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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 28, 1893, Image 4

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1893-11-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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TO THE PROFESSOR.
Your path an 1 mine lie wide apart!
For you, the things of head ami heart*
The level of that loftier plane.
Where sonl draws near its source agalN
For me, the sordid street and mart.
Tour choice has found "that better part*4*
And, Martha-like, 1 feel the smart.
And oft contrast, with secret pain.
iigii
Your path and iuinet
Bat yet two vessels may depart
On different tacks, yet by one chart
Direct their course across the main.
To some far pert. and so these twain
May ilnish closer than they start.
Your path and mine!
—C. B. Going in Summer FallMfc
DICK PROPOSES.
•*Lo, Mag."
"That you, Dick?"
"Aye. it'a me, Maggie—hooore ye?*'
"Pixi brawly," said Mag, a I ttleMU
dly.
"It's a fine nicht."
"Aye, there's naething wrong *1*
the nicht.''
"Fine nicht for a walk, Maggie.**
"If that's (tae, boo dae ye no gne «B
tak' ver walk?" paid Mag, pouting.
Dick looked cautiously into Mag's
eyes and stroked his chin. "I heard ye
were walkin wi' Bob Spaldin," he said
warilv.
••Did ye, tho'?"
"An that you an him wor* ttve mak'
amatcho't."
"Did ye, tho'?"
"1s no true, Maggie?"
"Speer nae questions, Dick, an 1*11
tell ye nae lees."
Dick stroked his chin again, looked
up and down the road and changed the
leg on which he had been resting.
"If it's no true, Maggie," he said,v
"I'll stop the stories that are gain the
roonds."
"I'm much obleeged tae ye, Dick
Lang," aaid Mag, giving her head a
i/naw
"It'll he nae bather at i'. Ye ken
me better than that, Maggie.**
"Dae I tho'? And what aboot yer
set, vha kens mare aboot me than ken
I myself
V"
"An ye say it's no true—noo dinna
thra\v me, Maggie, but juist up an oot
wi' the truth, an I—I"
Mag was staring at him, and Dick's
tongue clung to the roof of his mouth,
"Hoo's Mary McDougal?" she asked.
**I liaena mn her in sax months tae
«peak tae —Mary McDougal—michty."
"Did ye cast ootV"
"There was nae casting oot atoot it,
Maggie. There was never onvthing
at ween us. I've bent the lassie a'my
days an gae*l wi' 'er at an antorin time
juist for friendship's sake. Oh, no,
Maggie, yer clean aff there.
"So ye say, but maybe I've been
Jaearin stories aboot you."
Wha-what did ye hear?"
"Oh, never mind.
"Weel, therea'doon richt leee, every
mooo' them."
"Say as
sure'® death, an I'll believe
I*."
"As sure's death."
"Ye ken what yer a sayin. Dick?"
"I dae, if I should dee this ininit."
"Wha put on yer tie for ye, Dick—
michty, it's juist like a hairan cloot
thrown roond yer neck. Come 'ere, an
I'll sort it for ye."
Dick smiled affectionately, took a
Step toward Mag, placed his arms
akimbo and held up his head.
"There, now," said Mag, after hav
ing taken off his tie and readjusted it
a lit mode.
"Got yer wark a' done, Maggie?"
"Ouy ay —tang sine."
"tat'stak' a walk."
Mag ran into the house to"snoda"
herself up a bit, and Dick walked up
and down in front, humming, "We're
John Tamsan's Bairns." When Mag
emerged, a tartan shawl was thrown
o^er her shoulders, and a small bonnet
adorned her head. Her cheeks were
ruddy as the rose, and her hazel eyes
sparkled with the happiness she felt.
"Whanr'll we gap, Dick she asked,
looking him in the face.
"Whaur dae ye think?" asked Dick,
returning the look with compound in
terest.
"Ony whaur ye like, Dick."
I think we'll gae doon by the burn
an alang by the trees, whanr we used
tae gae, Maggie, ye ken."
