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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 19, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1895-11-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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SULTAN SCARED
Believed the Turkish Ruler Will
Now Try to Stop the
Massacres.
Assembling of the Great Fleets
of the Powers Not at All to
His Liking.
Lives of the Sultan and Cabinet
in Very Great Danger, It
Is Stated.
LOVDOX, NOT. 19.—It is understood in
•well informed circles here that the as
sembling of the British and foreign
fleets in Salonica bay is having a good
effect upon the Turkish government,
and that the saltan has finally deter
mined to make earnest efforts to put
stop to the bloodshed in Asia Minor.
It is understood that the Marquis of
Salisbury has received assurances that
the sultan has dispatched commission
ers to Asia Minor, instructed to put in
force as soon as practicable the reforms
insisted upon bv the powers, and that
THE srtTAW OF TURKEY.
beyond the assembling of the foreign
fleets off Salonica, the powers will take
no further steps at present, being desir
ous of giving the Turkish government
every opportunity possible of restoring
order in the disturbed districts without
having recourse to measures which
might add to the state of anarchy pre
vailing.
A Cry Kor Relief.
The following telegram was received
by the Anglo-Armenian association:
"Tho Armenians are being massacred
everywhere in Asia Minor. Over
100,000 aro dying of starvation and ex
posure. The Sassoun work of relief is
clrwed.
"For God's sake urge the government
to stop the most awful events of modern
days. The porte is powerless, as all the
telegraphs are under the control of the
palace officials who have incited the
massacre throughout Anatolia."
A dispatch received here from Rome
says that advices which have reached
there from Constantinople announce
that the agitation against the Christians
of Northern Syria is extending and that
massacres have occurred near Aleppo.
A BEAUTIFUL STATE OF THINGS
Two Ilattalloiis of Troops Guard the Sul
tan—Young Turk Movement Grow#.
CONSTANTINOPLE, via Varna,Nov. 19.
—Anti-Christian placards have been
torn down by the police at Scutari, Al
bania, where a dangerous agitation is
in
progress.
The Turkish officials do
not seem to be doing more than making
a show of frowning ujjon it.
The Armenian leaders of Constanti
nople are compelled to keep in hiding
for fear of arrest. The Turkish police
continue throwing Armenians into
prison, and secret executions are said to
be of frequent occurrence.
liotten Up to Detract Attention.
The young Turks movement is
actively proceeding in spite of the des
perate efforts made by the Turkish
officials to suppress it, and it is said
that much of the onslaught upon Ar
menians is due to the fact that the porte
desires to detract attention from the
Mohammedan agitation against the sul
tan. The palace spies and police are
kept busy night and day in Constauti
nople but this does not prevent the
revolutionary movement from spread
ing.
Sultan'M Life In Ianger.
The two battalions of troops and the
detachment of artillery at the Yildiz
Kiosk are kept closely within the
grounds of the palace. The life of the
sultan is known to be in danger, and
the lives of nearly all the ministers have
been threatened.
Hassan Pasha, minister of marine, is
known to distrust the navy to the extent
that he has a guard of troops and, it is
claimed, dares not go aboard a war
vessel.
Kufttem Pasha Dying at London.
LONDON, Nov. 19.—Rustem Pasha,
the Turkish ambassador to the court of
St. Jamas, is dying of influenza.
Rustem Pasha is an Italian by birth,
and was known as Count Malini pre
vious to entering the service of Turkey.
He was at one time governor of Leb
anon, and is described aa having been
very just and firm official.
'/IJITNEY -HOT
A
ATould Not Acrrpt Presidential Nomina
tion t'nrier Any on»t«ler(»t ion.
PHILADELPHIA, NOV. iW.—William C.
Whitney's rumored candidacy for pres
ident is positively denied by one of
Philadelphia's most prominent finan
ciers who is closely connected with Mr.
