OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, April 09, 1900, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1900-04-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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IMWill
Have You Seen Our
Elegant Line of
—CARPETS—
Rugs, Curtains,
Couch Covers.
I If not, come now and maks your
selections as we will not have the entire
1 line ior you to select from but a few days
longer.
We oan please you in price and
quality.
i florse & Munro.
iHE DAILY LEADER.
MONDAY. APRIL 9, 11*10.
IfFICIIlL PflPEB OF COT AND COUNTY.
TBKMB OP SUBBCR1FTION
BT mail, 1 vesr .$4.00
By mail, »i month-! 2.*
By mail. 3 month#
City Election, April If,
For Mayor—
SID. LEE, Third ward.
L. A. STEVENS, Fourth ward.
For School Treasurer—
JOS. OP
PERU D.
For Members Bottrd of Education—
1
1
Bv mail, 1 month
Sf eafftor, per week 10
J. F. STAI1L. Proprietor.
1900.
H. P. SMITH.
For City Jueiice—
J. H. W ILLIAM90X.
Police ustice—
D. D. HOLDKI-GE.
Treasurer—
J. A. JOHNSON.
For Aldermen—
H. B. WILLIAMSON*. First ward.
GEO. E. COCHRANE. Second ward,
C. A. NICHOLS, First ward.
J. J. FITZGERALD, Second ward.
ED. WESTHY, Third ward.
TEL'EK MAROT.'AKT. Fourth ward.
The inalienable lit of petition is the
first and last recourse of the American
oiti'.en, aod i, is still fortunate that its
privilege has not been abridged by the
scheming manipulator of city politics.
While all the ordinary nrichinery of
party operations may he gobbled up by
the partizan or ward heeler and thema*
jority of the people cheated out of any
expression or representation in conven
tion, even to the turning over to the op
position the results of the entire party
machinery, as
WHS drne UI
this city last
week, yet, the humblest of our citizen
ship though thn-» deprived of the ordin­|
ary method" of e*pre«sing themselves,
oan get before the people in an appeal
by petition. And to this metLod a large
portion, we may safely say a majority,
of our citizens have had to resort to get
a candidate representing their idea of a
man tit for the important office of mayor
bjfore the people. A petition largely
signed, nominating the Hon. H. P.
Smith for the office of mayor is in hand
and will be tiled in due time.
Ordinarily, where different convec
tions representing different id«as and
issues in government are held, these dif
fering issues are represented by candi
dates standing distinctly upon these is
sues—the people take their choice and
the policy of the administration is thus
mapped out. Common decency in pro
litical methods, honesty in adminiBtra
tion, and the preservation of the rights
of the people to a free choice in who
shall rule over them, demand this. But
these rights of the people of this city
were ruthlessly ignored by the few,
working for personal ends, who stacked
the conventions last week, both of
which nominated the same man, C. J.
Porter, for mayor. It required a good
deal of gall and politioal chioanery to
thua secure the nomination of Mr. Por*
ter and pretend to say that so small a
man on general principles should repre
sent all that was desirable in administra
tion by all or even more than half the
people of this city. Such an assumption
bodes no good for the future govern
ment of the city should such parties se
oure control of it, and it oould only be
expected that they would exercise the
same selfish interest for themselves that
they have done in their manipulation of
the conventions. The interests of the
people would not be "la it."
The people of Madison desire in their
WIBIIIMWIIIBBil:
I
executive chair an up-right man, public
spirited and of good business ability.
Such a man they recognize in Hon. II.
P. Smith. In nominating Mr. Smith,
the business men of the city and those
looking for an impartial, able and clean
administration of oity affairs have done
wisely. The coming year, for instance,
in Madison promises to be one of un
usual opportunity and activity, and a
man is needed at the bead of city affairs
who has business sagacity enough to
know a good proposition when he seee it,
and has public spirit enough to meet it
half way and welcome it. Such a mau
Mr. Smith has
shown himself to be in all
the affairs of his life. He showed it
•*hen a young man in the distinction he
attained as an officer in the army he has
shown it in the management of his own
business affairs and farming operations
in this county he has shown it in the
self-sacrificing manner in which he has
handled the Lake Madison hautauqua
affairs. His predecessors bad performed
heroio work in organizing and tiding the
association over a number of adverse
years, during the money stringency in
the state and nation, and relinquished it
to him last year when yet the greatest
of business tact and economy was neces
to continue it in existence. Mr. Smith,
as president of the institution, at much
expense of time, labor and worry to him
self, piloted his first assembly through
safely and profitably. lie recognized in
the Chautauqua an institution that if
made a success would be not only an
educating influence to this city but
would be a credit to its social fame and
and an advertisement abrond. It is only
an instance of what a man of Mr.
