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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, January 11, 1921, Image 12

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THIS L. 'TUESDAY. JANUARY 11. 1921.
12
TI1&TUEC?
PITER
IX.', ! 'J(
Helping Jimmy Rabbit. .
.Peter Mink was feeling even more
peevish than usual. And this was the
reason: Jimmy Rabbit bad a new
sled. .
Now, I'etcr had never owned ,a
sled: and it made him envVnn to see
Now you simply can't fall cB
Peter said . ' i
what a good time Jimmy was having, !
coasting down the skle of - Blue
mountain., ' " t
There was only one thing that
Fimmy Rabbit did not like about his i
sled. It went so fast that he always
fell off long before he reached' the
end of the -slide.
"I can fix that." Peter Slink told
liim.. "You go home and borrow
your father's hammer and a few
nails, and I'll show you how you can
roast 'way down into Pleasant Val
ley without once tumbling off. ,
Jimmy thanked him. And he, hur
ried home at once.-'- He dragged his
new slid after him, tool for he was
afraid that if he left it behind he
might not he able Jo find Peter Mink
-r-or the sled, either when he came
back aeain: ' .
But Peter did not seem to ' care.a
Perhaps he had something dn his
mind. Anyhow, when Jimmy Rab
bit returned'-with-the. hammer and
nails, Peter . Mink, was wailing pa
tently for him) '.
'Now, ; then," said Pclef, -as he
took the nails and the hammer, :"you
sit on the sled, Jimmy, and 111 fix
you up in no time." . .
So Jimmy Rabbit sat dowivon his
new sled. -And in a few minutes
Peter .'.Mink had nailel Jimmy's
trousers fast to the sled.' .
"Now. vou simplv can't fair off'!
Peter said. , "111 give you a push?
and the first thing you know, you 11
vi niMiivii vvvii vniki
11 .' j
be down in the valley.
Jimmy Rabbit said to himself that
Peter Mink was very bright, to think
of such a splendid plan as nailing his
trousers to the sled. He thanked
Peter: and he gripped the sled
, tightly though he didn't need to
while Peter gave him a push.' that
.sent him flying down the mountain
side. !
Though he went like the wind, he
never fell off oijce. And soon he
was down in Pleasant -Valley, skim
ming over the fust which covered
the drifts m Farmer Green's meadow.
At last the sled stopped. And then
Jimmy Rabbit decided that Peter
Mink had forgotten something. How
was he to. get off the sled with his
trousers nailed fast to it? Atl what
"would his mother say. when she saw
.the nail-holes, in his, trousers? And
vhat would his father do, 'when he
saw the nails in Jimmy's new sled?
Tt was not very pleasant for Jimmy
Rabbit, sitting all alone in the
meadow, with such thoughts running
through diis head.
After'e had sat .there; a "while
Jimmy heard somethiqg that worried
him even more. He heard, old dog
Spot barking. -A-. d he saw that he
would be in a good deal of a fix if
Spot should happen to come along
and find him. For he cqjuldu't stir
from his sled. A- ;
'i ' Jimmy began to hate that sfed.
He wished he had never seen it. . .
And then he heard somebody scam
pering over the crust. He was' al
most too frightened to look around
to see who it was. But he turned
his head. And he was glad to find
that it was' Peter Mink, .who had
run all the way down from' Blue
mountain.
''You had a fine ride, didn't. you?"
sail' Peter Mink. " -'.'
"Yes." Jimmy answered. '''But. I
liked ttie beginning of it better tiian
the end." :
"Why. what's the matter?" Peter
inquired. ' - .
"I can't get off the sled," Jimmy
aid. ' ' . . V ' 'v
Peter Mink ' pretended to' be sur
prised. And lie, said that he 'hadn't
thought of that.
; "But 111 help you," he promised.
-! Jimmv Rabbit thanked him.
, ,. "But,", said Peter Mink. "I can't
do all these things for you for noth
ing, of course. I have too much else
to do, to be wasting my time like
this, without pay."
. "What do you want?" Jimmy Rab-
bit asked him. '. , " .
' "Give me the sled,"- said Peter
link, "and I'll, help you to, get off
. it.: ; j -,. . . .
