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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 27, 1902, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1902-08-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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OFFER REJECTED
CHICAGO STREET CAR EMPLOYE!
VOTE TO REFUSE THE COM*
PANY'S OVERTURE*.
RADICALS IN THE MAJORITY
Three Thousand Mtn Participate In
the Balloting and the Opponents of
the Compromise Carry the Day by
Nearly Ten to One—National Pres­
ident of the Street Car Mtn Ulei
His Influence to Avert a Strike.
Chicago, Aug. 27.—Grave possibil
ities of a strike that may tie up all the
street railway lines of the West and
North Sides of this city confront the
officials of the Union Traction com
pany, By an overwhelming vote the
tijeal union of the Amalgamated Asso
ciation of Street Car Employes refused
to accept the proposition made by
President Roach several days ago.
The overture of the company, which
Includes an increase of 1 cent an hour
ta wages, the dissolution of a ri* al
employes' association and the employ
ment of noue but union men. was bal
lotted on by nearly 3.000 men. The
votes were counted later and although
no public statement of the vote was
made it was understood that the rad
ical men carried the referendum
•gainst the company by nearly ten to
one. An agreement between the union
•lid the railway company exists where
fey disagreements shall be settled by ar
bitration. William Mahon. interna
tional president of the street car men,
tried to exert his influence to avert
any strike action and to urge that the
onion live up to its laws. A rupture,
however, occurred between the local
officials and President Mahon ami he
left their meeting with a statement
that if the men struck without trying
at'biration the general union would not
support them in the issue.
DESPITE THE INJUNCTION.
Striking Linemen Continue to Cut Tel
ephone Wires.
New Orleans. Aug. 27.—As a result
of the linemen's strike, which has now
boon on for several weeks, the Cum
borland company is meeting with great
difficulty in operating its service here
ID spite of the blanket injunction re
cently issued by Judge Parlange in the
federal court. Tuesday the police re
ported that forty-eight wires belong
ing to the company at Pitt and Joseph
streets had been cut during the night
and the ends found lying on the
\Woana acuavlight. The effect was to
put many of the telephones in the up
per residence district of the city out
Of service.
The company is still bringing men
here from other points but has had to
appeal to the police to protect them.
Monday three of the men who came
from Nashville were badly beaten.
Later in the day the Cumberland
company, through Manager Powell, ap
plied to the mayor for permission to
arm their men.
TROOPS ON THE SCENE.
Possible Outbreak at Summit Hill, Pa.,
Averted.
Summit Hill, Pa.. Aug. 27.—Excite
ment prevails throughout the Panther
Creek district. At daybreak the strik
ers assembled to prevent nonunion
men from going to work. Anticipating
trouble Major Oearhart sent two com
panies of soldiers in trolley cars from
the camp in Manila park to this place
and their presence prevented a possi
ble outbreak.
Several nonunionists had been at
tacked and the town was in a turmoil.
The soldiers escorted the workmen
th rough the mob that had collected
and placed them in safety on the cars
which carried them to their work.
ALL WORKERS TURNED BACK
Strikers' Pickets at Hazleton, Pa., on
the Alert.
Hazleton, Pa., Aug. 27.—Suspecting
ttiat another attempt would be made to
ffsume operations at the No. 40 col
llery of the Lehigh Valley Coal com
pany many strikers' pickets were sta
tioned along all of the approaches to
the mine. Most of the nonunionists
who attempted to reach the colliery
were turned back, but no serious trou
ble occurred.
Three strikers who are alleged to
have participated in Monday's riot at
No. 40 colliery are under arrest. Other
arrests are expected.
FORCED TO THEIR CELLS*
Jailer's Wife Prevents Escape of Nine
teen Prisoners.
