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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, June 28, 1893, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1893-06-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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AMERICAN HISTORY.
THE COMING CONVENTION OF ITS
LEADING EXPONENTS.
l—rflnriT 'Tiit i rr it In th« Stndy of Jfl»tory
la American Schools and College* anil
Improved Methods «sf Teaching—Th»* I n
of Profruor White.
Anthors and readers alike look
for the reports cf the July convention® I
at Chicago, whither writers, librarians,
philologists ami dabblers in folklore ar»
now taking their course fr^ra all part
of the civilized world. Naturally Amer
icans will be moat numerous, and oi
gatherings which may be called exclu
sively Aiiierican by far the most impor
tant and interesting will be the ninth
annual meeting of the American Histor
ical association.
No other organization has gained in
general interest more rapidly than this
has in its nine years of existence, and lit
tle wonder, as its membership comprises
rat men as Dr. Andrew D. White, for
merly of Cornell James B. Angell oi
Michigan university, Justin Winsor.
Charles K. Adams, Hon. George Bonri
not, Hon. John Jay and many otherf
scarcely inferior in reputation, the total
making nearly 701) of the most thorough
scholars and earnest searchers aftei
truth in the world. And of all thest
Dr. White is probably entitled to tht
first honor for having led the way in
making history a science in American
colleges.
DSL JAMKS B. ANGELL.
At the sixth annual meeting of the as
sociation, held in Washington city in
1880, President Charles K. Adams of
Cornell rendered a high compliment to
his predecessor by a simple statement of
the admitted facts that down to 1857 the
study of history in colleges was no more
than a dry and formal textbook affair
and that in 20 years thereafter it took
high rank, among the independent
courses.
In October, 1857. the students at Awn
Arl or, Mich., were surprised and not a
little amused to see seated among the
professors a very young and fair gentle
nan of strikingly modest mien whom
one of them had just addressed on the
campus with the current satirical ques
tions: "Going to enter freshman, eh:
Classical? Well, look out for old Bois*
(Greek professor)! He's your toughest
pill."
It was the new professor of history and
literature, Andrew Dickson White, whc
had been graduated from Yale in 1853,
had passed three years in Europe, first at
Paris and JJerlin as a student, and then
at St. Petersburg as an attache of the
American legation, and had then devot
ed a year at Yale to historical studies.
He was even then but 25 years old and
so very youthful looking that the sopho
more who "chuffed"' him declared that
he took him to be "17 or thereabouts.'
In five years he had made history the
favorite study in the University of Michi
gan.
.About 1870 all the colleges seemed
moved with a desire to raise history to a
higher rank in their curricula, and in
1881 Cornell for the first time gave the
entire service of one professor to that
subject, Professor Mbses Coit Tyler being
the man. At Cambridge seven profess
ors and teachers are now employed, and
eighteen courses are offered at Yale two
or three professors are engaged in this
work and at Cornell four. At Johns
Hopkins a different system was adopted,
the plan being to encourage independent
work. Finally, in 1884 the present as
sociation was organized, and its progress
has been phenomenally rapid.
Dr. James Burrill Angell, president of
the association, also president of Michi
gan university, was born in Scituate,
R. I., Jan. 7, 1827, and was graduated
from Brown university in 1850. Since
that date he has divided his time almost
equally between university work and the
life of a literary man and a diplomatist.
DE. JUSTIN WlJfWOfc.
Dr. Justin Winsor, a former president,
ofthe association, has survived the rather
savage attacks made on him for denying
originality of design to Cdlumhus and 1
has proved to his critics that they have
no small mau to deal with. He is among
the most learned of bibliographers and
as editor of a "Narrative and Critical
History of America'' has a high rank
ami 'Ug historians. The eminent George
Bancroft was also president of the asao
-XUUXiOSL J. TT TU- a
!,
TT
m"
"THE CHINESE MUST GO."
Dml« KfWDfj- Started the Wwrry Whletl
Is Echoed Throughout the Land.
Denis Kearney hits been alternately
langhed at and
abused, but he is
a success. In 1873
he began to rouse
the workingmen
of San Francisco
with vituperative
harangues on his
great warcry,
^"The Chinese
V must go." The
city needed no
conversion. The
state was soon
converted, all the
far west follow-
DEKTS XJlAfCflST.
