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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 11, 1896, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1896-09-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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NO INSTRUCTIONS
Senator Hill Refuses to Attend
the IJew York State
Convention
Unless He Is Free to Do Just as
He Sees Fit in Regard to
Silver.
Instructions by the District Con
vent ion Call Out a Vigorous
Protest,
ALBANY, N. Y., Sept. 11.—United
States Senator Hill telejn*aphed as fol
lows to Norton Chase, chairman of the
Albany county Democratic convention
"I observe in the morning papers
that I have been elected delegate from
the Third Albany district to the state
convention, under instructions to vote
for the indorsement of the Chicago
platform and candidates. This action
is taken in opposition to my wishes and
judgment as expressed. to you Wednes
day, and I decline to accept the election
upon the conditions imposed, or upon
any conditions which would restrict
my freedom at Buffalo to act in such a
manner as I considered best for the in
terests of my party."
MONTANA REPUBLICANS.
The Silver Faction on Top In the Helm
Convention.
HELENA, Mon., Sept. 11.—The Re
publican state convention reconvened
at 10 :80, but as the committee on per
manent organization asked more time,
the convention adjourned until 1:80.
From the very start the gold and sil
ver factions locked horns, and up to
adjournment at 5 oclock the silver men
had shown their majority over the gold
faction. United States Senator Man
tle, chairman of the state central com
mittee,
AddretMetl the Convention
almost an hour. He urged the dele
gates to carry out the plan recom
mended in the report of the Butte con
ference. That report recommended
both factions to remain together and
nominate a state ticket and adopt a
platform excepting the financial clause,
when the silver men will withdraw and
each faction insert a clause to its lik
ing, besides each nominating their own
congressman and set of electors.
At the night session the convention,
by a vote of 156 to 154, seated the Man
tle contesting delegates from Butte,
giving the silver men absolute control
of the convention. The debate over
the matter was not as exciting as was
anticipated, the delegates having
calmed down before the night session
began. The appointment of the oom
mittees finished the evening session.
ALL PARTIES IN IT.
Democrats, FopulUta, Republican* and
Silver Men In Conference.
DENVER, Sept. il.—The joint confer
ence committee of the Democratic,
Populist, Republican and Bilver parties
in meeting in this city for the purpose
of arranging a fusion on state officers.
The session is secret. Indications are
that a joint ticket will be put out by
the Democrats, Populists and silverites
and the Republicans will have an inde
pendent ticket. The Populist and sil
ver conventions are awaiting a report
from their conference committees. The
Democratic electoral ticket has been
endorsed by the Republicans, the Pop
ulists and the silver conventions, en
curing a solid front for Bryan and Sew
«11, whatever the outcome of the at
tempt to secure a fusion silver state
ticket.
SILVER MEN IN CONTROL.
Mew Name
Jersey Dcmorrnta Meet and
residential E ectors.
TRENTON, N. J., Sept. 11.—'^e Dem
ocratic state convention met were and
nominated presidential electors. The
silver men were in absolute control of
the convention. A noticeable feature
was the absence of the old leaders
Two or three gold men had been
elected from townships in Essex
county, but the committee of that
county had refused them credentials
One of these made an attempt to speak
in the convention but was unsuccessful
The action of the county committee
was sustained by the committee on
credentials and unanimously endorsed
by the convention.
Populists to Name Four.
HARRWBi'RG, Pa., Sept. 11.—The Detn
ocratic state convention has reconvened
for the purpose of filling vacancies on
the electoral ticket created by the with
drawal after the Chicago convention of
about one-third of the electors selectod
at the Allentown convention on April
g? There was a good attendance and
the silver men were in complete control
The populists are allowed to name four
electors
Named Against His Protest.
APFtETON, Wis Sept. 11 —At th«
Democratic congressional convention of
the Eighth Wisconsin district
George W. Gate of Stevens Point was
Bominated unanimously in spite of hit
positive dechuutiou by telegraph.
