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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, June 19, 1890, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1890-06-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE DAILY LEADER.
XAll^U.N, (ton i M.'ll.
THCRSDAY EVE.. JUNE 19. 18W.
TKit*a ur
B) mail, 1 yr*r...
Bf m- I, wmk».
Bl
•ytr.
HIITJUJI.
iVIil. HHMlllW. «.
W]i cevrter, r»
TO \|»V*lMHItti4. --'J
Tw* (hMTlMiM* »rH«l tmtmm
lfurni»'iii»z infc»f«««'•»*» c""' I**.**
'Uk#-*» nf tlif tl *»f 4
»,.. »t*sv l»rs-. II III! |»*ir iu«n« i
at i)m)n n i r- "*t i H*-
.1 M' .III., I'rofftMMv it
»ta*e (MffMlinii
Tilt- rv|«H:•«• of Stwih Dslint* will n«*-t to
nlftcttU foCTMillmi In SI I trh*11. 8. fi.. it the
oix-ra
Iiihi*',
W'rdniwlK, tH«- •.Tth day of A«-
insrs, «i o'clock
p.
w» «w «S«
i^itriig te a"inin»iiou raDoM!
Knr I no renre#rnt»tt*«* ts Cof^T«#»
For governor,
Kor
K«w h-Tfi«i ol alaW.
For ir*»»utrr.
F»r
M«IIUM
Kor tuornr v (f'l- '»S
For Hiienl»n)i of public l»»tr»ctloi.
For KJloat* *»1 ^0t»tr taMa.
Til" ttwki coasile* *411 b* nUUtd lu iW wl
1 •!»».'
A ar»r«
Mmw
Brtv.k Ml .......
ft'llfti.' ..........
jBrnif ,l ......
^•Baita
*tO«K«r
a»»«*H ...
OUttOft
]*lsatM. OMBtf
N BSTCBIOAW
1« Hyde
JeranKi ... ....
the remark tiiat "the *"HT*
b«K» dsciami off -v:*^
Waahm^rton dispaU-h. it: When the
Indian appropriation bill was called up
today Representative Hall of Minn*
wota, and Clifford of Sooth Dakota, meni
i)snt of th* coaiuutteo. txk front neatn
and vatch«Hl the bill. There are
V
..y,m
'V
*J
..
4
1H KtnKabniy
i l^tk« ........
L«wr©nc#.
IB
1 4
.M
..»
..
..
V Uncoil
2 McCook ........
*1
McPh«r*Ml.....
A Marshals
15 Meatfc ......
C- ark
i i
*ha.in Hit.....
*'iay
IHj1 ...
iHtaclaM
..
,.
..m
..u
..
l'H
Hennin^WI
Poitt-r
tu bprtu ........
Sanborii
Uplink ....m.«
Slac'e/
•oily
T«rn«r ........
Union

4
-'Ktfmuitii....
4
.. 1
.. ft
..11
a lull
fkiwvta....... 4
W I
By pri«ir of ft* r?Hi ftl XbWteMI,
Mar »,
1IAK!KS A MroY,CI»tm»».
W IUHI
Sr**tme, »«erat»ry
Wilson, th^ b»rw thi#f w(io MOWtly
MOKTisd tram \**n
rmmpturwl,
.j I
A party of ludtaas itUckt^ ten cow
boys near Bepara, N. M.. on the 16th,
slid bum* of th* latter wew hilWd.
Rspr«MmUitiv* (hffonl introdussd
bill by rM]MSt proridi»(f that all rsil
rocds shall use Btsel cross ties aftsr ths
Hut firs
ymrm
Dr. Van VVIwr died at Vasktaa an
ths morning of the 16th. He
WM
the
oklsst physician in the stats, haring bssn
a rssiflent of ankum iwont f-five years.
