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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 17, 1903, Image 4

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1903-11-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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TWENTY CARS IN OPERATION.
targe Forct of Folic* Protects Non.
union Crews.
Chicago. Nov. 17.—With at official
Announcement by railway officiate that
Its Wentwortb Avenue line would be
Operated on a regular service sched
ule the movement of cars was re
lumed during thi day. The police, in
force, were manaed about the barns,
While a detail of patrolmen rode upon
fvery car as heretofore.
At intervals of five minutes cars
frft the Seventy-ninth street barns un
til twenty cars were en route for the
kuslnesH district.
Superintendent Weatherwax of the
Viailway company declared he was pre
pared to operate as many cars during
the day as the city could afford police
protection for. Reports to the effect
that union men were going over to the
Company and deserting the organiza
tion are declared by both President M.
C. Buckley and Secretary L. I). Rland
the union to be falsehoods.
The company started two boilers at
the Fifty-second -and State street pow
•rhoiiHe during the day, where twenty
Oominionigts have been quartered as
though in a hotel. At the State street
powerhouse fifteen men had been sim
ilarly installed to take the places of
those who have quit.
Serious delay occurred at Van Buren
•treet, where a union crew In charge
of a car of the Union Traction com
pany stopped In the path of the strike
ridden company's cars. Teams quick
ly packed around the cars and a shout
teg mob surrounded all. The block
ade lasted half an hour.
Linemen, dynamo tenders and re
pair men have been called out on
Strike in Rupport of the carmen.
The company has Absolutely refused
to arbitrate differences.
YOUNG WOMAN MURDERED.
Body
Found Mutilated and Partially
Burled.
Peoria. 111., Nov. 17.—A message
Just received announces that Miss
May Henneger, a prominent young
woman of Hishop, who was supposed
to have eloped, was found murdered
la a pasture near her home. Her body
Was mutilated and half buried.
Miss Henneger accompanied Fred
Struhble, a neighbor's son, to a supper
and social given at the country school
liouse, a short distance from the girl's
home, Saturday evening. When she
failed to return her parents were
greatly alarmed, but as neither she
nor St rubble could be found it was
aupposed they had eloped and would
fee beard from In a few days. The dis
covery of the girl's remains aroused
the community, but all efforts of the
authorities to locate Strubhle's where
abouts have proved unavailing. The
condition of the body indicated a dea
perate struggle. The girl was the
daughter of Newton Henneger, a
prominent farmer.
SHORT IN
I
HIS
ACCOUNTS.
€aahier of Portsmouth (Va.) Savings
Bank Missing.
Portsmouth. Va.. Nov. 17.—John H.
Dpwnlng, cashier or the Portsmouth
Wine Savings bank, Is missing and
the board of directors of the institu
tion are in possession of his confes
sion to defalcations extending over a
comparatively recent period. There
Has been no run on the bank. Downing
was bonded by a Baltimore company
'fir $5,000.
The shortage was suspected two
Weeks ago and an investigation was
made. Downing was confronted with
the facts and acknowledged having
tttted the bank's money. It is under
itood that another outside party is
Implicated. Downing left the city a
Week ago, ostensibly to go to Suffolk
to raise funds with which to pay off
part of his indebtedness. He has not
been seen since he disappeared nor is
there any evidence that he went to
Suffolk at all.
FIRST JURY DISAGRESO.
S»cond Trial of Miller and Johns Be
gins ft Cincinnati.
Cincinnati, Nov. 17.—The second
trial of Daniel Voorhees Miller of
Tarre Haute, formerly assistant attor
ney In the post office department at
Washington, and his friend. Joseph M.
Johns, an attorney at Kockville. Ind.,
began during the day before United
States District Judge Albert C. Thomp
son. They are charged with con
spiracy to extort a bribe from John
J. Ryan, a turf commissioner with
offices at Cin&nnati and St. Ixuis. for
such decisions as would allow Ryan
to use ihe mails In receiving money
for "letting on races," At their first
trial here last
1900th
agreed.
CABBIES
-ilNidoit
the Jury dis­
GOVERNMENT OUT $200,000.