It was a delightful evening in the fall
4* the year, and Dick Lang was never
happier in his life, with Maggie Woth
erepoon, the prettiest girl irfthe village,
his side. But Mag was a saucy girl
at times, for she knew her charms, as
every pretty girl does, and when she
was in the mood she loved to tease those
whose admiration or affections she had
won. Nearly every young man in the
Tillage" had made advances to her. and
with one exception she had turned them
•ll against her on account of her saucy,
coquettish ways, which the young men
failed to understand, and invariably
sent them off in a huff. The one excep
tion was Dick Lang, whose love for
Mag was a passion. He had legnn by
eying her at a distance and gradually
getting nearer. At first she treated him
with indifference, and in his presence
had always f*eeuied to think more of
aome one else than of him. Bob Bpald
llig was a strapping young fellow anl
tD all apj»earances made the most prog
jtess in his advances. Of course Mag
Itad as much as denied that there was
anything 1xtween her and Bob, but she
Was so full of fun at times that in order
iD believe implicitly all she said it was
«eces.sary to have it in black and white.
The tear that Bob would carry off Mag
made Dick all the more anxious to win
Iter before it was too late. And the op
portunity he was uow given was all
|jhat he wanted. It was a common say
about the village that Dick was
gather long headed and knew a good
Shing when ho saw it. He knew a lit-'
He of human nature, and l*4ow all
Mag s nonseiiKe ho could discern a true
#nd w&i heart. At all events, Dick
fras determined to have her^if he could.
They had walked atlya mile with
out savin
v weather
bis mind what to «ay and trying to get
courage at the earn© time to. aay it.
Whin thev reached a clump of
not far from the bum, Mag suggested i
that th -y sit down, lriarkTugthat they
had had a big washing at tho house,
and she felt a little tired.
"1 niicht a thocht o* that afore, Mag
gie, if ye'd only telt me." said Dick
repentantly, "but lat's sit doon noo."
"It's a foo' moon the nicht, isn't it,
Dick?" asked Mag, looking up into
space.
"What
did
ye say, Maggie?"
"I asked ye if it was tae bo a foo'
moon—man, whar's yer lugs?"
"Oh—ah—I'm thinkin it is." Then
Dick stroked his chin and tore up the
sod with his heels. "It's a fine thing,
a moon, Maggie, isn't it?" Dick at last
found words to say, in order to break
the monotony and gain time, but with
out being able to explain why he had
said so.
"Hoo is't a good thing?" asked Mag,
looking at him with the tails of her
eyes.
"Weel—a—1—I've heerd it said—a
—that the moon, ye ken, was a gude
thing for a-kirnin milk an preservin
cheese," Dick said,looking very guilty,
not by any means satisfied in his own
mind that he had answered the question
in the right way or had fully compre
hended it, his thoughts at the moment
being in an entirely different direction.
There wHs a merry laugh in Mag's eyes,
but Bhe restrained its vocal expression.
She merely shook for a moment with
the emotion and then tried to appear
serious.
"Maggie," said Dick at length, still
digging up the earth with his heel,
"yer no engaged, are ye, tae ony body
"Engaged?—michty."
-Weel—I was juist speefin, ye
ken"
"An what mak's ye speer a question
like that, Dick?"
Weel—tae tell ye the honest God's
truth, Maggie, I want tae be engaged
tae ye mysel'."
"Dick Lang."
"Aye, 'at's me that's speakin, Mag
gie, an naeither. Mag, lassie, if ye only
kent hoo muckle I loo ye. I haena had
a nicht s sleep thinkin aboot ye for the
last fornicht.''
That's no muckle."
But that's no a*, Maggie. I was
thinkin nlxwt Bob Spaldin. It vras the
thocht o* him takin ye frae me. That
was it, lassie—that was it. I've been
thinkin aboot ye for years."
Mag looked across the fields at the
red ball of fire that formed a great semi
circle on top of a purple hill that bound
ed the far side of the distant glen.
Will ye hae me, Maggie?" asked
Dick imploringly.
No, I winna," came promptly from
her lips.