JudS«
STICKNEl'S ELEVATOR SCHEME
Omaha Railroad Men Inclined to Ba la
eredulona About It.
OMAHA, Sept. LL —The announcement
of the intention of President A. B.
Stickney of the Chicago Great Western
'road to build a series of grain elevators
throughout the West, caused consider
able discussion among local railway
men. While nearly all who com
mented on tha matter viewed it in
credulously, there was a general senti
ment that whatever new scheme Presi
dent Stickney was likely to spring on
the railway world at any moment could
never be foretold, and there might be
6ome foundation for the story of his
latest move. Ever since this official
made the startling statements regard
ing the operations of railroads before
the interstate commerce commission,
the officials of other roads have regard
ed him with something akin to awe
and are not inclinded to t^mmeut on
the report that he will build a series of
grain elevators hereabouts, through the
aid of European capital.
Freight Traffic Manager Munroe of
the Union Pacific, said he thought if
Mr. Stickney had $5,000,000 to spend,
he could now buy all the grain elevators
he wanted at very low figures. He
said, however, that the prevailing ten
dency among railroads today was to
do away with grain elevators at all in
termediate points, the shipments being
made directly from the points of origin
to Chicago and other points of destina
tion. Still, if the Chicago Great West
ern road wanted elevators at inter
mediate points, it could probably buy
them cheap now, certainly for less
money than it could build them.
RAILROADS AND ELEVATORS.
Strained Relations i* Kaniai City Cnl
mlnate in Open Warfare.
TOPERA, Kan., Sept. 11.—The strained
relations existing for a long time be
tween Kansas City grain merchants,
elevator and milling men, and the rail
roads, has culminated in open warfare.
Hon. C. A. Hutchings, one of the at
torneys for the grain men, has filed in
the circuit court of the United States,
two bill in equity, one against the Santa
Fe, and the other against the Missouri
Pacific company, charging flagrant
violation of the interstate commerce
act, and asking for an injunction and
other relief. The bills are brought in
behalf of about fifty corporations and
co-partnerships engaged in the grain,
and milling business in Kansas City,
Kan. It is claimed that Kansas City is i
unjustly being discriminated against,
and subject to undue and unreasonable
precedent, and advantage is given to
Chicago, St. Louis and other Eastern
markets.
HONORED DR. NANSEN.
The Arctic Exp'erer Enthusiastically
Welcomed at Christiana.
CHRISTIANA, Sept. 11.—The arrival
here of the Fram, having on board Dr.
Nansen and the companions of his Arc
tic expedition, was made the occasion
of an extraordinary demonstration of
welcome. The Fram was escorted up
the fiord by a naval squadron of 70
steamers. The city was gaily decorated
and everything possible was done to ex
press the honor in which the citizens
held the returning'explorer. Great en
thusiasm was manifested. Among
those who took part in the demonstra
tion were 12,000 members of the guilds,
many studeuts, etc. They formed a
guard of honor along the route leading
to the castle, where Nansen was cor
dially welcomed. Here a banquet was
tendered to him and he was decorated
by the king and by the crown prince.
RIVAL SCHOOLMASTERS.
A Lively Row Among Factions at Madl'
son Lake, Minn.—Five Arrests.
MANKATO, Minn., Sept. 11.—Almost
every inhabitant of the village of Mad
ison Lake, this county, is arrayed on
one side or the other of a school tight,
and five arrests on the charge of riot
have resulted. At the school election
the issue was over the retention of A.
A. Campbell, the principal. His op
ponents triumphed, but the old boarc'i
hastened to engage Campbell for an
other year before their terms of office
expired. When the new board came in
it disregarded this election and con
tracted with Joseph Davis of Madelia.
When the two principals each tried to
control the school the result was A row,
and the arrests followed.
Liabilities Monat Up.
CKNTERVILLE, S. D.. Sept. U. —The
affairs of the defunct Centerville bank
are in the hands of John Turnbull, re
ceiver. The liabilities, instead of $4,000
are now placed at $14,000. The bank's
assets consist of some land and a good
deal of paper. The creditors are not
alarmed over their losses, although
they do not expect to recover much
more than 60 per cent.