Whitney in the traction syndicate and
other enterprises He says that it is
truo when President. Cleveland visited
Mr Whitney on the occasion of Mis?
Whitney'* marriage he and hisex-secre
tary of the navy did discuss national
politics at the met ting lietween them,
lut it is true ulso that Mr. Whitney's
name was not mentioned in connection
with the Democratic nomination, nor
did Mr Cleveland express a desire that
Mr Whitney should become the Demo
cratic standard bearer in next year's
presidential struggle.
The Philadelphian asked Mr. Whit
ney a day or two ago to define his posi
tion on the question of his becoming
the Democratic nominee for president.
I have denied that report so often.''
Mr. Whitney said, "that I do not intend
paying any more intention to it. But
to you I will repeat, under no consider
ation will I accept the nomination for
president."
WAS A PECULIAR ENTERTAINMENT
Row In MU Iowa Theater in Which Ripe
Fruit WHS Prominent.
CEDAK KAPIIH. Ia.. Nov. 19— The
four Cherry sisters are unsophisticated
country girls who run a farm near this
city, and who in the past four years
have gained much notoriety by reason
of the unique entertainments which
they give They attempted to give one
of these entertainments in the Daniels
Opera House at Marion, but it
Hon. Sidney Clarke, chairman of Okla
homa's statehhod executive committee,
has called a statehood convention to
meet at Shawnee Dec. 4. The conven
tion promises to be the largest and most
important statehood meeting ever held
in the territory. A strong delegation
will be sent to Washington from Okla
homa and the Chickasaw Nation to
push the claims for statehood.
LETTER FROM THE CZAR.
Suggeitts I'nitui of Kuuia, France ani)
Germany, If England Initials Too Much.
NEW YOKK, NOV. 111.—A special to
The Herald from St. Petersburg says*
The grand dukCvVlodimir has an auto
graph letter from the czar to the kaiser,
relating to the situation in Eastern
Europe. It suggests that in case Eng
land insists too much
011
JUrtiSlSOtl
CANDIDATE
was
brought to a sensational close in less
than half an hour, amidst the most in
tense excitement. Scores of fellows
wen in the audience with baskets and
bags of decayed fruit, and when the
6isters appeared on the stage they were
made the target of these fellows, who
soon drove them back behind the wings.
When their manager appeared on the
stage and sought to put a stop to this,
he was so roughly handled that he was
rendered unconscious.
The audience was then dismissed, the
officers present making no attempt to
put a stop to the disgraceful proceed
ings. It is feared the manager's in
juries may result seriously. Suits for
damages will probably be instituted
against the city of Marion and the man
ager of the opera house.
MUST KEEP 0UT_ OF POLITICS
Chicago Delegate* to the Federation
Convention 80 Instructed.
CHICAGO, NOV. 19.—What is expected
to be the hardest fight that will occupy
the time of the coming convention of
the American Federation of Labor was
started Sunday at the meeting of the
trades and labor assembly, when that
body went on record as being opposed
to the future discussion of politics in
trades unions and instructs its delegates
to the coming convention to work
against all political measures that
might be brought into the convention
Oklahoma Statehood Convention.
OKLAHOMA CITY, (). T.. NOV. 10.—
the disinte­
gration of Turkey, the three powers
who united upon the Japanese question
should again join hands agaiust all
comers.
Staked Off by Lot Jumper*.
I CaiPPLK CHEEK, Col., Nov. 19.—^
ruiaor having gained currency that th
title to the Reddick placer,
011
tin* edge
of the city, had been Invalidated by the
secretary of the interior, ali the ground
has been staked off by lot jumpers, who
have erected tents or shacks to enable
theui to hold their claims.
New Plan For War oa Saloon'.
FLINT, Mich., Nov. 19.—The saloon
has a new foe in this city. The Con
gregationalists have authorized the
pastor to throw the church doors open
Saturday afternoons in order that
farmers and others who come to the
city may find a place to warm them
selves and to spend a pleasant hour be
sides a saloon.