Alleged Frauds in Appraiser's Office at
Boston.
to
Boston, Nov. 17.—Special treasury
agents sent to Boston by Secretary
Shaw claim to have found evidences
akowloi that the government has been
mulcted in upward of 9200,000 through
collusion between persons employed in
the appraiser's department. At least
a score of Importing firms in Boston
ire said to be concerned in the affair.
Three men are now awaiting trial
by the government on charges of
smuggling, which the government offi
cials say has been going on for two
MAKE DEMANDS.
Strike of
Threatened With
Drivers.
New York, Nov. 17.—London Is
threatened with a general cab drivers'
strike owing to the competition of the
"tubes," omnibuses and electric cars.
atys a World dispatch from that city.
The cab drivers have ssked the own
ers for s reduction of a shilling a day
la the cost of hire. This has been re
fused and the "cabbies" have called a
||t«tins to vote on a atrike.
Killed a Friend by Mistalf^
Chicago, Nor. 17.—Dazed by mows
•truck by men who had insulted the
poung women he was escorting Ru
dolph Lsdwig drew a revolver and
fired two «Mis. Both struck Prank
Sspders. Ma friend aad companion.
who Also waa struggling with the
crowd, and Inflicted wounds from
which Saadara died two hours later.
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NEW YORK PRIEST ABOUCTED.
Had Been Active in Supressing
Vicious Resorts.
New York, Nov. 16,—Police reserves
we e called out early In the day and
are scout lug Williams bridge and
vicinity for the Rev. Joseph Cilring
ione. an Italian priest, who is believed
to have been abducted.
Father Cilrlngione left home last
Thursday evening in the custody of
two men who represented themselves
to be policemen and who asked him
to accompany (hem to the station. The
priest had received threatening let
ters because of his activity in sup
pressing vicious resorts among the
Italians and he was led to believe that
the person who had written the let
ters was under arrest. He had pre*
viously reported to the police
WIUL SOON N WELL.
Illness of German Emperor Again De
clared Not Serious.
Berlin, Nov. 16.—No bulletin re
garding the health of Emperor Wil
liam was issued during the day, but it
is said that his wound continues to
heal In a normal manner. The corre
spondent here of the Associated Press
learns officially that the emperor has
already begun to speak a little In a
low voice and that the irritation of the
vocal organs is diminishing.
The Berlin Clinical Wochenschreft
confirms the statement of the doctors
that the operation of Emperor Wil
liam was for a harmless polypus.
It is reported from Bonn that Prince
Henry of Prussia in a conversation
with Burgomaster Spiritus declared
that the illness of the emperor was not
at all serious. Were It so. Prince
Henry said, the emperor would have
revealed the truth to the people.
LEAVES FOR 8AN DOMINGO.
General Jiminez Will Attoupt |a
Force Blockade.
Cape Haytlen, Hayti, Nov. 16.—The
French steamer St. Simon, with Gen
eral Jiminez, head of the Dominican
revolution, on board, has left Port
au Prince, Haytl. with the intention,
according to report, of forcing the
blockade of Puerto Plata, on the
northern coast of Santo Domingo.
The liaytlan authorities formally
opposed the landing in Haytl of Gen
eral Jimincz in spite of his strong
Insistence on being permitted to do
so
It is said that if the St. Simon Is
Interfered with she will ask for the
assistance of the German cruiser
Gazelle or any other foreign warship
which may be in Dominican waters.
BANKS REFUSE CREDIT.
Wholesale Tobacco Dealers in New
York Forced to Go 8lowly.
New York, Nov. 1(1.—As an out com
of the failure of Sutter Bros., import
ers, packers and dealers in leaf to
bacco In Chicago and this city, the
wholesale tobacco district, embracing
several blocks in lower Manhattan,
has been excited by the refusal of
local banks and several out-of-town
institutions to extend them credit.
As a consequence business in the to
bacco district udclenlv experienced^
a great contraction, but no serious re
suits are yet apparent.
PASSENGER TRAIN
DERAILED.
a
captain
of the precinct that he had been anr
noyed by threatening letters ami wheil
the men called he accompanied them
willingly.
When the priest did not return
home that night or the next day his
housekeeper and friends became
alarmed and finally his disappearance
was reported.