Sewer Pipe Men Combine.
PITTSBUKO, Sept 11.—The sewer pipe
manufacturers of the country are in
session here for the purpose of forming
a combine or pool There was formerly
an organization of sewer pipe manufac
turers similar to the one proposed, but
about three months' dissensions caused
disruption.
Had Coflbi to fit.
WONOWOC, Wis., Sept. 11.—Charles
Kingsley, one of the oldest residents of
living in the town of Sum
mit, is dead. He ha|d a coffin made for
himself a few weeks ago knowing that
tfae end
this county
was Mir.
ESTABLISHED 1890. MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 189(i PRICE FIVE CENTS
Something Ne
at C. A. KELLEY'S
in White ware^j Lamps, and
Glassware.
CHOICE GROCERIES AND
Call and see me,
For me leil 30 Days.
0 0®
Suits,
Pants,
Overcoats,
T. T.
Hum!
i!ii!
llHIillii
CYCL0NE AT PARIS
The French Capital Visited by
a Very Severe Wind
Storm.
Portion of the Roof of the
Palais tie Justice Blown
Away.
Omnibuses,Cabs and Street Stands
Overturned, and Many Per
sons Hurt.
PARIS, Sept. 11.—A violent cyclone
•wept over portions of this city at 2:80
p. m. Omnibusses, cabs and stalls in
the streets were overturned, trees were
blown down store windows were
broken barges were sunk in the river
Seine and the firemen had to be called
out. Many persons were injured on
the Rue Turbigo, Place de la Repub
lique, the Place St. Sulpice and the
Boulevard St. Martin.
The greatest damage was done at the
Palais de Justice. All the Windows on
the Rue de Harley side were smashed,
part of the roof was blown away and
the corridors were filled with clouds of
dust and branches of trees. The sitiings
of the court had to be suspended. The
court yard of St. Cliappelle was fUled
with every sort of debris.
NEW ENGLAND'S NORTHEASTER
Considerable Damage to .Shipping, and
Serious Injury to Fruit Trees.
BOSTON, Sept. 11.—The northeast
storm which swept the New England
coast lias not passed, although the force
is somewhat less. The wind comes in
heavy gusts. The rain does not cease,
and the observer at the signal station
says it may not clear before night. Con
siderable damage has been done along
the water front by the combined action
of the heavy rain and the unusually
high tide which prevailed. Many cel
lars were flooded and wharves and low
lying streets were swamped. Aside from
this not much damage was done here.
Reports from New England coast cities
indicate that considerable damage has
been done to shipping, but news of dis
asters will probably not be received for
a day or two.
From inland points come stories of
much damage to crops and fruit trees.
The latter suffered most severely on
account of the hurh wind Ihedamcfce.
in this respect will be quite hevfy,, ws•
Packcts Stop Running.
BURLINUTOX, la.. Sept. 11 —The Mis
sissippi river is only four inches above
the lowest known stage. In conse
quence of nuniberous sandbars steamer
traffic is almost suspended. All thS
larger packets have ceased running.
Oo!d Reserve Gainn.
WASHINGTON. Sept. 11.—The treasury
lost $110,600 in gold Wednesday, which
leaver the true iuaount of gold reserve,
including.reported dep^iti in exchange
ESH FRUIT.
C. A. KELLEY.
These prices are for home
made tailor work. Satis
faction guaranteed.
$16 up
$4 up.
$18 up.
THE TAILOR.
LATEST MARKET REPORT.
"y
Milwaukee Grain.
MILWAUKEE, Sjpt. 10, 1898.
FLO I* R—Steady.
.WHEAT—No. 1 Northern. 66c De-|
Cfcmlx .", 58^0,
OATS No. 2 white. If? Ifb. $1
White, 15'^'a 19c.