Smith's ability miy have opportunity to
do for Madison in some other way
should he be entrusted with its execu
tive office. It is worthy of note in this
connection that while he was doing all
he could to make the Chautauqua a
credit to Madison from its inceptkn,
those who now seek the chief places in
the city were doing what they oould to
injure it.
Locally, Mr. Smith is deeply hsterest
i ed in the growth and prosperity of Mac!
ison, standing high in its social circles,
and a heavy taxpayer besides. He has
shown a deep interest in t^e success of
our State Normal school, and whatever
is for the social, material or educational
upbuilding of Madisou, Mr. Smith is
always strictly identified with it.
Madison could do herself no more fit
ting honor thau to elect H. P. Smith
major. And she could hardly place
herself in a more insignificant and hu
miliating position before the state than
to endorse the candidacy, under the
present conditions, of his opponent.
The census enumerators who will en
ter upon their duties June 1, will be re
quired to wear badges as a distinguish
ing mark. The oontraot for the (X),000
badges that will be required has already
been given out, and they will be com
pleted by June 1. These badges will
be made of German silver, an inoh long
and five-eights of an inoh wide. The
shape is that of a shield, Burmounted by
an eagle, and aoross the face of the
shield will be the words: "United
States oensus, 1900."
s
Washington dispatohes state that 150
insane soldiers are now confined at St.
Elizabeth insane asylum, many of whom
will never recover their minds. They
came to the asylum wrecked physioally
as well as mentally. An increased run
of such cases may soon be expected as
the rainy season sets in in the Philip,
pines. Otis' dispatohes of only two days
ago read as follows: Soldiers who have
become insane 25, suicide I, died from
wounds in action 3, died of disease 18,
drowned 2, accidentally rhot 2. Officials
insist that this is alow death rate. Ao
oording to official records there hi Y)
been in the past two years 88 suioidss in
the armiee of the United Statee, nearly
every one due to insanity. During the
same period nearly one thousand «oldiers
have been shipped from the various
army poets in Hawaii, Porto Rico, Cuba
and the Philippines to the miliary in
sane asylum at Washington, Q0 per cent
of whom enme from the Philippines.
Such is the terrible effect of tropical
heat, marches and exhaustion to which
our soldiers are exposed in running
down the Hen-like Filipino. We do not
believe that country is worth the sacri
fice to lis, yet it is a good and a rich
country for the Filipino. lie ought to
be allowed to rule it and be protected in
his rights.
The Hughes county commissi##*!* ni
Pierre appropriated 8500 to ass
iet in
erecting the Children'* Home at Sioux
Falls. Deuel county did likewise* last
week*
Dell Rapids is taking steps to secure
the meeting of the Luke Madison Veter
an's association at that place next June.
The small pox scare at Vermillion hat*
abated, it not proving the genuine article.
We can s:tve you money on a piano or
organ. Call at our store west of the
postollice aud be convinced.
BF.NSON «FC OOULD.
Por sal#, all my household gool
nearly new. Will sell cheap as I am gn
ing to leave Madisou.
HARVEY MILLKH.
Wm. Orr, Newark, O., says, "We
never feel safe without One Minute
Cough Cure in the house. It saved my
little ooy's life when he had the pneu
monia. We think it is the best medi
cine made." It cures coughs and til!
lung diseases. Pleasant to take, harm
lese and gives' immediate results.
COOK & ODEK.
Por Male.
Five and ten acre lots, on long time.
Small first payments to people who winh
to build. J. A. SHIMERDA.
To seeute the original witoh haze]
salve, ask for DeWitt'o Witoh Haz*l
Salve, well known as a certain cure'
piles and skin diseases, lie ware
for
of
worthless counterfeits. They are
dangerous.
COOK & ODEB
Becomes National Treasurer.
CHICAGO, April 9.—Millard Fillmore
Dunlap of Jacksonville, Ills., treasurer
of the Democratic state committee, has
been appointed treasurer of the national
Democratic committee. The selection
•was made by Senator Jones, chairman
of the Democratic national organiza
tion. Mr. Dunlap takes the place of
J. L. Norris of Washington, D. C., who
was recently elected a member of the
national committee representing the
District of Columbia.
To Knmiierate Chinamen.
WASHINGTON, April —In order to
secure a satisfactory enumeration of the
Chinese population of this country the
census bureau has procured a proclama
tion printed in Chinese characters and
bearing the official seals of Chinese con
sular officers at San Francisco and New
York in which the Chinese regents of
the United States are directed to make
proper replies to questions put to tfetom
by enumerators.
Cicrman Flag ItaUed Over Samoa.
CmcAiio,
April
it.—A
special to The
Record from Apia, Samoa, dated March
17, says: The imperial German flag
was raised and undisputed German rule
over the islands of Upolu, Manono,
Apolima and Davy began on March 1.