, ''All ' right, ' Jimmy agreed. -He
.-would even have given1 ' PejWr his
wheelbarrow', too, he was .so anxious
to! be freed from his seat. ' "I think,
though, that: you might, pull me up
the mountain," Jimmy added;. "I
don't , feel like, walking." And that
was quite true, because he Jjad been
so' frightened, when he heard old
Spot barking, that his legs were still
shaking. .
"Well," said Peter Mink, "I'm
pretty particular who rides on my
sled. But I'll pull you up the moun
' tain, 'because I'm going that way
myself, to -slide." '
- And he 1 started off, dragging
Jimmy Rabbit behind him.
. , EMJ0Y ,
-YOUR MEflLD
Uk f '
ttmt ri '
BCrOfcK MKAL
mm
. More Truth
i By JAMES J.
THE AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE
I stood beside the 'phone one day,
And thought up bitter words and strong;
Which I proposed, forthwith, to say -
If Central got my number wrong.
I hoped, in this untoward event, ,
Her ladyship's replies to me
Would be extremely impudent
And wake my powers of repartee.
For when one gets a busy line (
, In answer to a casual call,
Or when by obvious design
He doesn't get a line at all,
It's consolation to invoke
Profanity's explosive art.
' - A few rough words in anger spoke,
X ...... Pour balm upon a troubled heart.
. I got a line I didn't call
V Which nine times out of ten I do), -
And eagerly I thought of all . .
The hard and cruel words I knew.
But wh4n I'd built them, Word on word-' '
In one intense and savage swear,
An awful thought to me occurred : ,
There wasn't any Central there.
An objurgation will suffice.:
- To move a maid to much disquiet, -'
But a mechanical device
Is wholly unaffected by it. ' '
No matter what wild words you fling . - . .
It just resumes its dreary droning,
And so this automatic thing
Takes half the pleasure out of 'phoning!
l J ' T VAX JtK- .
OF COURSE
v "Wilson Rejects Offer of $150,000 for Artcile." New York Sun,
Probably it was Article X. ,'-' . t .
IP WE HAD OUR CHOICE. '
Mrs. Pankhurst is coming over here to suppress bolshevism, but there
are a lot of us who would prefer bolshevism. . . . .'
. . STILL HIGH. '
There; hasn't been any reduction in the Wages of sin.
-" ', ' (Copyright. 1921, By the Bell Syndicate. Inc.)
Romance in Origin
Of Superstitions
By H. IRVING KING.
, Vampires.
" This is an ancient Slavic supersti
tion which spread to many lands,, but
flourished chiefly among peoples who
buried their dead instead of cremat1
tig them. Though much less com
mon than formerly, the vampire su
perstition is by no means extinct. In
I 70 and 1871 there were many trials
of people accused of disturbing dead
oodles in Connection with vampire
istn in Germany. there seemed to be
ah epidemic of the superstition just
then and in comparatively recent
years at least two cases have come
rc light in New England..
A vampire is supposed to be a dead
person who comes forth from his
crave to suck the blood of the living
at night. The superstition is a bit
ha2y as to the form in which the vam
pire comes, whether as a ghost or in
the actual buried body. An exami
nation of the oldest and best authori
ties would seem to indicate a sort of
"astral body." Criminate and sufc
cides turn into vampires, but a rabbit
running 6ver, or a bird flying over,
the grave of an innocent person may
change him into a vampire.
This superstition doubtless origi
nated in the gloomy imagination of
Slavs who'saw their loved ones dying
froln some wasting disease for which
they were unable to account. In a
New England case of vampireism
which 'the writer investigated about
30 years ago the family afflicted were
found to be consumotive. Burnine
the body of the suspected vampire is!
the accepted remedy for the afflic
tion,
Copyright, 1920. by .the McClure News
paper syndicate.)
Parents Problems
What course should be followed i
by his parents when a boy of )
12 is causing undue trouble at
school? .
The parents should have a friend
ly talk with the boy's teacher. If
theTesult of such a conference does
not cause matters to improve, it
might be well to consult i a physi
cian; it may be that the boy is not
well in some particular. '
THE superiority of At
. wood Grapefruit is not
an accident. From the first
planting the Atwood Grape
fruit Co. has sacrificed
everything for QUALITY.