'Ye winna—O Maggie, think again,
for an answer like that gaes liame like
the str.b o' a knife. Is't possible that
ye dinna ken I've never looed ouybody
but yersel' I've hed nae heart tae gie
tae onybody sin' I kent ye years lang
gane l»y. I'm no sae gude lookin as
Bob Spaldin, an I dinna carry my haid
sae high, an maybe that stands i' my
wi noo. But, Maggie, I've a heart here
that's yours as though it had never be
langed tae me. Whan my granny dees,
1 get 'er biggin, 'er coo an a' 'er chat
tels—that's in 'er will, Maggie. The
hoos wad lie oor ain, an prood wad I
be tae mak' ye its queen. But abune
that, Maggie, I loo ye sairly, an I'll
never loo anither. Think again afore
ye answer me—will ye hae me, Mag
gie?"
Dick took Mag's hand in his, and she
pressed it. She said nothing, but sim
ply smiled. Her silence was accep
tance.—Detroit Free Press.
Serinagur Caihmerc.
Rickety wooden houses, many stories
high, seemed to lean all round us in
every possible direction, each unlike
its neighbor in color and height, though
nearly all with beautifully carved shut
ters, hanging in picturesque angles
from windows, innocent of all other
protection. In the warm sunlight, the
brown and white tones ripened into
rich shades of yellow and red, and here
and there a pale pink house, with em
erald green window frames, threw ip
a strong dash of color, and over its
neighbor's dark carved shutters would
hang strings of red tomatoes drying
in the hot sun.
Most of the houses seemed full of
people who looked out listlessly from
behind their many colored draperies as
we passed. Others, more curious,
crowded together on overhanging ver
andas, which had absolutely no visi
ble means of support,'' but whose inse
curity seemed in no way to affect the
laughing, chattering group of people
upon them. Every here and there the
irregular line of houses was broken by
a narrow street, winding away into al
most black darkness, so sharp was the
contrast between it and its sunny sur
roundings.
Serinagur has six bridges crossing the
Jhelum at various intervals, and be
tween two of these ail fishing is prohib
ited by themaharajah who nominally
governs the land, the reason given le
ing that the soul of a late maharajah
has passed into a fish, who resides in
this part of the river!—Cornhill Mag
azine.
•ttoepiaees la Church.
Somebody has discovered that church
sleepiness is to be explained on scientific
principles. It is, in fact, a condition
of hypnotism, and so far from indi
cating inattention to the sermon shows
rather complete absorption by it.
Fixing one's mind on the voice of the
minister.in the otherwise complete si
lence of tho audience room produces
just the conditions necessary to domi
nation by another's mind, and the nod
ding head and drooping, heavy eyelids
are not eloquent of the preacher's dull
ness, but rather mute testimonials of
his' powerful influence. Thus, one by
one, are hoary traditions fading away
much, Ix-yond talking about before the searching light of science.—
for Dick was making up Exchange.
Vor Libeling a Politician.
WilfNiPEo, Nov. 27.—R. Rk&ard-
treea son, editor of The Tribune, lias been ar
rested on a charge of criminal libel
brought by A. W. Ross, M. P. The
matter arises out of the Wednesday
election. Ross was a candidate for lieu
tenant governor and The Tribune con
nected his name with some electorate
corruption scandal.
Take Off the Pl»l«aaM,
MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 27.—The Y. M, C.
A. will unite with the Y. W. C. A. in
giving a world's fair entertainment on
Thanksgiving evening in the Y. M. C.
A. building. The entertainment is to be
novel in its character, and as a realistic
"take off" on the fair the second floor of
the building is to be turned into a Mid
way Plaisance, with booths for the dif
ferent nationalities.
tiot an Additional Year.
BUCROKN, Wis., Nov. 27.—Gopggc A.
Lee, who had just completed a four
years' term at Waupun for house steal
ing, was brought here and plead guilty
to a charge of grand larceny and was
given one year in prison. Other chafes
are said to be hanging over him.
,SJ#(|
Mo Danger of Starvation.
WASHINGTON, NOV. 27.—Assistant Sec
retary of the Treasury Hamlin says that
the statement that the inhabitants of
the seal islands in Alaska are in danger
of starvation on account of the differ
ences between the treasury department
and the North American Commercial
company as to the accounts of the latter
for supplies furnished the natives during
the past season is without foundation.