DISPATCHER RESPONSIBLE
Coroner's Verdict in Recent Disaster
on the Big Four.
Indianapolis, Nov. 16.—Coroner
Tutewller rendered his verdict during
the day on the Big Four wreck which
occurred in this city Oct. 31. The cor
oner blames B. C. Byers, the chief
train dispatcher at Kankakee, who. he
says, failed to notify the Indianapolis
yardmaster that the special train was
coming. Sixteen people were killed in
the wreck, fifteen of whom were Pur
due students
The train was carrying l.Oofl pas
sengers from Lafayette, where Purdue
university is located, to witness the
annual football game between Purdue
and Indiana university in this city.
As the train was rounding a curve it
crushed Into a cut of coal cars out.
ward bound. The verdict exonerates!
the crew of the special train. Thft
judgment of the Big Four officials was
that this crew was responsible for the
wreck because the train was not under
control.
Persons
Engineer Killed and Four
Severely Injured.
Buffalo, N. Y.. Nov. 16.—One per
son was killed, four were severely in
jured and a number of others were
slightly bruised in the wreck of the
East Aurora accommodation train on
the Pennsylvania road a short dis
tance east of this city. The engine and
one coach went into the ditch and
the second coach was tipped half
way over, but remained upon the road
bed. The engineer. Alouzo Cole, was
buried under his engine and kilMp^
VERDICT OF GUILTY.
St. Louis Men Convicted of Naturalis
ation Frauds.
St. Ixniis. Nov. 16.—The jury in the
triple naturalization fraud cases, in
which Thomas E. Barrett, former mar
shal of the St. Louis court of appeals
John P. Iklan. chairman of the Demo
cratic city central committee, and
Policeman Frank Garret 1 are defend
ants. returned a verdict of guilty In
the United States district court.
MADE A RICH HAUL.
two
Bandits Rob a Railway Train In
South Africa.
Pretoria, South Africa, Nov. 16.—
Two men during the day boarded a
railway traiu as it was ascendiug a
steep grade between Pietersburg cud
Nylstroom, overpowered the gusrd,
looted the treasure car and escaped.
The robbers, it is reported, secured
150,000, which was consigned to the
dtandsrd bauk at Pre toils.
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TEN THOUSAND IDLE
LONG THREATENED LOCKOUT OF
BUILDING TRADES AT PITT§»
BURG IS EFFECTIVE.
wwtm mm
AR ULNMMM
UNLESS SYMPATHETIC STRIKES
JFCRE
CALLED OFF THE TROU-
BLE WILL 8PREAD.
AFFECTS »IX THOUSAND.
Reduction of Wages in RHedo Island
Cotton Mills.
Providence, R. I., Nov. 16.—Notices
of a reduction in wages have been
posted in the Goddard company's cot
ton mills at Blackstone and Lonsdale
and at the United States company at
Central Falls.
About 5.000 operatives are affected
In the lxnsdale mill, where the reduc
tion goes Into effect Nov. 30.
The United States Cotton company
employs 600 hands and the cut will
take place Nov. 23. The amount of
the reduction is not made know®,
POLYGAMY DOES EXIST.
Mormon Leader Says "Celestial
riages" Occur Daily.
Salt Lake. Utah, Nov. 16.—Polyg
amy is being practiced continually,
with the sanction of the Mormon
church, according to the sworn testi
mony of one of its leaders.
Elder Charles W. Penrose, editor of
tne church organ, the Desseret News,
declared "celestial marriages'' are be
ing performed daily by church author
ities, and that the marriage relation
under ihese marriages is not consid
ered unlawful.
RUSTLERS ARE AQGRESSlVCt
South Dakota Cattlemen Angered by
Costly Depredations.
Sioux Fails, S. D„ Nov. 16.—The
sattlemen in the western part of Fall
River county, west of the Pine Ridge
Indian reservation, have been greatly
angered by the depredations of cattle
"rustlers,'' who have recently become
very bold in that section. Cattle are
disappearing from the range In a mys
terious way and parties on the range
are suspected of slaughtering them
and selling the beef at Hot Springs,
Edgemont and other towns" in the
southwestern part of the state. It has
even been discovered that some of the
stolen beef has been taken as far as
Newcastle, Wyo.. and sold there.