BARLEY—No. 8, 31c, sample
track, [email protected]^lc.
bulutii Grain.
DCLUTH, Sept 10,1893b
WHEAT—Cash No. 1 hard 58o
No. 1 Northern, o'if'iofl^'e No. 2 Northern,
54 d54^c No. 3 spring, 519£a52%c re
jected, 45^ (i 51 to arrive, No. 1 hard,
bao-. No. 1 Northern. 66 *c September
No. 1 Northern. 56 c.
Minneapolis Gr-Un.
MINNEAPOLIS,
St. Paul Union Stockyards.
SOUTH ST. PAI L, Sept. 10,1890.
HOCK—Market steady. Light receipts.
Range of prices, a-i. 10.
CATTLE- Rt
ceiptrt of cattle not so I
large as yesterday and demand fair for
goo stuff. Good demand for good stock-1
ers and feeders.
SHEEP —Market very dull. Lamb
market demoralized.
Receipts: Hogs, 200 cuttle, 160, sheep,
450 calves, 3.
Chicago In ion Stock Yards.
CHICAGO. Sept. 10,1896.
-HOOS—Market active and strong.
Sales ranged at $-i.5t0 id.40 for light
fcM*@3.36 for mixed fci.50(a3. i0 for heavy
JiV.'O(a2.05 for rough.
CATTLE—Market slow but steady
Salos ranged at $3.10fo&.0~> for beeves
fl [email protected] for cows and heifers |J2.40(a
15 for Texas steers $2.60 a4.U0 for West
ern steers.
r-HEEP—Market dull and unevenly
lower.
lteceipts—Hogs. 25,00'i cattle. 13,000
kheefc MJ,000
Chicago Grain and Provision#.
CHICAGO, Sept. 10 1S9&
Cl.OalN.. l'KIU.vfc.
WHEAT September, 56i85tt
)'Oi«K September. October,
I5.TV/§ JANUARY TJT.TTTVF.
Awarded
Highest Honors—World's Fair.
•DR'
CREAM
BAKING
PWMR
MOST
PERFECT MADE.
A pore Grape Cresm of Tartar Powder. Fre*
'*om Ammonia, Alum or any other adulterant
'.40
YCAIS
the Standard.
CHAS. 6. KENNEDY,
Presiden
Sept. 10, 1880.
WHEAT—September closed 53^0, De-1
cember, 659io. On Track No. 1 hard,
66 ic No. 1 Northern. 54%? No. 2 North
ern, 54K&
Fa rm
Fall Trade.
STEEL RANGES,
COOKING STOVES,
DR. F. N.'PA.LMER,
DENTAL SURGEON
Offioe'over Citizen* National.Bank.
MADISON,
.THE.-.
LAKE COUNTY
WEEKLY LEADER
A carefully edited,
-40
CK toojr, otSy^e lA-ceaibc'r,
May. iCS^c.
COitN September, Oetober,
iWUo: December. 21 May. Mc.
OATS—September, lolifnOeto
ber, loHc boc
ember, W^daltt^e May,
ALL PRINTED
at ^lome,
Sent to any address in
the United States, lot
ONE- DOLLAR
HEATING STOVES.
McDONALD BROS,
fladison, S.
A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
SOUTH DAKOTA.
BUBSORIBB
FOR
•••1
J. H. WILLIAMSON
Vice President.
THE HADISON
State Bank,
D.
Loans &*t LoW^st
«*RATES^
MKAT MAIKhT
Citv Meat Market.
Keeps constantly on h&n 1 a
line of
all
Fresh and Cured Meats,
Fish, Fowl and Game,ic sea on.
60ETHFL& SCHULfZ.
BY YOUR
FLOUR AND FEED,
Wood. Gasoline and Kero
sene of the Feed Store.
WE HANDLE
and
48-column paper
Madison, Howard
White tlonr.
FRANK J. FOX.
J. JONES
Real Estate, Loans
AND
Correspondence
Solicited.
Office in Syndicate Block.
Madison, Sal

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