Covington, Tenn., Aug. 27.—Nine
teen prisoners in the county jail here
made an attempt to break out in the
absence of the Jailer and nearly suc
ceeded. They had bored through the
top of the cagc and were about to
break through the roof when the wife
of Jailer Smith took a hand. She
armed a negro "trusty" and taking her
husi and's shotgun covered the prison
ers and kept them still until her hus
band's return. The prisoners were
then forced to return to their cells.
IN RECEIVER'S HANDS.
Culver Lumber Company of Kansas
City in Trouble.
Kansas City, Aug. 27.—The Culver
Lumber company, successors to the
Kansas City Southern Lumber com
pany, owning extensive timber forests
at Craighead, Okla., with lumber yards
in Kansas City, Mo., and a sash, door
and box factory at Kansas City, Kan.,
was placed in receiver's hands during
the day, on the application of H. A.
Culver, the company's manager. As
sets are estimated at $650,000 and lia
bilities at $250,900.
DBES5 OF THE DAY.
FASHION 18 FLORAU.Y MINDED AND
THE ROSE REIGNS.
Sjll Ore* Flower Po*l|ins—'Tiny Kni
plre Wreaths of rhiffon Roses.
Muslin, Voile nml Foula*d—Tl»**
Artist's Touch In lints.
Roses are everywhere, for the latest
muslin gowns display rose wreathed
patterns, while lmts are rose laden,
ftnd on parasols are roses painted and
embroidered. These and other tlew oi ed
muslins suit very happily in tlie fash
ioning of the simple gown, being so
ornate themselves they need little dee
oration. A couple of frills on the hem
of the skirt and a frilled fichu on the
bodice TVill suffice to achieve good re­
FlUX'K OF HEX) AND WHITE FOt'LARD.
suits. Under such circumstances they
are only suited to young girls of slim
figure. Tiny empire wreaths of roses,
made of chiffon in natural colors, are
sometimes scattered over a pure white
mousseline de soie or chiffon skirt,
which has no other trimming than the
underpropping of frou frou frills at
the feet.
Besides the popularity of muslin, can
vas is also well liked and is seen at its
best in an ecru tone, trimmed with
little pipings or strappings of self col
ored silk, with a vest of Irish lace and
a suggestion of pale blue or pale
mauve at the neck.
There is a large choice of fabrics
Just now, for foulard is by no means
neglected even with such serious rivals
to combat as the voile an 1 the njuxlin.
and foulard dresses, usually bearing
dark grounds and light patterns, are
selected as being eminently suitable
for every occasion and easily ren
dered specially elegant by applications
of lace or a lawn embroidered collar
and undersleeves.
The double sleeve and its later com
rade for the season, the elbow sleeve,
hold favor In their line.
For the croquet player there is a
costume of ntl and white foulard trim
med with insertion and bordered with
red. With this may be worn a muslin
hat wreath* with roses.
In the pretty hat sketched one sees
a new style in straw, without doubt
A NEW SHAI'E OF HAT.
Inspired by oriental modes. It tarns
well down over the face and is very
daintily trimmed. In headgear con
trast seems to be permissible there is
often a touch of grass green beside a
bunch of La France roses, and sky
blue would seem to be almost a nec
essary accompaniment of a pink rose
trimmed straw hat.
The more artistic the hat the more
we owe to the art of the milliner, who
with a few yards of straw shapes the
exact form she desires. A touch of
black against the pink roses arid soft
cloudy loops of tulle gives the artist's
touch.
Silky straws in bold mixtures of blue
and green tartan, marquise bats in
coarse, soft straw, with bunches of
flowers and foliage enwreathed at the
back, are well adapted to the young.
Popular Shirt WalNt Material*.
Scotch madras and Scotch cheviots,
white piques and white dimities, dot
ted and embroidered svviss, mercerized
cheviot, white butcher's linen, liuen
lawn, fancy white cotton and wash
silks appear among popular shirt waist
materials.
Price of Bottles Raised
Chicago. Aug. rii**^
will bo
raised from 10
gross. This statement
Turner, president of the Western
Green Glass llottle association, which
has been in session in Chicago ami
which authorized the advance. lie
said the cause of the raise was the in
creased cost ot' production, due to tin
advance in the price of both labor am!
materials.