A Mitchell dispatel, -f tin- 17th says
Hon. Geo. A Johnson of that city has
consented to be a candidate for governor,
haftaf rsoeinssuraaoss ot mpport in
""Aw* "»%rt*an
A iuikum young man purrhased a
tnarria^ lieeose from the clerk trf court,
and the next morniBg returnetl U» the
office and hand*i the instrument back
miiL
MO
pro via ton* for either Minnesota or Houth
Dakota that will not #o through all right.
Washinfrfctm dispatch, 17 There was
only one South Dakota senator present
fBenator Moodj when the silver bill was
tip in the senate, and he voted for silver
every time. Senator Pettigrew waa
paired with Higj?inii of Delaware, who
Would have voted against all the prori
ftumit Senator Mcxxiy stated that F^t
hffrew, pressnt, would have voted for
provider,
The disssttsfaciKin aiuon# fibs
I*»mwrau owing
to
toe
I Vemocratic stat«
refaaal ol the
coo
veoturn to
adopt
a
license plsnk'ic its platlorni has rnlmi"
natml in a movement to call a state con
vention and nominate a candidate for
governor. The call baa been circulated
inviting all who believe that the present
prohibitory law ta a failure and should
be auperoeeded bj local option, to meet
tn tOftventio*) tn fiantfr July 15.
The Black liilis iiii t-eit a-jmewhstf*.
MHnlies s semi circle in shape, with
Hartley peak in the oentsr, and includes
Mi area of about thirty uilss in length
and Ave miles in with. Tin-bearing
iedges are found throughout this bait
which are generally continuous, well d*
fined fissure veins of mie* «hii»t, the
country r»ck being a sthcious slate. The
ore ooenrs in the ftrriii of uaaaiUsrite crya
tels, frrwi a microecopic sise to those
that weigh 100 pounds. Those crygtab
are aiai«stunes found near one wall and
•onetime# disseminated through the
Mm aaatter. The k^iges vary from a
few un hei* to tea feet, or more in width
la Mask*.
Qhwaberlain i^publkm% SA: Jta
Mini. \n in Jail at Pierre on a charge
of horae ateahn^ (Jollins is ons of the
most a«*WB|)liah«id brtmcho ridr.i the
west and mtwHted to visit Chicago dur
ing the world's fair and exhibit hm pro
rtctency as a rider, but it now looka an
though a previous engagement at Sioux
1| Falls will interfere with hi* plana. He
waa chaaeti o%-er T«za*«4 OolorHdo, Mon
-.m-
tonH an
it *nr***
4 Wu«hio«U«i and finally cap
lfi 1
interior of Wy«»«in»M. He
a pnrfeaionai horme thi«f and wm in
i for the c.nuie at l*l«m ui^ Jt
JNAV
W*
hut
OMTIMFFTTD
to
mmm-
It l«.
&%\! "f« MiUsharll Mail, \t Tut MAUISOK D^u.y
f" ,V LJUI»»J*
I*
two luomthti old and ahakea
han^ls with itaeif. I ft. tin- *rncluslou«
a* H»-|f tonirrHtHlatory ••ditorial it
4 ^t»t-iiiiaia«t»c«i3 otclaiina, we my. "it ia
I, jp) fhing to As«d wet! with tiie
atul thero is moosy in it* Per-
TNK MTATH ^•HVAU
'lSTHffr»l Kmerrl*e« 1**
era H«aiic-a«Vfa mmdr-mtm UraiR
•lr ^nt|i«fi «f l4MMU« a»4 Hi*
At last the Cominonooment day has
oooie. At s quarter to ten th* K.
band of thiH city imaeiubled in front of
the op ra home snd opwiital the eier
eteuM of the day with three of their b.«?
selM tionp. Promptly at ten o'clock the
pr^vrHmine for the uxerc nea opeueil in
the opera houee by the K P. btwl'i rso
ditioo of "Athlon© Overture."
The invocation by Dr. Owynne was
able, aiid inapired a hope in the future i
of the Normal aehool and the claae of '90.
The Br«Mkinga Agricultural College
(ilee Club renderetl their first election.