The Horaeleaa Wagon Ea Route.
POCCHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Nov. 111.—The
horseless carriage left this city at 9.30
a. m. for Chicago. The machine was
given a thorough overhauling before it
started and Manager Mcpherson ex
pects to reach Hudson by night..
Houtrimitlw and Hridgemen Oat.
NEW YORK, Nov. 19.-Eight hundred
members of the Housesmith and Bridge
men's union were called on strike on
buildings where the work is being done
by J. B. & J. M. Cornell and Milliken
Bros., two of the most prominent mem
bers of the Iron league.
ESTABLISHED 1890. MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1895. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TO TALK FINANCE
The Principal Topic of Cleve
land's Next Message Will
Be Money.
Wants Greenbacks Retired Be
cause of Their Menace to
the lleserve.
Secretary Morton's Annual He
port Devoted to the Inspec
tion of Cattle.
WASHINGTON, NOV. 19 President
Cleveland, in his annual message to
congress, it is stated, will recommend
the retirement of greenbacks. This rec
ommendation will be the chief feature
of the message, so far as domestic af
fairs are concerned.
The president lias had a number of
conferences with Secretary Carlisle at
Woodley concerning this part of the
message. It is learned from excellent
sources that the financial part of thp
message has been mapped out and
agreed upon. The president will re
turn to the attack upon congress for a
reform of our currency methods, which
proved unavailing last winter.
Has Done All He Could.
He will say that the executive has
done all within his constitutional power
to protect the national credit under the
clumsy system now vogue, and will
point out what the dangers of this sys
tem are. He will take the ground that
the difficulty is not in any sense one of
revenue, but of the attempt to maintain
a gold reserve and hundreds of millions
of notes redeemable in gold upon do
mand at the same time.
The form of remedy agreed upon le
tween the president and Secretary Car
lisle, and to be set forth in the message,
consists of a recommendation that the
statute of 1878, requiring the secretary
of the treasury to reissue United States
notes as soon as they are paid into the
treasury, be repealed, and that he be
Given Authority to Retire Them
from circulation. Also that the secre
tary be authorized to exchange for the
greenbacks at any time a new issue of
government bonds of long term to run
and at a low rate of interest. It is the
belief of the president and the secretary
that the entire outstanding issue of
greenbacks would be quickly presented
at th*s treasury counters by the banks
of the country in exchange for these
bonds, and that the bonds would soon
be deposited as a basis of an increased
circulation of national bank notes.
MR. MORTON'S ANNUAL REPORT
It I« Mostly Devoted to the Subject of
Cattle Inspection.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 19.—The report
of the secretary of agriculture begins
with a review of the work of the bureau
of animal industry. The total numl«r
of animals inspected at the slaughter
houses was considerably over 18,000,000.
an increase of more than 5,500,000 over
the previous year. During the year
antemortem inspection was also made
of 5,000,000 animals. The cost of in
spection was reduced to 1.1 cents per
animal. In Ibllli inspection cost 4?4
cents per animal and in 1894 it cost l?4
cents
Over 1,300,000 animals, cattle and
sheep were insected for foreign markets,
of which (175,000 were sluj i abroad
Over 45,000,000 pounds of por* were in
spected microscopically and exported, as
against :10.0K),000 in lb94 and {3,000,000
pounds in 1*93.
Market* for American Meat.
Much space is devoted to discussing
the opportunities for American meat
products in foreign markets. Of 341,000
tons of meat received at the London
Central market
111
1 1
1894, 71,000 tons
were American, while nearly 50,000
tons came from Australia. The Amer
ican pro}Krtion has not been maintained
during 1895.
In the imports of live cattle to Great
Britain, the United States and Canada
had a practical monopoly until the last
two years. Since 1893 Argentina's
shipments have increased. During the
eight months of the year, ship
ments amounted to over 25,000 head.