Three Bodies Recovered.
Dmtorr, Mich., Nov. 27.—Thwe bod
ies have now been recovered from the
ruins of Edson, Moore & Co.'s building,
which was burned Thursday, and two
others are supposed to be buried be
neath the mass of debris.
Dynamite Cartridge*.
ROCHESTER, N. Y., NOV. 27.—FINE
large cartridges, supposed to be filled
with dynamite, were found beside the
Lehigh tracks a little above the railroad
tracks.
Robber Leader Captured.
LITTLE ROOK, Ark., Nov, 27.—Jack
Williams, the leader of the Oliphant
train robbers, has been arrested and is
in custody of Deputy Sheriff Pcniberton
of Searcy county, who refuses to give
him up without the payment of $1,500.
The Eskimo Bulletin is the only jour
nal published within the arctic circle. It
is printed at Cape Prince of Wales, Alas
ka, and is issued only once a year.
HOW FLOUR IS MANUFACTURER
The Various Processes Through Which
Wheat Passes la the mill.
The noises on the inside of the mill
are deafening. One who has never been
in a flouring mill of the largest size can
jiot realize what a peculiar lot of noises
are made by the machinery. As soon
as the wheat enters the machine from
the long spout which brings it down
from the upper floor it falls between two
rollers of iron—"chilled" iron they call
it, and very hard iron it is too. One of
these rollers revolves rapidly, the other
more slowly, in order that the separa
tion of the coat, or bran, from the ker
nel may be more easily accomplished.
The wheat first passes between rollers
separated just enough to allow the coat
to be crushed. It is then carried away
to the top of the mill again, to a room
where the snn vainly tries to shine in
through the flour coated windows far
above the city's roofs. It next passe?
over a wire sieve which separates the
bran from the kernel proper.
This bran, which contains much of the
flour material, again passes down and is
ground once more, this process being re
peated four times, making five grind
ings, each one finer than the one preced
ing it. Each time the fibrous or braji
portions are more completely separated,
and at last the bran comes out a clear,
brownish husk with every particle ol
flour removed.
The inside part of the kernel has mean
while been going through an interesting
process. After the Irst grinding oi
breaking it passes to a big six sided re
volving reel covered wit^h a fine wire
netting or sieve. Through this reel the
finer portions of the kernels pass, com
ing out in what are called "middlings,'
a granulated mass which goes back to
the rollers for another crushing. This
process is repeated through five reels, all
but the first being of silk. The last one
has 120 threads to the lineal inch. The
flour which comes out of the fifth reel,
while white in hue, is yet not of the fin
est or "patent-' grade, but is classed as
"baker's" or second grade flour.
The middlings above referred to are
purified by an interesting process. They
are passed over a fine wire sieve, through
the upper part of which a streng cur
rent of air is passed. This holds in sus
pense the tiny portions of fibrous mattei
which may have been in the flour, and
at last, after this process of middlings
purifying has been very carefully car
ried out, the flour appears a spotless,
snowy white—the "patent" flour, as it u
called. In the process of grinding in thi«
gradual and repeated way, the germ of
the wheat, a tiny particle about the size
of a mus*ard seed, is separated from th*
white flour. It is what one might call
the life part of the wheat. If it were
ground up, it would not leave the patent
flour so white and powder* so it is sep
arated in one of the oie. ings and passes
into the darker or lower grade flour. If
coutains, however, the ana ^nt
nutritious part of the wheat.
The last tiling that happens to the pul
verized kernel before it is ready fo(
market is the filling of barrels or sacks|
Down many stories through a sntootii
tube comes the white or "iatent" flour.
Under the tube is the barrel or the sack,
as the case may be, and, as it begins to
hll, a steel augur just the size of the bar
rel bores down into the flour, packing it
carefully and solidly beneath the broad
Mad1?*—St. N^hth?,
.7
V,
TEL.BORAPHIC BREVITHM,
*Tbe earl of Cromatic is dead.
