hands to his eyes. He
was flushed with the excitement of
his own narrative, and there was in
his look a horror of recollection that
held both the listeners silent. He
shook himself with a movement like
a dog's, and then, his hands behind
him, stood erect before the fire as
he continued his tale.
"I expect you both know what
the back-reflector of a motor car
is?"
Trent nodded quickly, his face
alive with anticipation; but Mr. Cup
pies, who cherished a mild but ob
stinate prejudice against motor cars,
readily confessed to ignorance.
"It is a small round or more often
rectangular mirror," Marlowe ex
plained, "rigged but from the right
side of the screen in front of the
driver, and adjusted in such a way
THOUSANDS SEEK
RELIEF IN PARK
BATHING POOLS
Streets Present Deserted Ap
pearance During Heat of
Day Resorts Taxed
to the Limits.
Practically deserted, the streets
of Omaha presented a new and
strange spectacle. Judged by the
number of pedestrians on the
streets the metropolis of the state
would be called a village. The in
tense heat had driven residents to
the parks and bathing beaches and
as a consequence but few people
were to be found on the downtown
streets, generally crowded. Those
Omahans who had not fled to the
parks to escape the heat remained
indoors, unwilling to venture out
into the sweltering heat.
The mercury soared to 101 at 5
o clock.
Towards evening' when the heat
subsided to some extent thousands
swarmed into the soft drink and
ice cream parlors.
Parks and bathing beaches were
crowded to capacity. Anticipating
an extremely hot day thousands
upon thousands of Omahans began
congregating at these places in the
morning. By noon it seemed that
all attendance records were to be
shattered. Many thousands sought
relief from the heat at Riverview,
Elmwood and the Fontenelle parks.
Miller park also swarmed with visit
ors throughout the day. Long lines
of both men and women awaited an
opportunity to plunge into the
waters of Lake Manawa and Carter
lake. Municipal beach was taxed to
capacity. Ofhcials and life guards es
timated the crowd as the largest that
had ever ' assembled at that place.
Equally well patronized was Sandy
Point beach on the other side of the
lake. Here bathing facilities were
so taxed that patrons were forced -to
await their turn. The same was true
of Manawa.
Many people found relief from
the heat at Krug park. The recently
constructed pool attracted the great
est number of people and a con
stant stream of men and women and
children awaited their turn to
plunge into its cool depths.
Numerous picnickers were in evi
dence in the public parks.
Motorists sought relief, in the
country, the various highways lead
ing from Omaha- being crowded
with machines.
" Now York state now has 525,000
motor cars, or more than 10 per
cent, of the 5,000,000 in the United
States.
that he can see, without turning
round, if anything is coming up be
hind to pass him. It is quite an or
dinary appliance, and there was one
on his car. As the car moved on,
and Manderson ceased speaking be
hind me, I saw in that mirror a
thing that I wish I could forget."
Marlowe was silent for a moment,
staring at the wall before him.
"Manderson's face," he said in a
low tone. "He was standing in the
road, looking after me, only a few
yards behindn, and the moonlight
was full on his face. The mirror
happened to catch it for an instant.
"Physical habit is a wonderful
thing. I did not shift hand or foot
on the controlling mechanism ' of
the car. Indeed, I dare say it stead
ied me against the shock to have
myself braced to the business of
driving. You have read in books, I
dare say, of hell looking out of a
man's eyes, but perhaps you don't
know what a good metaphor that is.
If I had not known Manderson was
there, I should not have recognized
the face. It was that of a madman,
distorted, hideous in the imbecility
of hate, the teeth bared in a simian
grin of ferocity and triumph, the
eyes ! In the little mirror I had
this glimpse of the face alone; I
saw nothing of, whatever gesture
there may have been as that writh
ing white mask glared after me.
And I saw it only for a flash. The
car went on, gathering speed, and
as it went, my brain, suddenly
purged of the vapors of doubt and
perplexity, was as busy as the
throbbing engine before my feet. I
knew.
(Continued Tomorrow.)
Burns, Brinker& Company
ESTABLISHED IN 1902 J
Announce the Removal of Theiv Offices to the
SOUTHWEST CORNER 17TH AND
DOUGLAS STREETS
GROUND FLOOR BRANDEIS THEATER BUILDING
You are cordially invited to visit our new quarters,
where every facility is offered for the purchase
and sale of investment bonds and stocks.
My HEART and
My HUSBAND
Adele Garrison's New Phase of
Revelations
of a Wife
What Madge Faced When She
Reached the School
Alice Holcombe, preoccupied,
anxious, looked up with a relieved
smile from the big desk in the prin-
cipal s office as I entered the room,
a full half-hour earlier than my
wont.
"So you are down early, too," she
commented. "I am mighty glad to
see you. Mr. Stockbridge telephoned
last night that there was a certain
set of reports which had to be sent
to the state school authorities to
day, and I can't find them any
where. I've got some work up in
my room that simply must be done
this morning, and I'm at my wits
end."
"Let me try," I said as cheerfully
as I knew how, for I saw that she
was much upset. "The members of
my family consider me a wizard at
finding things."
"Oh, I am relieved 1" she said
gratefully. "But I don't see where
he could have put them."
"Where did he say they were?"
Madge Questions.
"In the right-hand drawer of the
desk."
"Did he specify which one?"
She looked at me startled.
"No, but he must have meant the
big desk, of course. You know the
righthand drawers of the other desk
must contain only his private pa
pers,., for he has never given us ac
cess to them."
"Did he ever forbid you in so
many words to go into the right
hand drawers?" I asked.
"No o," she hesitated. "But we
have always understood him to
mean that."