Let Me lream While Life Shall Lin
ge-," in a way that waa pleasing and im
preaaive. The (llee Club oonaiata of
Prof. P. Lapham, MeaarB. Hopkina.
D. Mcluth, Law C. Me Louth, I. l. A1
drich. Grant Houaton, L. K. Wolgemuth
and Mrs. L. Lapham, piaoiat.
Misa F^tina Book's eassv, "The Power
of an Ideal," showed a great amount of
pre
(Miration
..
Miner
MiUttflish* ....
on her part and
WHH
school work, and gave bright hopes
of suooaas in the tutors for tha uiass of
HJ0
The programme closed with mute by
the Brookings (HM d«h aeleotioa "Pk^
On."
The memljers of the claaa ot *9l are
Oie 11 Haasarud, advanced oourse Ed
na Ellen Beck, William Hige] Carr, Eil
gar E. leCou, MH^K'IW E. FHirtiehl, Er
nest C. Kellogg, Joseph Bohaler, eie
mentary oourse.
The hall decoratio»M« wwre boautiful,
the stage being almost hidden by flower
ing plant#. In the center of the stage,
near the
footlights,
in white.
Under the motto, "Labor Oipnia Vin
eit," this ctaas haa achieved success in
ool life. May it aever in sifter life
meet with failure, but ever under its
motto reach crat to the prnidn at it ccnr
preeentel to it.
Following we gfa» gjmopsas of eaMqrs
smI oratiooa, with the sfoapUa— ®f
Meawa. C«rr and Schafer:
THC IMDl'imUAI. AOS.
S. Kellogg: From hiatory w« Imm
that each age ban its peculiar character
istic During the fifteenth century and
onward there were successively the
revival of learning, the reform in re
ltgtoos matters, and the im^Mirtant oon
Hict iietween hlieral and des|Ktio id«4M
of govern roent The development of
thst intellectual, religious and political
freedom was greatly aided by important
inventions or discmeriea. The art of
printing tcave a tremendous impulss to
the intellectual *aod religioua revivain.
A* a reeuit of tha j»rfeotkn of the
mariuer'a conipaaa numerotu geoi raphi
cal disooveries were made. The New
World waa the most important of these,
and the institutions which it soon con
tained exerted a powerful liberalizing
influence upon the affairs ot Kuroj*.
Improvement in the mode of warfare
resulting from the uae of gim |«wder
brought about great changes in the
political world. The people could assert
their rights anl by the
UHM
make them good. Judging frmn |ast
ages wa may expect our age to have pe
culiar eharacteristu*, and sach is the
case. The people of to-day are wholly
Kven up to industry. They are so, not
a quiet, humble way in smalt com
munity relation, but in a grand, general
and universal way. From this character
istic it is called the industrial age.
This condition of industry has been
made possible by the greatest inventions
that have marked human progress. By
telegraph tinea, railways, and steamships
cheap and rapid communication and
transportation hRveliecome world wide,
and haw iwn followed by a martveious
increase in industry. 16 every depart
ment hand lidior ha*, given pl»tx» to ste.tui
power which utcroasu* the |,r-*duct from
-Ay j^--
received
with unstinted applause by the audience.
"A Purpoee the Condition of Hu(xvw«"
was the title of an oration by William
Higel Carr. The oration, "Canada and
the United States," by Edward EL Ie
Cou, showed thst Mr. De(u haa made
a study of the feelings snd conditions
existing between the United Btales and
Canada.
Mr. Htott rendered his baritone solo,
"Dear Heart," with bis ttsaal individual
itv and j»ower.
The essay, "The Teachers' Influence
On Character," waa a psychological
atudy, but was couched in such simple
terms that it was fully appreciated by
the audienos.
"Gaily Chant the Bummer Birds," sc
prano solo by Mrs. Dempster, needs no
comment, as this lady's powers as a solo
ist are widely known.