•d, and now the nation, through its su
preme legislature, says "the Chinese
must go."
Dennis Kearney was born in Oakmont,
County Cork, Ireland, went to sea when
a small boy, reached New York as a
sailor at the ago of 11, and at 19 was cap
tain of a sailing vessel. Evidently such
a man had a good deal in him. His edu
cation was such as he could acquire
while at sea, his strong point being a
marvelous command of vituperative
rhetoric. His ideas of English may be
judged from his favorite expression,
"lecherous bondholders." He pronounced
it "leecherons" and took it to mean hay
ing the nature of a leech.
In 1877 ho led in organizing the Work
ingmen's party, which carried the state a
year or two later and embodied its views
in that peculiar organic law familiarly
known as the "Denis Kearney consti
tution." He is far from attractive in
personal appearance and has very little
Of what is called magnetism, but he
talks to plain people in a way they un
derstand, not always sparing profanity.
In July, 1878, he opened in Boston his
famous eastern campaign. After mak
ing many addresses in various cities he
returned to San Francisco and once
more became "the agitator of the sand
lots.1'
But his second campaign was an ap
parent failure, and in 1880 the working
men deposed liirn from the presidency
of their organization. In 1883 he went
to New York, but the T^orkingmen voted
against having him speak for them. It
was in 1868 that he arrived in San Fran
cisco as captain of a sailing vessel and
soon after became a drayman, and in
1885 it was reported that he was again a
drayman and silent in politics. But in
1888 he was in Washington working for
the passage of the Chinese exclusion bill,
and now it appears that he is again a
power in San Francisco. Be his faults
as many and as great as is charged, still
he must be credited or charged with giv
ing the initial impulse to the movement
which has resulted in excluding the Chi
nese.
HE THREATENS TO BOOK Uft.
Prince Roland Honaparte Will Write
About Hits Experiences In America.
Prince Roland Lucien Pierre Napoleon
Bonaparte, after declaring himself de
lighted with his tour in America, has re
turned to France with the fell purpose
of writing a book about us and our coun-
PRINCE ROLAND BONAPARTE.
try. The prince is a grandson of the
Lucien who was a brother of the great
Napoleon and a son of that Pierre Bona
parte who shot Victor Noir. Prince
Peter, as that Pierre was called by Amer
icans in Paris, was the black sheep of
the Bonaparte family and was the only
one of them forbidden access to the Tuil
eries by his cousin, Louis Napoleon.
Prince Peter lived many years with a
modiste who formerly kept a shop in
Bond street, London, and their two
children, Roland and Jeanne, were born
some years before their parents con
cluded to marry. After the death of the
prince, his widow, known as Princess
Peter, lived in poverty till, she suc
ceeded in manuring her son Roland to
Mile. Blanc, daughter of the proprietor
ot the gaming tables at Monte Carlo.
She died a few years ago, and Prince
Roland is rich.
He is only a prince by title, however,
as the Bonapartes hold no rank in
France. He was even compelled -to re
sign his lieutenant's commission in the
army, but did not have to leave France,
as many other princelings did. He is a
handsome and stalwart man, six inches
taller than his great-uncle, the famous
Coreican, and made a favorable impres
sion on all he met in America. He
crossed the continent, went up to Brit
ish Columbia and returned by way of
Winnipeg and Chicago.
In New York and Chicago alike Prince
Roland took a deep interest in social
studies. He read a very interesting pa
per before the international congress of
anthropology on Surinam and made a,
short address on the Laps, among whom
he had traveled two months. He also
presented to the American Academy of
Anthropology copies of hit bocks to the
number of five. He has no political as
piration* whatever and is wholly de
voted to science.
Saauicr Cotnfort For Lacy Pioyia.
The big piazza rocking chair comes
this7 season with a patent fan attach
ment. While vou rock the fan sways.
N/
'.V
'.. 'V.'
v
Fifty Thousand For Injarfea.
ffiw YORK. June 28.—The NewYoilt
Central Rail rand company will pay
Mr*. H. R. Baldwin000"for personal
injuries sustained in as accident on
Christmas eve, 1801. Mrs. Baldwin
was crushed by heavy timbers and
scalded by steam from the engine. Her
scalp came off, her eyelids were burned
away and her eyeballs were so injured
that they were removed, toth ears were
gone and the right arm and nearly all
of the left had to be amputated. Mrs.