I pondered a moment.
"Have you looked everywhere
else except in these right-hand
drawers of the small desk?"
"I have searched everything
thoroughly she replied. "They are
positively in none of the usual
places. I would believe Mr. Stock
bridge had left them at home if it
weren't for . the fact that he
never forgets where he puts things.
When he says the righ-hand drawer
of a desk he means exactly that
thing."
I knew the methodical methods of
the woman before me well enough
to be sure of another fact. If she
said the missing reports were in
none of the usual places there was
no need for me to follow in her
tracks.
I put another pertinent question.
A Secret Session.
"These reports is it absolutely
necessary that they be found?"
"Oh, yes. Mr. Stockbridge was
most insistent about their being
sent today.'
"Then there is but one thing to
do," I said briskly, "and that is to
look into the locked drawers of this
smaller desk."
She drew a long breath, picked
up the bunch of keys which I had
last seen clenched in Milly Stock
bridges fingers, and extended them
to me.
"Then you'll have to do it," she
said. "You have the right, . you
The Ideal Family Loaf.
Patronize Your
Neighborhood Grocer
JAY BURNS BAKING CO
AMTSEMENT8
IV TME HOME OF PICNICS J
Many Clean Amusements
BATHING
DANCING-RIDES
THRILLS
PICNIC GROUNDS
FREE ATTRACTION THIS WEEK
flronty Brothers
in Their Awa-Inaplrinf Norelty Act
on til High Double Perch
at 9 o'clock.
TWO SHOWS IN ONE
MARIETTE'S MANIKINS. A Aitonlih.
Ing Mechanical Nswlty: MAREENO. NEVARO
A MAREENO: TRIBBLE THOMAS: LOUIS
LONDON. Photoplay Attraction HALE
HAMILTON la "MIS BROTHER'S PLACE."
FATTY ARBUCKLE COMEDV. OUTING
CHESTER. PAT HE WEEKLY.
know he left us with equal author
ity, but I simply can't go into those
drawers. I know "him too well."
There was an agony of protest in
her voice that silenced the objec
tions upon my own lips. And the
next instant pitying comprehension
seized me.
Alice Holcombe believed that se
creted in Kenneth Stockbridge's
desk were mementoes of a lost love
that he had cherished. The heart
which cherished so faithful, so hope
less a love for him could not stand
the certain knowifdge of his love
for some one else that even a casual
inspection of his desk might bring
to her.
L
Edison's Associate Dies.
Chicago, July 27. Frederick Saii
gent, an early associate of Thomas
A. Edison, and a mechanical and
electrical engineer of international
reputation, died Saturday. He was
credited with greatly reducing the
cost of electricity and making, avail
able to nearly the whole population
the use of electrical energy for oper
ating scores of devices in home and
office. He was one of the first to
advocate the use of the steam tur
bine in electric power houses, which
reduced the cost of producing electricity.
MANY TOURISTS
SEE WONDERS OF
SOUTHDAKOTA
Agricultural Districts Pros
perous, Although Hay Crop
Is Short Due to Dry
Weather.
T. E. Handlin of Sturds. S. D.
former state auditor, is highly en
thusiastic over the outlook for th
Black Hills country. He is in
Omaha on a short business trip and
says although the north part of the
state has had but little rain and
hay is short, the state, taken as a
whole, is enjoying unusual pros
perity. "The Black Hills as a tourist
country is coming into its own,"
said Mr. Handlin. "Hundreds of
Nebraska people have visited there
this month and many more are ex
pected in August. Thousands of
eastern people have visited Crystal
Cave and Sylvan lake. Camping
places have been arranged in the
various cities for auto parties.
"Omaha is directly interested in
the growth of this section of South
Dakota. The Black Hills country
purchases practically all of their
goods here and as our country de
velopes yours is forced to grow.
"The cities in the Black Hills are
awake to the opportunity and are
ciiiuuiagiiig iuui lais iu vistv wi; mai-
ural wonders of the state. Sturgii
has purchased Yohr park which it
free to tourists and preparations are
being made to construct a large
swimming pool which will be fret
to visitors. Other cities in this sec
tion are also making improvements'
tor the benefit of tourists."
Skinner's the Best
Macaroni and Spaghetti .
Recipe Book Free Omaha
PHOTOPMTS.
Monday
Tuesday
The B. F. Goodrich Rubber Co.
Present the Novel Picture
THE ARMY TRANSPORT
CORP IN STUNTS
On Coast-to-Coast Journey
i m - - - w a
Presents
"STOLEN
ORDERS"
1 "Yvonne From Paris"
JACK PICKFORD
"Bill Apperson's Boy"
and
"THE GHOST OF
SLUMBER MOUNTAIN"
The animals that lived before the
dawn of time.
V
L
Norma
Talmadge
in
"The Social Secretary
LOTHROP4
TODAY
ANNA Q. NI1XSON ta
"THE WAY OF THE STRONG" '
Opportunity knocks at your door
every time you read The Bee Want
Ads. ,
As You Stand at the
Station
1 II Mill .H II
you thrill with
pride whan
you not the
admiring glances at your
luggage.
The trunk, of course, it
an Oshkoah wardroba
you would have no other
whan you know its eon-
enience when year after year you note Us ability to with
stand the hard knocks of trayel when you see how much bet
ter it looks even now after months of hard usage.
And your luggage you had the right tip when you bought it
with the trunk. We told you we knew luggage that we handled
only the lines which we knew were superior.
We build luggage and we tell it consequently our word a to
fitness should be right. We are glad to have you ask us about it.
1209
Farnam
Douglas
480
OMAHA
TRUNK FACTORY

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