An initial expense of hundreds
of thousands of dollars was in
curred, while everything that
scientific culture atid experience
could suggest was done to pro
duce QUALITY.
Always found in the Atwood
. Wrapper.
TRIMBLE BROTHERS,
Omaha.
Wholesale Distiibutors
ADVERTISEMENT.
666
! a Prescription for Colds,
Fever and LaGrippe. It's the
most speedy remedy we
know, preventing Pneumdnja.
Than Poetry1
MONTAGUS ,
WHY-
Do We Lose Our Balance?
Ask the average person. what en
ables him to stand upright and he
will probably reply. My feet and
the muscles of my legs." ' But he is
wrong as may be seen, by the fact
that a young baby has feet and it
also nas muscles in its legs, .yet it
cannot Stand up. The process of re
maining erect is due, not to any ac
tion ot the lower part of the body,
but to a portion of the .brain
though it is true that this will .not
suffice to support us without the as-sistance-of
our feet and legs.
In addition to this section of the
train proper, there are three small
passages or canals connected with
the ear and filled with a thick heavy
fluid. These canals communicate
directly with the -.brain by means, of
a complicated system of nerves, and
until we learn "the .knack of '"keep
ing our balance,", it is impossible for
us to walk or even stand upright as
it would be for a person to ride a
bicycle or walk a tight rope the first
time-he tried -it. Experience has t
teach us the trick of .so balancing
ourselves that the liquid in the aural
csnals remains at a certain angle
which is the reason that if we whirl
around suddenly this fluid continues
to turn even after, we have stopped
and imparts the feeling of dizziness
which causes us to fall over or "lose
cur balance." ,
Copyright,' U20, by Wheeler Syndicate, Inc.
AMISEM,XT8.
wsm
0 Tonight week
Mate. Wed. A Sat.
The Bohemlane, Inc., Praeent
ReTuaical Comedy of New
York's Latin Qnartier
ORIGINAL GREENWICH VILLAGE
THEATER CO.
Jamea Watta, Ted Lewi., "Jazz Klnf,"
Al Herman, Sylvia Jaeon, Verne Gor
don, Hickey Broe., and the
20 FAMOUS ARTISTS' MODELS
Nlghte, $1.00 to 3.00j Wed. Mat.. BOc
to $2.00; Sat. Mat., $1 to 32.50
NEXTy WEEK. MATS. WED, , SAT
- SEATS NOW ON SALE. .
:x.vs
f Isn't it a Grand Old Name?")
Priceat Wed. Mat, $2 to 50c Evea.
$3 to $1; Sat. Mat., $2 JO to $1.
Matinee Daily, 2ilS; Every Night, 8:15
THE FORD DANCERS;- RAE ELEA
NOR BALL AND BROTHER; CLAUDE
A MARION; Homer Milea A Co.; Dot
ion; Royal Gaacoigneo; Oecar Mirano
Trio; Topica of the Day; Kinograma.
Matinee 15c to 50c; aoaae at 75c; $1
Sat. and Sun. Nlghte 15c to $1.25.
EMPRESS
TWO
SHOWS
IN ONE
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS, Miniature
Mu.lcal Comedy; MARTHA HAMIL
TON CO, Comedr Skit; McKOWN
BRADY, "Word, and Mueic;" SKIP
PER. KENNEDY REEVES, "Campaa
Capera;" 'VINCENT "SONG" MAR
QUISE. Popular Songater. Photoplay
Attraction "Partnera ot Fate,"- tea
luring Laoi.e Lovely. Harold Lloyd
Comedy, "Get Out and Cat Under.'!
OMAHA'S FUN CENTER-
Daily Mat., 15c to TSa
Nltea, 25c to $IM
lack Sl.nr Preuat.
LEW KELLY ft OWN CO SSS
(Mr. Kill, li the neit lailtated I Burlttk.)
Extra MM Fealare Tne Mamlea. 4 JANSLEY8.
tflreet frnie the Mlaallaa Bree. Clreut. Senrk Cart
aa N.ay-fie-Lveky Beaut, Ckerut.