Baldwin brought suit for $250,000
damages, and this settlement it ^e
result
Needed a Hope and a leader.
ST. LOUIS, June 28.—Police Offioer
Christopher J. Verdon narrowly «s
caped lynching by a crowd of citizens
who were horrified and incensed at his
brutal treatment of Huj?h McGuire,
whom he had arrested after an argu
ment about religion. Verdon was in
full uniform and crazy drunk. He be
came involved in dispute with Mc
Guire in a saloon, and finally knocked
the latter down, kicked and clubbed
him into insensibility. All that was
necessary was a leader and a rope, but
before these could be secured, Verdon
and his victim werelanded in the pytyce
station.
Maxtinnm A. O. IT. \Y. Assessments
TORONTO. 0:it..Juiie'.'S.—Alter a long
debate the supreme lolgd of A. O. U.W.
adopted a maxim 11 rate of assessment
for various ju- is.licrions for the next
three years. Pennsylvania, Ohio, Ken
tucky, NiW York. I'#wa. Indiana,Texas
and the suj reiu lo.ljje are placed in a
group at £30. The other jurisdictions
average $19.
Killed by n Boy.
MEDFORD. Wis.. June 2&—Joseph
sharon, a Frenchman, while drunk laid
down a bum belonging to A. Schwab
in the town of Greenwood and was shot
and killed by Schwab's son, August.
The boy called to h:m twice and getting
no answer commenced shooting, not
knowing who he was firing at.
An Alleged Confession.
WAUPACA, Wis., June 28.—A sensa
tion was produced here when it was
rumored that Bill Hanscomb
signed a confession telling about the
Mead murder. Whether the deposition
went into the details of the murder or
only of his ride to lola with Prior is
not known.
World's Fair Hotel Failofffe.
CHICAGO, June 2S,. —The Columbian
Excursion company, which, holds a
lease on three of the world's fair hotel-',
has made an assignment in favor u£
Meviile C. Eames. The hotels are the
Everett, 200 rooms the Costello, 223
rooms, and. the Boston, 200 rooms.
Killed by a Ball.
WEST UNION, O., Jane 28.—Ex-Be
corder James Stephenson died in in
tense agony from the effects of the ter
rible injuries received troro an aaarj
bulL
ATTORNEY)*.
6w. K. Jfmrmer. C. J. Fmrmtr
FARMER & FARMER,
ATTORNEYS COUNSELORS AT LAW
Office over J. J. Fitzgerald's stnre.
HEAT MAKKGTN.
Get th»- tx-st meat at
J. I. MEPLER'S
Heat Market,
Corner Egan avenue and
Center Street.
Convenient to the Motor
Depot.
CURED MEATS'
for summer use a specialty
CAMPERS SUPPLIED
iKWfcLKV.
AND
Silverware
LT
GEO. COOK'S
Watches and Clocks of every de
scription.
Repairing a Speciilty.
In Wood's drug store.
«ROCI:KIKN.
FRANK BALDWIN
HAS
.Opened up a general supply o
FRESH GR0CERIF8
DRIED FRUITS
CANNED GOODS etc
ill C. E. Kelley's old stand, corner
west of the Postoffice, and will
deliver to all parts of
GIVE HIM A CALL,
LOST MANHOOD Kiwusas
curirt by IWBAJPO. th*- (treat Hindifumed*. Sold
1 IT I MILEJ—RMJI I I nm
Orient*) IMInl l'»., i* Iljatoo o flae*,
for Constipation
Ayer's Pills
For Dyspepsia
Ayer's Pills
For Biliousness
Ayer's Pills
For
Sldk Headache
Ayer's Pills
For Liver Complaint
Ayer's Pills
For
Jaundice
Ayer's Pills
For Loss of Appetite
Ayer's Pills
For Rheumatism
Ayer's Pills
For Colds
Ayer's Pills
For Fevers
Ayer's Pills
PWgmSvd l»J Tr. .1. C. AyerfcCo., Lowell, Mul,
Sold by all l)ruKK«U
gvery Dose Effective
1HRKCHA1T TAIliOK.
Splendid Goods,
bright, new and the
latest patterns.
Thomas
the
A large line |_ Excellent work
to [hp men andsatisfac
select from. 1||U tion guaranteed.