Montana Miners Killed.
Butte. Mont.. AUK. 2T.-Wor.L HAS
been rwriv.-tl in this itV of the .U a
of Kreg Sample and I homa* YVhit
comb two miners, in the properties ol
the Great Northern Mining company at
Gilt Kdge. Mont. The mine compres
*or exploded and the two men were
suffocated. Two others had narrow
escapes and were rescued in an uncou
scious condition.
JOURNEY FOR SENATORS.
Commission Sails for Hawaii to Inves
tigate Needs of Island.
Pan Francisco. Aug. 27—Senator
Mitchell of Oregon and his fellow
members of the senate Hawaii com
mission sailed during the day on the
City of Peking for Honolulu.
The commission purposes to spend
a month or more in the islands in or
der to make a thorough investigation
of the industrial and other eonditi
with a view to ascertaining the islan I
needs in the way of future legislation.
BRIEF BITS OF NEWS.
The National Associations of Post
masters is in session at Milwaukee.
Edward K. Pitman, one of the best
known Democratic politicians in
Southern Iowa, is dead at his home at
Mount Ayr from a kick by a horse.
Robert H. Van Schaack. treasurer
of the Holland Society of Chicago, ha
arrived at The Hague to visit forme
President Kruger and the Boer gener
als.
Peter S. Hoe. the la«t surviving
member of the original firm of
!Ioe Co.. manufacturers of printing
presses, is dead at Upper Montclaire
N. J., from heart failure.
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis. Auc. 20.—Wheat
S e t.. Cit'.-v. e Dec.. i 4c. On Track
No. 1 hard. 78c No. 1 Northern. 7»lc
No. 2 Northern. 72% 73-%c.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City. Ia.. Aug. 2»1.—Cattle—
Beeves. cows, bulls and
mixed. $2."otfJ 4.2" stockers and f»
crs. |2.75f/ ".nn yearlinss and calv
$2.5055 4.2.". Hogs—$7.10® 7.3*.
Duluth Grain.
Duluth. Aug. 26.—Wheat—Cash. No.
1 hard. 74-HC NO. 1 Northern. 727.c
No. 2 Northern. 71 -\c: No. 3 spring.
To Arrive—No. 1 hard. 717sC
No. 1 Northern.
7»a*c
Chicago Grain and Provision?.
Chicago. Aug. 26.—Wheat—Sept..
71 Iec., C7l,-2c May.
Corn—Sept.. Oct., 51c I)ec..
43'sc Mav, 3f»r ^i"c. Oats—Aiu..
34V»c Sept.. Mr: I)ec„ Sfta^SOV:
May. 30«%\ Pork—Aug.. $16.Sm
Sept.. $16.S7J^ Oct.. $17.u0 Jan.,
$14.?'": May. $11.Co. Flax—Cash,
Northwestern, 11.47 Southwest :-i n.
|1.41 Sept.. X1.CS: fjct.. $1.33. Butter
—Creameries, lf»f# 18V|jc: dairies, 1l':
7Uc. Eu'k 17'ic. Poultry—Tur
keys, 12V.fi 13£c chickens. 1
12c.
ily gazed breathless at this strange
tragedy of the air. Then they went back
to the sick room to tell of the terrible
struggle for life they had just witnessed.
It did not occur to them that under their
very eyes a more terrible, more pathetic
struggle was going on daily.
There can be nothing more pitiful
that the struggle the consumptive
makes against disease. The greatest
help in this struggle is gained by the
use of Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Dis
covery. It cures obstinate coughs, weak
and bleeding lungs, emaciation, and
other ailments which If neglected or
unskillfully treated find a fatal termina
tion in consumption.
"In ivf, one
ot
CAUSC
bottles
to 15 nits n
was in ul» by
Sept..
Dec., Flax—Cash. $1.50.