A dispatch from Bola repofti
death of Dr. Emin's young son.
the
Sign or Crispi will likely be called
upon to form an Italian cabinet.
The po8tofflce at C'olinzo, McPherson
county, S. D., has been discontinued.
The salaries of officers and employes of
the Northern Pacific are to be again re
duced Jan. I.
The Swiss minister at Washington,
Dr. A. De Clapttmle, has been trans
ferred to Vienna.
Jamas H. Roosevelt has rammed his
duties as secretary of the United States
embassy at London,
Bettina Girard, the actress, tried to
commit suicide. Her last matrimonial
venture was not a success.
The imports of specie at \ort of
Iflew York for the week wetfe $115,292,
of which $80,952 were goM.
The New York Consolidated Gas oom
pany has declared a quarterly dividend
or 2 per cent, payable Dec. 15
Dan Creedon and Bob Fitzsimmons
have signed articles to fight before the
dub offering the largest purse.
Company C, Third infantry,
Roe, has been ordered from
Park, Chicago, to Fort Snelling
Captain
Jackson
A severe snow storm is raging through
out Southern Idaho. Several points re
port from six inches to a foot of snow.
The steamer City of New York, which
went on the rocks at San Francisco a
month ago, has been finally abandoned.
A. L. Mohler has resigned as general
manager of the Gir Northern. His
successor is Oenetu. Superintendent
Case.
Fire destroyed the new Henrietta
theater, the Chittenden hotel and the
Auditorium and Park theater at Colum
bus, O.
A dispatch from Lemberg, Austria,
•ays that Prince Adam Luboinirsky,
while hunting in the forests of Przemyse,
fell dead.
William H. Camp, son of Hugh Camp,
a millionaire real estate owner at Fair
Lawn, N. Y\, was instantly killed by an
express train.
Mary Tower, aged 100 years and 4
months, died at Lorraine, N. J. When
her 100th birthday was celebrated she
was in good health.
A committee to reorganize the Union
Pacific has been named by the stock
holders and the government^.
Brice is chairman.
At Wahpeton, N. D., I. N. George
has sued Dr. N. M. Triplett for $10,000
damages for alleged alienation of the
affectiMM of Mrs. (leorge, plaintiff's
wife.
As the result of a kick in the stomach
and over-exertion in a game of foot ball,
Robert Christy of Delmont, Pa., a fresh
man in the University of Wooster, O., is
dead.
The London Standard says that the
government proposes to spend £1,000,000
in strengthening the defenses of Port
land. The work will occupy 10 years,
and when it is finished roads will be
almost completely enclosed.
Lumber Cot at Dnlnth.
DULUTH, NOV. 27.—Careful estimates
show that !3o,000,000 feet of logs are be
ing put in this winter by the lumbermen
of this district, besides some 50,000,000
feet that are put in by local men for out
side mills, the Meyerhausers, the Rat
Portage mills and others. About 124,
000,000 feet of logs are on hand, giving
about $50,000,000 feet for the mills next
an rattier.
LATK8T MARKET PRICKS.
M. Paul Union Stock Tarda.
•JOUTH
ST. PAOL.
NOV.
25,
IML
HOf?S lt»e higher and active demand ex
ceeded supply yards cleared early to packsra
at tbe advance quality fair.
CATTLE-strong and active fair demad for
all grades.
Priiue steers, $3. i6®3.50: good steers, $2.S0»
3.U0 pri ne cows, $2. [email protected] good cows. $3.00
common to fair cows, $1. &2.00, llgh.
veal calves, %lM((sA &r, heavy calvtn, &
a.Oo stock
em, fl.Jii&ii.dO feeders, #2.&>u,3.00
bulls, [email protected]
SHEKP-Good demand far food batcher
•tuff and feedera.
Mutt job, $2.0&3.00 Iambi,
Blockers and feeder-, |1.25a#.i.
Receipt*: Hons, 1,000 cattle, XXL
Minneapolis Orala.
MINNEAPOLIS NOT.