Mr. E. C. Kellog« gave the audience a.
bird's-eye view of the advancement in all
agee and times the advancement of art,
literature, music, sculpture and {taint
ing, down to our own tiaie, which he
called the "Industrial Age
Mr. Joseph Schafer reviewed the
Hcenee of "Thermopylae" and ita brave
defense by the three hundred Spartan
heroes against the Persiaua, and from
that let! on to our uWn conquests in life,
bringing out the idea that although we
might not accomplish our ends we may
yet t» heroes in dswetkm to our prtnei
pies.
Danube," by the Brookings CHee C3al,
was excelIsnt.
In presenting the diplomas Gen.
Beadle made a very touching address,
speaking of the success of the class in
its
ten to iH») lb«Uraad foki. gxe.t
the world's business th«*. it rwjmrett the
lightning for
IH
TKACHKR'm
outward
of muskets
I H1 N'
cars and locomot.vi i«,l n txirrespond
injrly great number ot steamer* for
bnr«len bearers, and mukt* thia age
HU
premely the industrial age. In the df
vekpment of this wonderfal industrial
ac tivity, we notice that our own eountr
fuis exerted a mighty luttuenne, so bt
hind this oonditkm of iudusury and
back of the inventions that m-ule it j*»*
sible, let
reoogniase and ad mire the
triumphant power of fro© institutiona
THK rowitK or
ARID*AI„
Sdna Book: IdeiU are the world's
masters. I hey nre uiaterialiml In hu
man life, and if the ideal is pure and
noble, the life'will surely becomo better.
Tin- itea! changes only with the agew
and in its change closes an epoch in the
history of ft nation. Kgypt's ideal was
embodied in her religious belief and
caused the life of the people t» follow
in the same cbunnels by oentunos. The
ideal gave to Athens everything that
was beautiful. It produced a peerless
race of writers, statesmen and orators,
Iioets, artists and sculptor*. Sparta's
ideal took all beauty and tenderness
from life and in their plaoe put dry eyes,
utony hearts and iron frames It gave
Leonida* and his three hundred Spar
tans and erected their monument bear
ing this inscription: "Stranger, tell it
at Sparta that we lie her© in oiedienee
to our country's command." The ideal
gave Rome almost the whole of the civi
lized world. It gave triumphal pro
cessions magniflcient with gilded chariots
for the conqueror, splendor for the rich
itud noble, but it tilled the atroot* with
funerals, leaving cold hwrth-«t-oQes and
fatherleeK children. But there came a
change. The ideal died. For centuries
there was no religion, learning or law.
But as the idea! of Ivotue died, a new
ideal wan born Bethlehem of Judea.
It grew rapidly in strength and great
ness. Its voice spoke to all classes and
all nations. Around this new ideal are
grouped our perest thoughts and bright
est airna. For ages it haa shaped the
events of history. It
jfivm
form and
character to ideas and instinlions. It
is ever attended by program. It. is fol
lowed everywhere by schools und print
ing presides. It places over all the home
in lU purity and aacredneoi that govern
ment a unit out of wlitcb may be built,
the "Brttherhood of Mai), the Feder
ation of the World."
THK
I.^^LLItWai & CH.VBACrriCK.
Maggie Fairfield: By
IBIRI
of author
ity, it is agreod that eduoation, which
does not develop the whole man, is in
complete. UlOUttt-U IV k
seldom the intellectual natitre is neglect
ed, often the physicftl is ignored, and
too frequently the moral is left to take
care of itself. The great importance of
thinking about the ifiuence we are ex
erting in the school room During
school life pupils are planting tite genus
of habitn that will decide their future.
The teacher has the powpr to control
these habits, and thus greatly influence
character. The two channels through
which we exert influence are the con
scious and unconscious. Under con
scious influence, a direct and conscious
effort should be made to teach pupils to
have some noble purpose in life. If each
pupil will take some lme of work for
which he is best adapted, and follow it
patiently and earnestly, we will And no
men and women who shift from place to
plaoe and want "soft jobs," Train pu
pils to believe their calling in life, how
ever humble, ia noble if they discharge
of the face ia the
expression
of feeling. Pupils
are good judges and are always influeuc
ed by teacher's feelings. A third factor
of the unconscious iuttueaoe is temper.