Preliminary to waging a systematic
warfare 011 the "rustlers'" the cattle
men will publicly call attention to
the state law. which provides a heavy
penalty for the failure of persons sell
ing beef to exhibit the hides of the
animals. When this has been done
the cattlemen will see that the law is
strictly enforced, and if the "rustlers"
continue to violate it, and are de
tected in the act. no efforts will be
spared to secure their conviction and
imprisonment in the Sioux Falls peni
tentiary.
Far Eastern Situation Improves.
Paris. Nov. 16.—Official advices
show there is a distinct improvement
in the Russo-Japanese situation. It is
understood that the recent prolonged
indecision was due to forwarding re
ports of the negotiations for the per
sonal Inspection of the czar.
BRIEF BITS OF NEWS.
Camllle Pissarro, the impressionist
painter, is dead in Paris.
Lord Roberts, the British com*
mander-in-chlef. who is suffering from
pneumonia, passed a good night and is
making satisfactory progress towards
recovery.
King Victor Emmanuel and Queen
Helena of Italy, who are to-arrive in
England Nov. 17, will be received with
cen mony unusual even In the case of
crowned heads.
Mrs. Cora Casey, wife of Alexander
Casey, a mining man and capitalist,
committed suicide at Tucson, Ariz.,
by taking four ounces of carbolic acid.
She died in great agony.
Many hitherto unknown sayings of
Jesus Christ have been discovered in
Egypt by archaeologists, who havi dug
up papyri buried since the Second
century. 100 miles south of Cairo.
Instructions have been received by
the Wabash shop officials at Fort
Wayne, Ind., to reduce the working
force 10 per cent. Between sixty five
and eighty men will be dismissed
from the service.
Justice J. C. Prltchard of the su
preme court of the District of Colum
bia. formerly United States senator
from North Carolina, and Miss Lillian
Saum of Washington, but of North
Carolina parentage, were married at
GENERAL WOOD'S DEFENSE.
Letters From Root, Lawton and Milct
Contained in Document.
Washington, Nov. 16.—General Leon
ard Wood's defense against the
charges of Estes C. Rathbone and oth
ers, that his administration of the
military government of Cuba was cor
rupt, is contained in a document which
i !s mainly devoted to tributes to the
general's courage as a soldier.
It contains letters written by the
late General Lawton, General Xliles
ami former Secretary Alger, bearing
witness to the fact that General Wood
had acquitted himself splendidly un
der fire. There is also a memoran
dum. which was written by Secretary
Root, on the occasion of the filing of
Uatnbone's charges last spring, in
which Root gays that the war depart
ment was aware that there wad no
just foundation for such charges.
Pittsburg, Nov. 1G.—The threatened WILL RESUME WORK.
lockout by the Builders' Exchange
league against all crafts affiliated with Ulnars' Strike in Northern Colorado
the Building Trades council became Settled.
effective during the day, throwing 8.-' Loadville, Colo.. Not. 16.—Repre
OOO men out of employment. With flPntatlves of the miners of the North
the 2,000 men on sympathetic strikes ern coal district and the operators
10,000 are now idle. reached a satisfac tory conclusion
The officers of the league say there ^ar'y in the day aftei being in con
can be no settlement until the sympa
thetic strikes are called off and if
this Is not done before the close of
the week the number of men in the
lockout will be increased to 20.000.
The Building Trades council offi
cials say they are ready to meet the
league representatives and use their imity.
best endeavors to adjust the differ
enceg.
A number of buildings in course of
erection in this city and vicinity are
being held up by the lockout. It is
estimated that over $4,000.000 of new
ference for nine hours and in con
sequence the mines will, probably,
resume operations^shortly. The mat
ter will have to be* referred to the va
rious unions of the district for a
referendum vote.
It is believed that the agreement
will be ratified with practical unan
President Strnby of the Northern
Coal and Coke company acted as
chairman of the meeting and made
the following proposition:
"To settle the existing strike in
the Northern lignite field the oper-
buiiding contracts in Pittsburg have.ators in that field offer to resume
been postponed on account of the work on an eight-hour basis, with the
restlessness and strike tendencies of understanding that if the mineis lose
the present strike against the princi
pal operators in the Southern Color
ado field, or if said operators shall
not accept au eight-hour day. the min
ers shall go back to the hours pre
vailing before the strike."
lie also announced the wage scale
which the Northern Coal and Coke
company was willing to pay and which
nraa Increase of about 10 per cent.
the various trades unions employed or.
construction work.