WHEAT—No.l hard ca*h, tslj^c November,
61J4c liecember.tile No. I Northern,
cash, November. flO^c December,
May, No. 2 Northern, cash, 6S^c No,
rejected, 4Ao. On Track—No. 1 North
ern, to arrive, 6Jc.
Chicago Live Stock.
CHICAOO,
&J.N5 £3 HO
UAILT
NOV. 26. 1803.
CATTLE—Nominally weak at a decline of
2 &40c for the week no steers below *5.^9
cows 25c lower an 1 Texans 10: lower top
beeves strong Christmas beeves, $4.44|«.10
prime, $4.81^5.25 exports, $4 &»@4.75 KOOD,
$4.i0((£4.f.0 medium, common to
fair,
cows,
$1.00
BANHIXW,
Noticc.
Lsod Office st Mitchell, 8. D., Oct. 28,1883.
Notice is bereby (riven tbst the fellowiog-osmed
settler ha» filed notice of his intention to make
fliml proof in support of hi* claim, snd thst fnid
proof will bo made before the clerk of the circuit
court, in snd for Lske county, H. D., st Madison,
S. on December 1. 189H, viz: .Jonas H. John
son, for the hec. 6. Twp. 108 NRjf- 54 W.
for the (T. E. No. 14i517. He natnes the fol
lowing witnesses to prove his continnoui* reei
deuce upon and cultivation of raid land, vis:
Andrew JarobHon, W. A Kennedy and (•. Maom
Iter, of Oldham P. O.. and Allen Towle. of Towle
p. a, s.
OIIHI
Oated at Madison, 8. !., November 11,18H8.
J. 0. WILLIAMSON,
County a dae.
Notice—Timber Culture.
U. 8. Land Oflce, Mitchell, 8.
LEAPRRdaydaily
IML
VVliEAT May opening. 834c highest, «4c|
lowest, 8354c cloae, i®^c: November closed a|
December opening, 58^highest,
lowest, closing, Wfao. On Traoa—
No. 1 hard, SlHfec No. 1 Northern, 40c N«i S
Northern. M^c. ________
Xulath Grain.
DULUTH.
NOV.
sto kers and
feeders, Texas steers, |2.50
Texas cows, $
:.~0^'.'.00 Western steers, 82.73®
4.10 Western cows. $ .2qg£l.£5.
HOif.S Opened strong, supply cleared.
Kortgh and common $.rj.l:Kg/».15 packing and
shipping, $5.lVflj5.25 prime heavy and butch,
ers, $5.uU^5.&Sk prime sorted light,{5.70.
v
SHKEPAND LAMBS-Dull. Prime weth
ers, &J.7-'0k4.25 fair to good wethers, $3.5U
4.60 fair to good mixed, $3.0W(&.3.40 all ewes,
|2.76fea.OO common to fair, $
1.00^.50 priiue
iambs, fair to od,$.'1.7.{j4.£» com
mon to fair, |2. 5®5150 western cheep,
Receipt®—Cattie, 3,501, including M&) Tex
us no Westerns: hogs, 11,000.
Grain and Provisions.
CHICAUO, N»V. UttX
CIJOSIKO
PKICKS.
WHEAT Firm. Cash,
SSJ
iSKc May
CORN -Steady. Cash, and December, 36)4c
May, 3W4u.
bARI—Firm.
x\
OATS Steady,
Oasis.
January, $12.57)6 May,
Jan nary, $7J5 May, (TjH
^OLI.KrTlOXN,
CHA8. §. MiHNEDY, J. H. WILUMAS0N.
Vioe PresidetA*
R. K. KRATZ, Register.
Notice.
Land Office st Mftchell, 8. D., Oct. 12, 1WW.—
Notice is ^cre'i) given tbst the followlng-nained
settler hae filed notice ol his intention to make
proof in rnpport of his cla'm, and thst ssld
proof will be made before the clerk of the cir
cuit conrt, in and for Lske county, 8. D., at
Madison, 8. I)., on November •i5, 1S« viz: Wil
liam H. Kennedy, for the northwest quarter,
section 5. township HIS north, ranee 54 west, 5tb
F. M. (H. E. No. U8,l»55.) He names the follow
ing witnesses to prove his continooos residence
upon and cultivation of, mud Isnd.