LADIES' DIME MATINEE WEEK DAYS
aat. Hat, a Vaaki Boa ttanlwi Btao Unalf Q4lt
Dog Hill Paragrafs
' fly George Bingham 1
4 Raz Barlow and his dogs. Watch
and Ring, treed a ribbit under .the
postoffice this morning, and in .lift
ing up one corner of the building
they upset a conversation going on
inside.
The Hog Fotd preacher last Sun7
day asked all who had not done
something they oughtn't to during
the week, to stand up. The preacher
was the only one that stood up 'and
he .was already , up when he asked
the. question. ... : . . :
Sidney Hocks left this morning
for somewhere. It was at first be
lieved he was coming instead of go
ing as he had his hat on hind-part
before. M ' "'- .
Jewel; Flower, Color
'Symbols for Toflay
By FRANCES MARSHALL.
rRare indeed ' is today's talismanic
gem,'' the star ruby, which brings to
its wearer great peace and prosper
ity,' thefbappiness ' gained by honest
endeaver, and the respect of his fel
low men. -,Those who wear" the star
ruby need not fear accidents or
plagues,, according . to ' an . ancient
superstition. "7. .-
Another ' deep. ' red stone, the
bloodstone, is today's natal gem,
Indians of the southwest believed
than this stone cut into heart shape
and worn on the ; right hand, would
protect its wearer from diseases of
the Hflood, and another superstition
credits it.' with the power to cheek
hemorrhages.
Pink is todav's Inrkv cotnr.. sini-
thought, it is also indicative :' of
prosperity coming from the' wearer's
efforts. i
The red rose is today's flower, but
should be .Worn rather than used as
a'Mecoration in the home; in the lat
ter connection' it symbolizes un
wise ambition.
Copyright, 1921' by Wheeler Syndicate, toe.
i PHOTOPLAYS.
Wx finnnl i
6f$Pl$l i " SUNSH,NE COMEDY, I ' ':
Irxnnnrvrd nnpriAKir
Wmm DON'T WAIT!
X y y ' AND SEE J
w,... .Tw. m. r. THE SUPREME STORY OF MOTHER LOVE
y prize' announced at every thow. J
mm "MADAME X"
21JSSfwSi33 LAST TIMES TODAY S
MmilS CharJf s Ry a"df - V NOW PLAYING AT THE 4
mtk Dorothy Dalton , J
SS in "Behind the Man" j4f7f?fr . . '.. '
Free' tryoutt on Mute stage tonight , fflSe, ""ft ' J
(ii Will Hold You . "
VTf HOl (11 S P E L LBO U H D .. (n Order to Accommodate the Vatt Crowdt Latt Show Starts 9:30
t j lit WSS n ' - ' ; FREE LIST ENTIRELY SUSPENDED
ftCTSQIk I iJl'AWn-Kj gteEP IT QUIET CLAUP "Sl laPl
SUNDAY, JANUARY 16TH. f H HE Ll OTROP E , H (R R Y ISS j JISHtfSW
All Week , (fftk ZJL poitively j')
show, at ; KvMflfiZz&i OWa,,y'4 s W?S um s ikw) JiDAHCIMGs
rn.3,vv) Bt 5 'SJ wrong Ki'1JA"unta -m
- Thfs story i a youngr automobile salesman who in-' f O feV- ffiyx j IP IS
' herited a 'girls' .boarding school with fifty beautiful J ZfiKtfk !' c'hMa.. I
pupils installs liimself as professor, 'and instead of V " ) s '"Iv 1 HANCF I
teaching them buglogy and mathematics teaches Y r faC!! fotift': .u IT . 7u . I
, . , . , . . ., . - - J al i ' T i T li A( y&X I On the bigseat and beat sprint 3
grace and charm via swimming, fencing, etc., etc. ' S prTT N-'-syffly dance door in the city 1
t- i t nTm fi -JT i I Court Houae Employeea
r . mmam m "irf-B-rfc. V P If rik ! dance tonight
WU-ACE REM) V I -r- ijrrl
yne inarm dfenoor rj t
I'M THE GUY
I'M THE GL'V who won't admit
he's hard of bearing.