It is that part of our baing which is not
easily controlled, but when mastered ia
one bf the ln«t traits a teftoher can pos
seen. Neither channel of influence will
prove beuelk:iai unless it has had special
direction. In the cun»ciooa we must lie
thoroughly in earnest, and make our
words a pert of ourselves if we expect to
help others.
In
regard to unconscious
influence we should
HO
watch and train
ourselves that when our habits §m im
itated aud built into the lives of our
pupils,
we will
make mtrn and women
who are an honor to themselves, tfceif
eauntry and their rod,
akaoa a5o
THE
imo sr*im
Edward E [email protected] Hinee the earli
eat settlement, (brandssnd the United!
8tat*s« have lieen in close relations of
friendship or hostility. It was a greet
di«ipj*nrstiirt»nt to tl Tllirteeti Colotijtes
that Canada, a British provm** lik»i
thenift^dve*. on 'a*w»nr:f of the grsnt pre
jxwderancc of ite Fr«-isch popillat ton. did
not join thsoi in tboir war lux
rm ^-^psR?yt.
y?-
*V,
deucc. The growth uf iiit-.sk: twu amgh
lrring countries in population and
wealth has been marrsloiw yet the
growth of Canada, though not an notice
able, haa been greater proportionally
than that of the United States. The
people of Canada bare gradually gained
control of their government, till at pree
ent they are practically a free nation,
tfoveruod by their own representatives
in the House of Commons. Of late the
desire for closer trade relations between
the two countries has ^od to the stormy
agitation of Commercial Union by many
eminent men on both aides. Undoubt
edly the effect of such a measure would
be a vast increase %f trade letween the
two people®, K'reiitly benefiting both
and when the people once come to real
ise the mutual benefit* derived from
such trade relations they would never
consent to have them broken up. Be
yond \muierciai Union ihere is but one
step, yet one of such extreme import
ance that it demands the most careful
discussion political union. Many
Canadians have been inspired by the
freedom they now enjoy with a strong
hope of becoming, in the near future, an
indopeudent natioi. For the present
their still strong loyalty to the mother
country and the strong social influence
of the Governor-General and his friends
incline them, to remain as they are.
Some Americans alao oppose the move
ment, believing that Canadian agricul
tural products would be brought into
injurious competition with those of the
American farmer. However, a close
look at the other side of the question
reveal* many causes tending to promote
union. The English speaking popula
tion of Canada are entirely unable to
assimilate the large French population
on account of the tenacity with which
they hold to their own laws, language
and customs, while under our form of
government they would tteeeeaarily
adopt our laws and language. Union
would settle all disputed questions and
by the abolition of the vexatous custom
houses would cause trade to take its
natural oourse. Canadian agricultural
lroducta would be exchanged for Ameri
can manufactures, and American capital
would be largely used to develop Cana
da's boundless wealth of minerals, for
ests and fisheries, thus ushering in an
era of great industrial prosperity These
facts and the great similarity of the two
peoples in race, customs, language and
love of liberty seem to point to union
with the United States as the destiny of
Canada. May we not hope that when
all old animosities have died away these
two neighboring people* so similar in
.—r--+~ «nlt* hv mutual
attraction, thus forming the grandest
nation of free
MM*
tory.
Tfcftif duttos fnithfnHy. Itr »hat tbe yhyjiun 1 social- envinomonts.
man has, but what he is that muki* the
ma«i. Whaius all wuik faithfi.ilv
and thoroughly performed. The value
of thw habit is inestimable. Impress
pupils with the importance of discrimi
nations in the choice of eompamonr.
Oar character depends groatly on our
social relations. The conscious effort is
very important, but the deepest and
most powerful impressions are made on
minds independent of tqjokeu or written
words. The most mi portent influences
is the unconscious our. One of the
most important factors of unconscious
influence—and the one so often neglect
ed by the teacher- ia tnsnnera. The
teacher must by hia mana»rs either pro
duce harmony or discord The deciit on
is in his own power. Another factor is
the feco, one of the indices God has
given to determine the true from the
false. The
expression
i
e«rer Inowa t» his­
N
CACHES OF OPfWlOJf.