VIE:
Andrew
Jacobson, Jona* lrrhnson, U. W. Msssker snd
Kzra Lee, aJ of Oldham P. 0,,8. D.
K. N. KKATZ.RegtMn.
Notice of Hearing of Petition.
StKte of South Dakota, count* of Lske In
county court. Whereas, John llneeker having
applied for a druggist s permit to sell intoxicat
ing liquors under the provision* and restrictions
of the laws of this rtate governing the sale of In
toxicatiog liijuors, at his place of business on
Kuan svenue, in toe city of Madison, county of
Lake and state ot South Dakota: therefore no
tlce is herebv given, that the 12*h day of Decem
ber, A. D. 1WW, at the office of tbe county judge,
in the said city of Madison, in Lake county, 8.
D.^at 2 o'clock p. m., has been set for hearing
said petition, when and where any person quali
fied may appear and show cause why said peti
tion should not be granted.
., Noy.
a newspaper printed and
published at Madison, in said countv, and per
sonally served on all ^persons interested In said
estate, residing in said county, at least fourteen
days before said day of hearing, anC upon ail
other persons interested.accord!ng'tolaw.
Dated at Madl-on, 8. D., the 34th day of No
vember, A. I), ixirj.
By the court,
Atteatr J. H. WILLIAMSON,
J. M. PRESTOW, Judge of the County Court,
Clerk ol the County Court.
FIKMTIKK.
•Myfrrik*,?
3p»
7'
2S, 1808.
fii
i Mmm:
••««. V
...
un
gi
A. B. Olmore
l»K(J«4t»
C. H. WOOD,
•*—DEALER JN-
DRUGSand MEDICINES
Ftlft STATIONERY,'
8U,
Wall Papers and choice Perlumw
^Honest John5
TRUSS
December,
The Finest Trws la
the market.
A New InTentioal
Bjosmber,
May. V
FORK
Finn.
Prescription* carefully ©mnpoundei day
or niaht.
rGAN AVE.,
MADISON,
Bt«,
Tffi MADISON STATE BANK
A General Banking Business Transacted.
Lqqds, Loqqs, Insqic(i|ce
Madison, South Dakota
CORRESPONDENTS.
Quaker City National Bank,Philadelphia, Pen*.
National Bank of Illinois, Chicago, 111,
National bank of Sioux City, Iowa.
90,1893.
Complaint having been entered at this office
by Joseph Brenckner uga n-l the heirs of L«ui«
Altpeter, deceased, for failure to comply with
law as to timber culture entry No. 13.563, dat«-d
A ril 29. IsHtt, upon the southwest quarter sec
tion &>, township ItIti north, range 51 went, 5th
P. M., 'ii Lake county, S, D., with a view to the
concel'.ation of said entry, contestant aliening
that the heir* and legal representatives of said
claimant have wholly abandoned said land: that
»«id tract is u«t cultivated a«| required bvlaw
that said heirs and claimant have failetj to lireakj
plough or cultivate any of said tract as requirea
by the Timber Culture law that claimrut haf
failed to plant trees, tree seeds or cutting oqi
said tract a-required by law that there is nt
cultivated land now on the tract, nor are there
any trees, tree needs or cutting* now on the land
as required by the Timber Culture law that
nald claimant or his lielri" have not in any way
compiled with the Timber Cu ture laws that
aid default ftill exifts that said heirs have
failed to hrenk. plough or plant dnring the
vearf lS^tt to 18H8. Tne said parties are herehy
summoned to appear Bt this office on- th« 2d day
of January, 1*!M. ai 1 o'clock p. in., to respond
and furmeii UeUxuuuv concerning said alleged
failure, R. N.KKATZ, Register.
Order to Show Cause.