St. rout Union Stock Yard*.
St. Paul. Aug. 2T..—Cattle—Choice
butcher steers. $G.tn'T/ 7.."": choice
butcher cows and heifers. 6.no
?ood to choice veals. $^.r"fz
Hozs—$7.2ntfr 7.ti". Sheep—Good to
choice, $3.2Tjfi 4.o lambs. $4..j'»1J j.2i
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago. Aug. 26.—Cattle—Good to
prime steers, f8.7." poor to me
dium.
$4.on7.20
stockers and f* ed
ers. $l.£of \".5" cows and hoi TS,
$1.5" Texas steers, $3.oief/
Hogs—Mixed and butchers. $7.1"'/
7.75 good to choice heavy. $7.55^
7.9o rough heavy. $« /.t5ft 7.5" linht
$7.1"^ 7.7 bulk of sab's. $7.35f/ 7.''
Sheep—Good to choice. $3.5"T/ i.t,0
lambs, $3.50® 6.00.
Pleasan
There was a cry in
the streets. People
rushed from their
doors and strained
their eyes on the
struggling balloonist
fighting for life.
Kven the poor, pant
ing 6ufferer in the
sick room was for
gotten while the fam­
my daughters wn» sufTerintj on
account of a severe tou^h, hectic fever, wasting
of flesh and other symptom* of diseased lun^s,"
writes Kev. Joseph 11. Fespertuau, of liarnun
hprmgs, Iredell Co., N. C. "I promptly XNVE
her Dt. R. V Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery
with gratifying buccess, and *he now enjoys
excellent health. This being true, I hereby
heartily endorse yoijr iticdirineu."
Accept no substitute for "Golden Med
ical Discovery." There is nothing "just
as good" for diseases of the stomach,
blood and lungs.
Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets assist the
action of the Discovery,"
mtm w..
TERROR-
ftEIGN
Drunken Harvesters Loot Restau
rants Along the Railway.
Winnipeg. Aug. 27.—
vesters who came from hastttn ai
odian provinces are fugitives from ju
tiee Two score or more who are
ly wanted by Canadian officers are
aid to be hiding somewhere near
international boundary. An arnicu
posse may possibly efTect a
bad
a! ,mr
While en route to Winnipeg the nar
esters rushed from the coaches at
every stopping place in a body an.
after quickly disposing of restaurant
keepers looted the establishments an«.
then tried to demolish them. 1 hoy
aused a reign of terror for a distant e
ol over 20.1 miles. Several restaurant
men are reported badly injured, (e
ting wind that they were "wante
the men hurriedly left the coach co
here and went south to the Dako':i
line.
IlviifiiCM cannot Currl
local applications, as they
mnot
reach the diseased poitin ,I*r•
I here is only one way to cure deainesp.
and that is "by constitutional remedies
IVafi.ess is caused by an intlatned cot:
lition of the mucous lining of the r-us
tachian Tube. When this tube gets in
flamed you have a rumbling sound «r
imperfect lowing, and when it is entireh
closed deafness is the result, and un
this imtlamination can be taken out and
this tube restored to its normal coin.it
hearing will be destroyed forevr
Nine cases out of ten are caused bv cat
arrh. which is uothing but an inflamed
ndition of the mucous surfaces.
We will give One Hundred Dollars foi
any case of Peafnesslcausi by catarrh
that connot be cured Hall s (. atai rh
Cure. Fend for circulars free.
F. ,1. C11 FATA a CO Toledo, O
Sold bv Druggists 7.V.
Hall's Family Pills are the InBt,
A Cure for KUIIIIIHTCo»»|»lnlitt.