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Nov. 16.—Wheat—Dec.,
77-S.c May. 77%c. On track—No.
ha id. 80i,fce No. 1 Northern, 79 W.
No. 2 Northern, 76%c NO. S north
ern, 72^®'74Vic.
St. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul, Nov 16.—Cattle—Good fo
choice steers, |[email protected] common to
fair, $:i.25(ft3.65 good to choice cows
and heifers. $2.7~6i 3.50 veals, f'i.oo
0. Hogs- $4.00p4.75. Shee p—
Good to choice yearling wethers, $3.2T
0 good to choice lambs, [email protected]
4.75,
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Nov. 16.—Wheat—To arrive
—No. 1 hard. 79%c No. 1 Northern,
78He No. 2 Northern. 75%c. On
track—No. 1 Northern, 78%c No. 2
Northern, 75^4c No. 3 spring, 7234c
Dec.. 7514c May, 76%c. Flax In
store, on track, to arrive and Noy„
Iter 98*4e May, $1.0214.
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago. Nov. 16.—Cattle—Good to
prime steers, $4.90({ip5.60 poor to me
dium. $3.2.1^4.70 stockers and
f,'..
4
feed­
ers. $2.00fc/4.00 cows. $1,50
heifers. [email protected] calves. $2.2ffr
7.2T. Hogs Mixed and butchers, $4.r«)
ii 4.f»5 good to choice heavy, $4.»i0(fi
4.Sr» rough heavy. $4.30[t4.6f light,
SS 4.50 f} 4.7 r». Sheep—Good to choice
we'her^, $ [email protected] Western sheep,
[email protected] native lambs, $3.7505 75
Western, $3.75(3)5 25.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago. Nov. 16.—Wheat Dec.,
76H -s«976'x.c old, 76%c May, 76%
July, 73HC. Corn—Nov., 41%c
f)ec
41«.s»/)41 Vfco: Jan.. 40%c May,
H'|fa)4l%c July, 41 Vie. Oats—Nov.,
33' jc Dec., 32%@33c May. 34% &
!4!-c July. 32%c. Pork—Jan.. $11.
IT1- May, $11.57%- Flax—Cash,
N'oi til western, $1.00 Southwestern,
i3c Dec., 93c May, 98c. Butter—
dreameries, [email protected]%c dairies. [email protected]
IS'jc. Eggs—22 #2 4c. Poultry—Tur
keys.
M(f?15c chickens, 9£9i£c
springs, 10c.
Bug Costs Too Much
When the price paid is the mother's
health and happiness. The father
doesn't realize as he romps with the
child what years of wifely suffering
must be set against the baby's laughter.
Chronic invalidism is a high price to
psy for the painful joy of maternity, yet
it is at such a cost that many a woman
becomes a mother. Such a price is too
much because
it is more than
nature asks.
By the use of
Doctor Pierce's
Favorite Pre
scription ma
ternity is made
practically
painless, and a
quick convales
ence is assured
in almost ev
ery case.
I am pleased
to give my testi
mony and wish I
could find words
strong enough to
induce other suf
ferers to use lr.
Pierce's Favorite
Prescription."
write* lira. Wesley Guy, of KentptvilV-. Ont.,
Box 6. "For eight year* after my little boy waa
born I Buffered with female weakness, also sore
ness in ovaries, especially on mv right side, and
pain in bark Was so miserable sometimes did
not know what I was going to do. Tried several
doctors but derived no tenefit until I began
using l)r. Pierce's Favorite Prescription. Had
only used four bottles, also some of fr l'ierce's
Antiseptic and Healing Suppositories, when I
felt like another person. I recommend Dr.
Pierce's medicines to all mv friends, If anyone
wishes to write me I will gladly answer."
Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription con
tains no alcohol and is entirely free from
opium, cocaine and all other narcotics.