S'tate of South Dakota, countv of Lake. ss. In
county court, Nov. mher 2-4, 1S03 In the natter
of tbe estate of Abner l. Hartfleld, deceactd. On
e dibi ana filling the petition of C. J. Button,
administrator, netting forth the amount of per
sonal e tate that has come to bl's hands, and the
disposition thereof the amount of debts out
standing agaiitct said deceived, and a deccription
of all the real -state which said deceased died
seized, snd the conditioL and value of the re
spective portions thereof and prajing that
license be to him grnnted to sell all the real es
tate belonging to said estate. And it sppeanng,
by said petition, that there i« not sufficient per
sonal estate in the hxndx of said administrator to
pay said nebt-, and that it fc necussary, in order
to pav ti e same, to sell all of said real estate It
Is therefore ordered, that all persoi s interested
if said estate, appear before the judge of thla
court, on Saturday the 28rd day of December, A.
D. IfWS, at 2o'clock p. m., at the court house in
Mndis .n, in said county, then and there tosho
cause (it auy there be) why license should not he
granted to said admisintrator to sell said real ei
tate according to the prayer of said petition.
At it is further ordered, that a copy of this or
der shall be published for four successive weeks
prior to said of hearing in the MADISOM
J.L. J0N£8
Gaahkw!»
*&£•», Ar. A«
W. W. PATTERSON
GASOLINE HMD
WEUE
OILS!
Also, WQQfi AND COAL ot all
kinds,
CITY DRAYINGh
Coal ordered by Telephone.
COAL.
Hubbell Bros.
are sole agents for
CROSS CREEK
Lehigh Coal.
Guaranteed
to pro#wce 10 per cent www#
and contain 15 per cent less ashe§
than any other coal in the market,
A full line of soft Coal.
MKRCHANT TAILOB1KU.
THOMAS, THK TAILOR.
Business Suits,
Pants,
Overcoats, &e.
The very Latest" Fashions In Gentle
men's Apparel. Call and examine stodlt
and leave your order.
MKAT NAKKKTS.
Meat Market
Keeps constantly on hand a full
line of
Fresh and Cured Meats,
Fish, Fowl and Game, in season.
6QETHFI & "HULTZ.
MTR,
FKKI». OIL.*. 4km
S. A. HASKELL,
(Successor to C. J. Button,)
4
FLOOR
msdieiaea ia
KoorOo*
Ooeatste
Addnas
fe.50
42 50
12.25
12.00
FOfl

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jHJti
JMJI1
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and
l«in
mai
ftr:
iron
FEED
Gasoline and Kerosene
Vo. S iu£ar tflock. Detroit* Mlsfc.^.
qrtsM tap Maaibotj by F. U. Smith O
^Tood, K.Woods & Co., O. Tweed MM!
druKgifits everywhere,
W. L. DOUGLAS
S3 8HOE noTWP.
Do yem wear them? When next tn need try ptlfc?
Best In tho world*
*5.0(1
#4.00,
If yos want a fine DRESS SHOE, made In the latest
styles, don't pay
$6
to
$8,
DO
try my
so by purchasing W.
S
L.
l+'ng
or
Di
be u
or cl
COMPOUND.
tea. Is
no mbatituU, or laoiosetl I
twr, and w« will aaBd.se
seated partlouian l&i
D(
ciall
Fr
Io
fug
find
iron
Mi
hi a
uot s
Oci
BU'lUl
tiot 8]
'ol
it tt'l
provi
Plo
vestei
rakes
and
Phi
Uiiri
00
sS
£2.50
*2.00
1
K:
ui
th
FOR LA0IESF
carde*
S ili
provii
*2.00
*1.75.
FOIt BOYft
Sal]
I.7C
Tai!
that li
Strf
ri'illst
Imiost
llt( tltf
«r
$3, $3.50, $4,00 or
$5 Shoe, They fit equal to custom made and look and
wear as well, If you wish to economize in your footwear,
VUM
Douglas Shoes, Name
price stamped on th» bottom, look for it when you
W.
L.<p></p>THE
AND
boy
DOUGLAS. Brockton.
Mass.<p></p>FAIR,
PALM ER k CAREY, Props,
1 V
1
i
i
i IV Z't
iii thii
All
(tonal
duty-,
upon
under
Wrft
Sold by

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