0. H. Haasarud: The inteUeetasl
endowment of man is the predominant
characteristic that entitles him to power
in the animate world, and enables him to
utilize the surrounding force. It has
raised him from the lowest stages of
barbarism to the present condition of
civilization. It is oniy natural that
such rt power should be highly
appreciated by men and even exalted
beyond its proper sphere. History teems
example* of those who have thus exalted
with their reason.making it supreme, per
se niting those entertaining oifTerent
ideas. The beliefs of a person mostly agree
with his opinions, and are produceed by
them. Opinions are produced by different
causes the first of these is observation.
Tli© action of observation is produced by
These manifestations are too numerous
to be grR«p«H) lJ the perrnpti ve jKiwer.
A jierson so«in haa
IUH
Memory ia a seeond etameot ia the
formation of beliefs. Ail kinds of ex
periences are not remembered with the
mine degree of exactness, due commonly
to the accustomed use of memory. A
strong fceliug will also effect memory,
causing experiences of one kind to be re
called easier than others. Even though
feeling lie weak it will produce its effect
u|K»n tinmi *ry and a parson"* opinio ns,
Feelings often modify opinio by their
effect upon a persou'a estimate of him
self in that it makes htm unwilling to
admit his errors. When opinions have
been formed much study is directed
towards sustaining them instead of a
search for truth. This is detrimental to
impartialltty and the person often be
oomen narrow in hi« views and intolerant
to others. But man is now learning
better to understand the true realm of
opinions, to view them as induces of ic
dividual character. More liberalty Is
shown, and greater toleration will dis
place persecution for opinion's sake.
rillL KftUIXKKtt.
W. R. 8MYTHE,
Civil Engineer I Surveyor1
MADISON. NO! TH DAKOTA.
rtsmt
441 A HI,KM #I. 4TS?
Conifacior and iuilUBr.
*s£?w, ^l^'TJT'^' -V5-?^r ^il'
-r vl—i .,
-*rf .'• .r
v-,x--J.,
,'Y
y "V, »-7fjfc£"
& I:
ItHl
RAVEN GLOSS
SHOE DRi:*WI!Vs
l*o»t(fv«lf fontalua oil. fleftens an#
urrarrvp* Iratbrr. Is ffonomlrai Mak«a
Iwk knew ftt.U natarwl,
V&rm.H. ht.nl
1
o.
Gitizci|S
Will rsmit mowey to ray of the Old World, sad
Few who bftvmot wtro
FKAHK SMITH.
ohaervation direct
ed in a certain direction and the mental
development will proceed in the same
direction. He will observe only what
lies in his line and his views will become
one sided. This results in special modi
fication of the mind, anil the individual
sees everything as through a colored
glass which gives its own hue to every
thing.
Nktl, Oils
D.
0. S JONES
,i
10 per cent. Discount Sale
FOR-:-CASH.
ANOTHER WEEK!
sits
S0RRE8PUNDENTS.
Philadelphia iii&nce Co., Philsdelphiis Fetd^
National Batik of Illinois. (Miicu^o, 111.
Sioux Falls National Hank, Sioux Falln,
-'"Mi
xn
M*e.
illaroufit "tale
go«Kl thing la«» week, that we have de
citled to continue it «»ne more week.
N'ow is your time to take advantage of
cheap pri*»i« in our dry gooiB de
merit and shoe
gike notioe, ovr
lis week.
lAKKHU.CttM'Kt TIOXa, Mt.
W. F. BMITH. President. M, W. PALY, Ylee-PreslAst. J. 4. TBOW, OsAtsr
n
v
Capital IStf.OOV. Surplus
MADISON DAKOTA
i jiml Banking Business liansacisil.
principal European ports on any of the lexUng linse
•SB
MU
H»y and Municipal tk«nds bought and sold.