Althotfeli the meat of the South Amer
ican cattle is not as salable as the
American, the business is profitable and
likely to increase. American cattle
sell, though slaughtered soon after
landing at prices equal to the average
paid for British carcasses
ARE GROWING
Report
IN POPULARITY
to Secretary Herbert on Oar
Naval Militia.
WASHINGTON, NOV. 19—Assistant
Secretary McAdoo lias transmitted to
Secretary Herbert the
report
EFJUF BITS OF NEWS.
An epidemic of typhoid fever ii raff
ing at It dishorn, N. D. Impure water
is said to le the cause.
Congressman Dol'iver and
Charles O. Hoffman, assistant cashier
of the New Orleans Brewing association,
il reported to be about 1^0,000 short.
William Dickerman, publisher of Tho
Counterfeit Money Detector, has been
arretted for passing counterfeit money.
John Swan, alias John Mitchell, of
Columbus. Wis., aged t0 years, was ar
rested ar Worcester. Mass., for lolyg
amy
The Taylor brothers, the condemned
murderers of the Meeks family, were
caught with burglar tools in their pos
session.
In spite of elaborate precautions by
police, several of the guests at the
Paget-Whitney wedding are said to
have been relieved of valuables by pick
pocket-.
The executive committee of the Order
of Elks have selected Cincinnati as the
place lor the next national convention
beg.nnnig on the second Tues .ay in
July. l^'.Ki.
THE SMAlL BOAT FOUNDERED
TWMI}' Italian KiiiiKritntr Fo Mut
V .Ymrrlr.i Drowned.
G¥BK\LTAH, Nov. !9.—Over 20 pas
sengers from the Italian -tcainship -ol
ferino were drowned by the swamping
of one o: the small boats. Twelve hun
dred »migrants from (ienoa, Ita.v,
bound for uth America, were on
board the steamship at the time. Ail
were landed safely save the scon* oi
more in the single small bout. The Sol
ferino went ashore near Outa She was
commanded by Captain Cai.iro.
LATEST MAilKET KEP0HT8.
Milwaukee (irtuu.
Mll.W At K liK, .S I) v. Hi. 1 U
FLOirU—Very ..ull
WliKAT No. spring. 5u7Bo, No. 1
North, in, 08,'sc May.
COKS-NJ.
a,
CAT~—No. 'J wuite. lW^c. No. 3 white,
l'c.
Minneapolis (irafn.
MIN K.vro Lj, NOV. 1m,
WHEAT—.soveinoer cl.-il
December,
Ala., _ni
TrncK—.NO. 1 hard, 4«c o.
1
A^ay No. 1 North, ru. .HJ4--
St. Paul t'ntoil Stock Yards.
.si' i'AU... Nov. I»,
HOGS—... .et was steady and active.
Range at pri«. -s .4.80^3.40
CAi'iL.ii. iu rfnt siocii. rs and Leuvy
feeuer• linn and uc.itv medium Weight
btt^r-slow co.11.11 u nui.' 1 -tint and
calmer 8m mure avy teeders vvanicU.
Jjnii.rjp—Jliiruiii s e o. f^oud she
aiiil auto
Hectripis
e«/in,n ver» dull.
Chicago I
17JHe May, lio^s.
POitiV—
OV. III»
7 a n u a y
uf Lieu­
tenant Niblack upon the operations of
the naval militia during the past year.
In indorsiilg the report Mr. McAdoo
says that the organizations are growing
rapidly in favor and the interest of the
public in them is steadi.y increasing.
This organization, founded on patriotic
zeal, is entitled to every encouragement
at the hands of the government. Speak
ing of the results of his own inspection
of the various battalions last summer,
he says that above all things they need
national encouragement and sufficient
boats to perfect themselves in drill
CHAS. KFNNKMY,
President.
Miss
Louise Pearsons will 1*' married at Fort
Dodge, la., Wednesday.