Come in and pee the
goods and make your
selections.
Tailor.
KKMTAl'KAXT.
Star Restaurant
AND
LUNCH ROOM.
A full supply of
goods
fresh
Call and see the Lounging Chairs
which we are giving to our cash cus
tomers.
nm
HOOT COKPOCXD,taM«O
s
Adore**
FUTCE8FT.
t'OSTBACTOR.
PHIL. THOMAS
Contractor aa® Builder,
Plans and Specifications
furnished whin Required.
MADISON HOUSE.
The Pioneer Hotel of the city,
If. CASEY,
Proprietor.
Rooms newly furnished
for the summer season.
The wants and comforts of guests
carefully studied.
COMPOUND.
A recent discovery by an old
physician. SttoceM^VOy used
HurtUhi]/ by thovtand* of La
'(tel. Is the only perfectly safe
and Tellable medicine discov
ered. B«ware of unprincipled
druggist# who
medlclaee In place of this. Ask (or
the
baked
BOOTH AX1 MHO EM.
BUY YOUR
Boots and Shoes
OF
JAS. BARRETT,
CHOICE
CRYSTAL
A-
Beheaded a Boy.
WINONA, iflln.. June T'9.— Ehrich
Weilandt, a 5-year-old boy had his head
and one arm cut off by a switched car,
while playing on the railroad track.
ICE.
IOK.
Kile your orders for the season of
1893 with
1 FISHER
VLITCKOrTH.
Everybody
COOK'Stnfer{prOTTOHCoffer
enftcNdtM, or Inclose land
9 cents In poetasre tn letter, and we will send, staled,
return malL Fall sealed particulars in plain
envelope,
to
ladle* only, 8
Addres*
No. 3 P*"vjauii.
Hr8ol4 ta Mauison by F. C. Smith,
Wc. xi, l(. Woods k Co., O. J, Tweed and
u gg 1
e v e ry w
11 e ro.
C. H. WOOD,
—I/EALKR lit—
USflGSand MECICINES
mt STATIONERY,
Plusli O'Mi.ls, AHiu'o-.. Pine Toilet tioap
Brushes, Combs. Toys, Fancy Goods,
ftljnts.OiK Varnish*. CslsomiD*
v Wall Paper, and a full line of
Patent Medicines.
CHOICE PfcRFUMfcrtlES.
!'rew*ri ptin»« wurefnily »-*MnroncfVJ Any
i*r niirht.
AVSNU* *Atr*OH
V
.. Y
k V .r
THK
OF SOUTH DAKOTA.
MADISON
At LAKE MADISON, three and one-half miles southeast
of the city. Connected by Motor line
A Large Number of State
Meetings are held at,the
Chautauqua Grounds every
summer.
MADISON
,,pm ^r/
—18 LIGHTED BY—
ELECTRICITY.
The Streets Illuminated by 12 Arc Lights
The Most Complete Plant in the State.
State Chautauqua
ASSEMBLY GROUNDS
The Lake provided with
the Steamer "City of Mad
ison,'1 capable of carrying
150 persons.
A Beautiful Sheet of Water,- Eight
Miles Long and Two Miles Wide.
Two and one-half miles west of the city
surrounded by beautiful groves
of natural timber.
MADISON
lisA.
The seat of the State Normal School. Value of Normal
•-buildings, $55,000. The Normal School is now in ses
sion, with over 260 student* from various parts of the
state in attendance.
Excellent City Schools. New Central School buili*
ing recently completed at a cost of $20,000.,
Is the home of Nine Churches!
Excellent Society. Stone and
-Brick Business Buildings
It* THE'
Freight and Passenger Division of
the S. M. Div. of the C., M. & St
P. R'y running north and west.
Fine Brick 10-Stfll Round Ho»$e.
MADISON
Is a great O-rain Market. Seven El
evators, Flat House and Roller
MUL
Lake County has NEVER Experienced
a
Crop Failure.
CITY PROPERTY
And FARM LANDS can be purchased at reasonable
prices. HOMESEEKES are cordially invited to settle
in this community.
For additional particulars concerning the resources of
this section, prices of City Property, Farm Lands, etc., etc.,
address
GHAS. B. KENNEDY,
V:-'T
Madison, South Dakota.
I

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