Collection* made and pioaiyilf mMed.
OOBRE8PONDENT8:
First National Bank, Chicago. Chase Katkmel Buk, Rev Yec^
Minnehaha National Beak, Bioux Falls.
CHA8. B. KENNEDY, Pre*
WM. F. KENNEDV, Bec'yATlwm.
8. I).
fr-LA*MBI, MIIIBTM
Fancy Flannel Shirts
tliem have
snj i«Nnt tif
a NE0LI0EE FLANNEL SHIRT
in soiBiiier time. And fuahiou, too, haa deerHd that tbcf
the proj^r cajier, don't you know? We have by all odtls tile largfft
and liest assorted stock of the^e goods to be found in this city.
trolxaa. XDxiscoll-
SBtUS AlKli
HOTBL.
COMMERCIAL' HOUSE
24^L
•111,1.1 ARl
MAIL
ijTOHN HTJSS, Proprietor
•AKRRI, VEXRRCTIEMRKY.
STU BAKERY
the
JRWRLiY.
& COOK*
Driiggists and Jewelers
UEAOgCAimtKS
and Wall Paper Fine Gold and Stiver
Jewelry.
Watch and Clock IW|»air»ng
and niechanicaliy executed.
•-PFIKTKK A 8WEENRY.
Bakers, Fruiterers and Confectioners.
linkers
of
fCE CHE AM
the Celebrated CBKAM BR HAD.
aervetl
day or evening.
Ji
.!•*
department, K\ervlK»tJy
DlMsount Sele o«tjr kate
M. J. McGillimy & Co.
E. CLAPP, Vice Vm,
J. & JONEK, Ass't Bec'y A Trees.
Northwestern Loan and Banking Co.
Madison, South Dakota.
A GENERAL IIAKKINO BUSINESS TR ANSACTED.
Makes a specialty of firat niortgugo and real loMM. Bay
muiiinjml, tajnutj juid school londs and other
'HI
PHUR
Ml
[X|iii
lot
RBK"
»part
Mm CI
visit to
iurlingto
uri
About
jhool ati
utgoing 1
Bt parts i
Mrs. It
aving lie
ones duri
fftby the
tttend the
km sesi
frtm
at
Steemhueilr
Buy yoe
wmlott llxii
in
quit?
ONE DOLLAR PER DA
MARQUART, PBOP&IBTOB
I4.AK» Kti.
oi" fiiiari mi,'....
mm.
H. KILROY, Proprietor.
Wll AS
Luiitli €ouliter.
Icc ('rmiii Pariili
ConfBelio^ir
(t ISObllK.
Ftiwt door
w«et
ml PoHtisrti''* '.
GASOLINE ill KEROSENE.
Oil and GASOLl
H. N.
..-1*02*1* e,
lib
I.Xd
•oin N
end tl
,'rand
ie first
.ilivray
lome
client rs]
broail.
l»r Hull I
of Hoe to-i
ruhcate tha
lie Httmple*
heat, winU
wheat is
»i»t* straw i
Hull is na
beautiful gr
OW. -t5oo*
wh
Iter
[Hlt
Hu
pfOBtpily
UNION BLOCK, BGAN AVI® UHlfeath fr,H«
HAisrwY r»*fWTfo*i5rr, t».
The sed t»
Van loren,
day, June 1(3
er -only chil
VanI)ore»,fj
an aocomplti
graduate of
claan of
with particn
Bien'-ement
i tfie was tend
citizens will
With which i
evening of tl
the class trf 1
a life of hi
mm. It is
u§ to be calU
citi/.cn« this
happiness in
and eepeciall
that only a I
deceased par
full of life at
oelianc* won
bo«iy present
will go out fr
of Madieon t*
'-leiui*.
Wl*dc
Retai
There was
•doiidiir he
•Sious Falls
freshly tuarri
ut) dt
his cl
*«wne young 1
eahly mai
Ave passed
»eir wturn
didn't. Wh«

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