The dealer who offers a substitute for
Favorite Prescription does so to gain
the little more profit paid on the sale of
less meritorious medicines. His profit
is your lost» therefore, accept no sub
stitute.
Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets regulate
tfeftfclMM1*
and
then come and see me, and
are renting
land
ber
%^COIPI
^/THU'R
^R-REVER^V
'A?
50
^j(|WY0BK
ELYS CREAM BALM
Ttiis Remedy is a Specific,
Sure to Give Satisfaction.
CIVE8 RELIEF AT ONCE.
It cleanses, soothes, heals, and protects tho
diseased membrane*. It cures Catarrh and
drives away a Old in the Head cjuiiklv.
ltestores the Senses of Taste and KmeiL
Kasy to use. Contains no injurious clings.
Applied into the nostrils and absorbed.
Lnr^'e Size, 50
cents at
Druggists
fc
Is
now,paying
show you just
If you want a
A5
good location in Madison
of substantial
Correspondence Solicited.
y y *-T y y y- y y. y" y-
CATARRH
or by
wl Triiil Size, 10 cents by mail. ft
HY BROTHERS, 56 War ran St., N«w Yuri
Fall Millinery
I have a well se
lected stock
of
Fall styles in
Ladies and Child
rens
hats
and in
vite you to call
and see
them.
Mats trimmed
to
suit purchasers
L. L.Grinager
CHICHESTER'S ENGUSH
PENNYROYAL PILLS
Mmtm. Alw«r» relUbU'. Ijidin. Mk Druwrist for
(•irMniTKat KWUIJUH in mui
M.H metallic boxes,
m-kM
wnh blue rfbbou.
Tak«M«ik»r. Brhw 4anc»r«Ba
iMktAtlMI. Huvof vuur l'nicvist,
or lend 4«. in ilamn fur Partlralari. Trail
•••lal* mod Relief
for
lr«."
tntrr,
by r«tara ••!!. Teaumouiala. Suid bj
1 UrucrMa.
OH1OHB0TKH OHBlflOAL OO.
«H MMUaa Maar*. PMtfUU, P4.
mssJkf
the
Basis
where *ou can raise W beat, Oats, Barley, Corn, Flax,
of
and the defraud for Lake Cutnly furtft is increasing!
ii vju are in search of a
Good Home in
a Good Climate 1
in lact everything adapted to this latitude, and
where you can successtullv carrv on
Dairying &
Stock Raising,
where your family will have the advantages
Good Society,
|J Good Schools,
Good Church Facilities,
I
$3
good land and sell it
will pay out in rental, where
will show you just what you want. If
to
$5
I
CITY
MEAT MARKET,
JOHN 8CIIULTZ Proprietor
Keep constantly on band
Fiih, fowl and Game in Mason.
Eftaa ave&i*t»
Dray Line.
s-
All Wealth
THE HADISOiM
State Bank
fladison, S. D.
(EST IITFITSII TIE (ITT.
AH kinds of Draying done I
promptly also moving
household goods. Piano A
Hoving a specialty.
rm Lo&ns Lowest
~*RATES^
a ful
fresh mil Cored seals
Potatoes,
of
per acre annual rental,I will
to you at
you are
and will give you easy terms of payment.
what
have such for you.
buildings have been built in fladison the past sea
son and the city is steadily growing in population.
Chas. B. Kennedy,
MADISON, SCliTB DAKOTA.
CHAS. B. KENNEDY,
President.
you
you
in three years,
A
large num­
J. M. WII.LIAH50N,
Vice PresttlMt.
ORDER YOUR
COAL
FROM
S. Y. HYDE
Elevator
Main In
Co.
They
handle the best
grades, delivered to any
part
of the city.
JOHN THEOPHILUS,
Agent
Do You
KNOW IT?
ROCKY MOUNTAIN TEA
Make* You Well, Keepa You
Wall.
Badt,
iA.t
G«ra»
Pirn plea, Btoteh«s, Uvtr Mark*. Sfcta Braffa
tiuna, Constipation. Sick If
Confeated
Howela, Bladder Disorder*,
tores Beautv aad Perfect W«
QenuineASCtS, PKktf*. Will Mljf
^UOr^M MEOtttNB 60m lUilna. Wl*
%m4S- 'i

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