The ceremony took place at Mulintt, in
front of the governor's house. Fully
5,000 native Samoans, besides nearly all
the foreign residents were present.
Confederate Memorial Day Obwrved,
NEW ORLEANS, April {•.—The various
Confederate camps celebrated Memorial
or Decoration day, which is a legal
holiday in Louisiana. The militia, Sons
of Veterans and the various committees
of Confederate ladies' organizations
participated. Tombs and statues of
Confederate memory were decorated
with flowers and memorial aervices
were held at the cemeteries.
Gas and Klentric Companies AIxorbed.
CHICAGO, April 9.—The Ogdcn Gas
company has jtassed into the hands of
the People's Gas Light and Coke com
pany. The price paid was $«i,000,009.
The plant and franchise of the Cosmo
politan Electric company is also said to
be included in the transfer.
Strike Threatened at Hoimton.
HOUSTON, Tex., April !».—The build­
ing trades council has resolved to order
a strike soon if the Building Exchange
does not accede to the demands of the
tarpeuters. About 50!) men will go out
and work on every building now oader
way will be stopied.
Killed by Hi* Hvpnon.
MOUNT VEKNON, Ills., April 9.—
George W. Roberts, a prominent farm
er of this vicinity was killed by his
stepson, Hardy Hughey. The muse for
the killing is anknown. Hughey is
under arrest.
Lewis Aokerman. Goehen, Ind., says:
"DeWitt's Little Early Risers always
bring certain relief, cure my headache
and never gripe." They gently cleanse
and invigorate the bowels and liver.
COOK &
Ooxc.
Citj esideace lots for «mh, 815 totfOO
ELMER SHERIDA*.
Rev. W. E. Stitzer, W. Canton, N. Y.
writes, "I had dyspepsia ov«r twenty
years, and tried dootors and medioinefi
without jenefit. I was persuaded to
use Kodol Dyspepsia Oure and it helped
me from the start. I believe it to be a
panacea for all forms of indigestion." II
digests what jou eat.
CooK&Oma*
Harper Whiskey is liquid tnusio, hot*
tied poetry, rips mellow, refreshing and
delicious. Sold by FRED KURTH,
Madison, & 0.,
S" N 'N
M. B. Smith, Butternut, Mich., Jsays,
DeWitt's Little Early Risers are the
very best pills ever used for costiveness,
liver snd bowel troubles.
COOK & ODER.
Running sores, ulcers, boils, pimples,
etc quickly cured by Banner Salve, the
most healing salve in the world. No other
"just as good,"
CHRIS. SCHCTZ.
list gour
Coal
III me Me EMir.
Wm. Fintzel, Agt.
u-
gjSMli.iawiiaiiMH«n«in*ittiiA«aiadB«Camaaeaaann
Heal Estate,
loans i
1
*.:•
A. I Sell
awmsaai rnmmmammmmKyrWimmu
W. M. JONES
will contract for all kinds of
STONE WORK,
PLASTERING
BRICK LAYING
All work guaranteed strictly First
class. Leave orders at J. J.
Fitzgerald's store.
CITY
MEAT MARKET,
JOHN 8CHULTZ Proprietor.
Keep constantly on hand full
line of
tost tird nam
Fish,
fowl and Game in season,
arena*.
Shirt Waists
...SKIRTS...
The largest line of Shirt
Waists and Skirts ever
shown iit Madison now
on sale at
J. J. FITZGERALD
T'-T
w
COME IN
AND SEE
FOR $16.00,
..gwj&IS
u.
Good Paint Econom
MEANS
BUYING GOOD PAIN'
The Paint that wears longest—that never disappoj
No buyer can afford to invest money in unsatisfactory
just bt cause the dealer can name a little lower price,
manent results and good economy go only with the
chase of most reliable paint.
MONARCH PAINT
faa« Hie widest reputation for longest service—greatest
ering capacity—most durable lustre. When y.
this well known brand you've the best paiut that mmev
buy—that the big, wide world eau produce, ami
you pay are really no higher than you've often k
inferior goods. Ask for color card.
-v-
COOK & 0D
^atiBHgaHEiiiautiiti Mtsiaimirnasisaiimniy ifWR Mtr rraaiTBiiirir^tj^yyy^ipK 5^^-.
Palace Meat flarket.
Fresh & Salt Meat
Cured Hams $\
Sausage & Fish
Orders promptly delivered t© any part of th»|
city. Call and try us.
he
J. P. NISSEN.
Uiu. B. KBHMEIHI J. H.Ws
Vice Presifesfc
THE nADISON
State Ban
Hadison, S. D.
A 6EKERAL BiNKINO BUSINESS TRASS*'
Farm Loans tt Lo*P
"••RATES'**
JIM
REOAJ
SPRINNQ SUI
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