Huh? I never get what you say
the first time, although I listen close
ly. Even when you repeat I don't
hear very clearly. So Task you to
say it over. -
It isn't because my hearing is not
good. Far from it, it's your fault
you don't speak distinctly. If you
would take pains to talk slowly and
carefulls', I wouldn't have a bit of
difficulty. But you mumble your
words, and stammer and stutter, so
no one can follow you. I'm not hard
of hearing. That's just your alibi,
when you tell me to do something
and I do -it wrong. You try to say
you gave me the right directions
when you didn't. Sure, always blame
it on the other fellow.
Who's sensitive? Not I. If I
were a little deaf I'd admit it. I
don't need an . ear-trumpet nor any
advice about watching the speaker's
lips.
1 can hear all right and don't ask
for any help from you. See that your
own hearing is all right and don't
mind mine.
Omaha Ranks First
The Omaha recruiting district for
the army ranked highest in the
United States for the month of De
cember in enlistments. The quota
assigned to the Omaha district was
364 men. The, recruiting party .re
cruited 514 men during the month.
PHOTOri.AVS.
NOW PLAYING
OUTOFTHE
SNOWS' V
RALPH INCE
PRODUCTION
A mighty drama of the silent
north, where the only law it that
of tooth and claw.
Common Sense
By J. J. MUNDY.
, Air Castles. .
Self-encouragement of day dream
ing may be one of the barriers to
your success.
It may afford y'cuj pleasure dur
ing, the idle moments to draw men
tal pictures of some good fortune
whkh might befall you one of these
'ays.
riioTorijiYH.
Tugging at Your Heart Strings This
Tremendous Scene From One of
the Greatest Dramas Ever Screened
You Will Set as
Though in a Trance
k . Throughout This
Appeal
"Thia, Meiaieura, it the firat time in my. life
I have come in contact with the bitterneie of
a woman's misery and grief."
. f
"No worda of mine could have such weight in
moving you to pity aa mutt her tean.
"To the Gendarme the taid, 'I killed Laroque
to prevent him from doing en infamout thing
which would bring-ditgrace to aomebody I
love.'"
"Tnit poor creature, who has been beaten
down to the lowest rungt of the .ladder of
phytical and moral mitery loves."
, "Love was the motive that made her a crim
inal. Love, and love alone"
IMAGINE yourself viewing upon the screen, and following the lips of the
speaker, drinking in every precious word of this boy, who is fighting with
his life's blood his first cae in court. Fighting for a woman who has been
driven down, down, and down, and committed crime to shield the boy she
loved and that boy unknowingly was d ef ending
HIS
You think if this should come to
you it would be in such form that
you would not have to work for the
rest of your life no worry.
Your day dreaming may have
reached such a stage that you ac
tually live in a world ot your own
imagination and believe yourself al
most in possession of great riches.
You have a mental picture of a
man who suddenly becomes inter
ested and donates enough to you
to assure you of at least a "small in
come the remainder of your life
1'HOTOrLAYS.
:SLr
"And the will aacrifice her life rather than
let heraelf be kiiown, so that perhapt her pic
ture may remain unttained, untarnished In
the heart of the creature the worehips."
"It it not at her that we thould throw the
itone, but at the man who probably started
her on the road that has brought her to thia."
"It may be a huaband who, withetit pity, sen
tenced .her to a life of wretchednett and tin."
"Some man hat made this woman what you
tee her today, and in the eyes of Eternal Jus
tice he stands by her tide or EVEN LOWER."
"Meatieurt, thit woman is npt morally guilty
and it it your duty to acquit her."
OWN MOTHER!
enough to keep you as well as yo
are today, f f
The more you indulge these illui
sions the less likely it is to happen
to you-the fulfillment of dreams. ;
Silly imagination ruins the mind
for concentrated sensible thought
and the visionary one loses the littl
he or she has. . .
Guard against this state of ininu
which renders constructive woi?
impossible.
CopyrlRht. 19!H. International Feature
tMTVIee. Ino.
rnoTori.AYS.
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1
Tll ' ) q Rl Ba9 Bee Want Ads Are Best Business
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