Summer complaint unusually |^re
valent among children this season A
well developed casein the writer's'fain
tly was cured last week by tho time!)
use of Chamberlain's Colic. Cholera at,
and Diarrhoea lu uied} and of the be-
patent medicines manufactured an
which is always kept on hand at tin
home of e scribe. This is not mteiidei
as a freeputf for the company, who
not advertise with us, but to benefit
little sufferers who may not be withii
easy access of a physician. No famil)
should be without a bottle of this IU
M-ine in the house, espwiallj in sanune
time.—Lansing. Iowa, Journal, For sal
by All Druggists^
Hound kidneys are safeguards of 1 if
Make the kidneys healthy with Fole)'
Ki Inev ('nr.'.—Chris Shut*.
CONSTIPATION
"I have K 'ue 14 4*ya a'
•ovrnrut of tlM bowel*
11..':ii vitiopt bjr usliik I
Clir««:iit*' iiiistlpatloti for Bev
time without
it U'tii# ii Me
water InJ»'•
years i-Ui'iM me
tliU U-rrili'.o condition: dut n Unit time 1 (1M ev
erythuitf I iiuard of tul nt'Tct :ml ntiy rci ef. Mich
was :IIT aso until 1 bi'tfun u-.i ii I'AMAllI'. If
i\v Ii.iv(» fuai one to 1111oc u u tin ttm!
was rioli 1 would gUellUUC eu.'li movement
a such A relief-' A:MLI'I 1!'VT
IOc?.) Uus cil Si. l* ro.:, Mich.
CANOY
CATHARTIC
lent
N.-ver .-!•*••:. akon. i i •:., 1
CURE CONSTIPATION.
4l«rl!i| tUasd? lo«pa*r, Sostr»al, Us* tort
tjood
PUKE ASH .MELLOW
RICH AMD DELICAU
row SALE HY
HRICK HYLANI).
N'S fr^USH
SYkl
PILLS
It
Jl Ur.."'"s KnMby
(illKMMJAt. Ol).
Mtlnit «bl« r•l»er.
LOUIS MALONEY_jr^
S e
IH:AI.I2R IN
CHOICE WINES & LIQUORS
Clni"
LAND!
Fans Brewing Co.
Ave. ,th Street.
Good
Good
thow you just
Correspondence Solicited.
0. Sciiii
IW tsii's,
Is the Basisof All Wealth
and the den,and for Lake County farms I* Increasing
Ii vou
are
in search of a
where *ou can raise Wheat. Cats. Earley.Corn, Flax, Potatoes,
in fact everything adapted to this latitude, and
wh.orG you can sucocssiullv carrv on
as
Dairying &
Stock Raising,
and where your family •will have the advantages ol
Chas. B. Kennedy,
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA.
•m
Year
a Good Climate
Good Society,
Schools,
Church Facilities.
then come and see me, and I w ill show you Just what you want. If yon
are renting land now. paying $3 to
5s
per acre annual rental, I uili
good land and sell it to you at w hat you
will pay out in rental, whert you are in three years,
and will give you easy term* of payment.
If you want a good location in Madi5on I have such for you. A large num»
ber of substantial buildings have been built in Hadison the past sea
son and the city is steadily grow irg in population.
i-x
,rdcr lhe
u.*.e ,n.
Pr
sotny ff
v
[Machine
The human body it like a delicafcly ad|uated mich nr
.1# P81"1 *'orn out, or through abuM becomet
ects the whole system. The kidncya and liter are am*"1*
most important of all the organs in the body. When lhf
entire »y§tem suffers,
•monthly and Rood health follows.
keep
will regulate thete organs and keep them ifl
'houaands of families have prove
"Mf'" .irMiir,5riK, JTii'S
if I«Uri uk
achc# your
ru,,vv'
1
*y.
Ke
eep the®
McLeanV Lfoer
and Kidney *Balm
tunnel
rfeel
hct®
aches
It bltion If you sre saslljr flrsd sfld •JJJl- ,t
vl».?r
you^ kldney» ,f*
of order. Buy s bo«l*
druggist s. It may save you useless sulferini'
i Mad* by
McLtan Medicine Cm.* St. Leu"-
m, "*t n M..
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