It is hinted that the next Democratic
national convention will abolish the
two-thirds nominating rule.
It is ftlimited that £300,000 has been
dropped into Northern Montana tins
teasai tor stock shipped out.
A Ion lias been orn to Prince Ferdi
nand, ruler of Bulgaria, and his wife,
PrioCess Marie Louise of Bulgaria.
Madison,
Northern.
JiNwruiem,
Duluth ti.aiu.
OULLTH. OV. IS, 189V
WHEAT—h No. 1 hard, a^c No.
1 Nortuern, AO. 2 Northern,
80J^c -NO. 2 spring, •i'Jtiia,ixj rejected,
37^40^0. To arrive—No. 1 h.trd,
No. I Northern, 54%c November Nu. 1
hard, 5c. -»o. I Nor neru, 54fcc Decem
ber -No 1 hard, ..5^e .NO .Nortueru,
'•y.
\aril
•m.
[)1 il.t-S
IILI A 1 O 11 V.
HOG- .darn, i r.ii..er 1 .u
we.t.v to e low
Sales iM. 1 a at
|3. .0^3. •«.» mixed:
pacKiiig .wKi hipping
0 i Uj^u.
•i .T5
SHEriPx—Market ste.idy.
lor heavy
lot- *.*,40 (1) i0 l'or
roii^ii.
CATTLE—Alariiei steady to .-wronger,
liee^es, $.!. l5 a U» cows and hems,
11.4 (a3.0». Texas .-leers, $-!. 7') Wesi
*rns, stockers and feeders,
*4.2 frt3.*V»
Hecfipts: llogs, 55,(XKi. :at !e. 16.0J0
llieep, .0, U0.
Chicago Grain and ProvlHiona.
i.'HICAOo,
No.. 18. 1S.I.Y
CLOSI .0 I'UM Ks.
WHKAT—Novetuoer, Deeeinb -r,
J7!c Ma 6 jjgc.
CoKN Nuve nber,
|7„c May, 29^
OAT.S Nov mb r,
December,
7LV
Dee rnb-r,
»7
I) ceiuber.
2
Ma
Awarded
Highest Honors—World'5 Fair,
DCt'
MOST PERFECT MA^H.
A pure Crape Cream 6f Tartar Powder. Free
from Ammonia, Alum or any other adulterant.
40 YEARS THE STANDARD.
ts BY
THE HADISON
State Bank,
fladison, S. D.
A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
Fa rm Loans &-f Lowest
URATES'#-'
0. D. KOLDRIOGE & SON.
Attorneys Counsellors
AT LAW.
South Dak
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Over
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As
A LOCAL
NEWSPAPER
mURUUmiHIifttlU^iiililBlltlllUUIlllUHitllltHiU
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The Best
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farmers of Laka County.
It tfures the
City and
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Complete,
besides a large amount of import­
ant
STATE AND NATIONAL NEWS
carefuly compiled
from oar daily issues
J. II. WlLIilAMSOH
Vit
President.
Heart Disease 30Yrs!
Short Breath, Palpitation.
Mr. G. W. McKinsev, postmaster of
Kokomn, Intl., and a bra.vs ex-soldier,
savs: "L h: il been severely troubled
with lie rt iii-e:i.o e wr siru o le.iving
the army at, tiie clostj of the late war.
I was troubled Willi *»a.Ipit at ion and
shortness of breath. I could not
sleep oa my loft side, and had pain
around my heart, i became so ill
that I wa.-t much alarmed, and for
tunately my attention was called to
Dr. Miles' Heart Cure
I decided to try it. The first -bottle
made a decided improvement in my
condition, and live bottles have com
pletely cured me.''
G. W. McKINSEY. I'. M., Kokorno. Ind
Dr. Mil os Heart. Onro Is sold on a positive
guarantee that the lirstl*t tlo will U'lietit.
All druK^istssi'il it a!
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it will be bent, prepaid, on reeript of price
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