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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, December 03, 1903, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1903-12-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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ESTABLISH KD 1880
THE OLD RELIABLE
IIP
Absolutely Pure
THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE
THE POST OFFICE
AND THE PEOPLE
jPtUils of American System De
scribed by M. G. Cunniff.
BOW THE MACHINE IS REGULATED
tli« Oorcralif Power—An­
cient Method* Still Olitatu—
•f lt« Shor l«*oiniiirk ou tlie I'ubllo.
o w O u S u o a i W i
That of Forelarn C'oantrlo.
The World's Work for November
contains the first of a series of articles
by M. G. Cunniff on the American
postal system. Prefacing his article,
Mr. Cunniff states that it is his pur
pose "to tell the facts about our post
office, with the hope of arousing inter
est la the department of the govern
ment's business which most nearly
touches every citizen to lead to a reali
sation of its shortcomings and to help
to secure improvements which will
put the United States post olliee sen ice
ou a par with the service of other civ
ilized lands."
The following la taken from Mr. Cun
niff's article:
I asked Postmaster General Payne
how, in his opinion, the I'liited States
post ottice compares in efficiency with
private business organizations and
with foreign post offices.
"How do 1 know?" said he. "I've
been postmaster general only a year."
An assistant postmaster general, once
luvited to address a convention of post
masters, Jokingly replied, so runs the
•tory:
"I cannot
go.
1
couldn't tell you
anything anyway. What do I know
about the postal business'.'"
8aid another assistant postmaster
general:
"If a man attends closely to bis work
he can learn to manage one of these
departments in about four years. Then
he goes out and another pupil comes in
—the chances are, a politician. A busi
ness? Why, it's simply a training
school!"
These three remarks do not argur
that the speakers were regarded evei.
In cynical Washington as poor otti
cials. Indeed the two assistants were
quite the reverse. But inquiring into
the workings of the post office it is nec
essary iirst to understand the weak
ness of tlie system at the top. and hen'
It Is.
The postmaster general, however,
snd his four assistants are not the post
office. It was apparent as early as
1804, when there was only one assist
ant postmaster general, that the polit
ical heads of the post office do not be
long to the machine. The machine be
gins with the chief clerks and superin
tendents and their army of civil service
subordinates, who hold their places
while administrations come and go and
who manage the postmasters, the
contracts, the delivery service, tlie
money order system, tlie inspections.
These officials put their initials on ex
ecutive documents and hand the docu
ments, great piles of them, to the as
sistant postmasters general, who sign
them. It would require omniscience
for an assistant postmaster general to
know whether lie should sign or not.
He trusts the initials, a system still in
vogue. In brief, the system is one in
wbich the permanent subordinates
have every chance to direct all but the
most wide awake of their temporary
heads—the cart before tlie horse. The
attorney general's office superintends
the enforcement of postal laws. A
branch of the treasury department
audits the accounts, though, unlike all
other branches of the government, the
l»ost ofth-e is its own bank and does not
use the treasury for regular banking
purposes. But the service of the- at
torney general's office and of the treas
ury department is uot paid fpr by the
post office. Misfit bits of three depart
ments with separate accounts do the
country's postal business.
The machine has grown up. not or
ganically, but by accretions of unre
lated departments, under laws passed
la MBwaifciiiirnte goatwmter
general has conceived ol an improve
ment in the service. Postmaster oil
era I Wanamaker tried to reorganise
It. There are men in the civil service
machine today who know more about
post office affairs In their own depart
ments than any outsider could possibly
know who would like to make im
provements. Why can't they? Simply
because the real directors of the post
office have been the members of the
committee on post offices and post
roads in the house of representatives.
Congress must necessarily decide the
policy of the post office, but It Is a be
wildering complication of an Institu
tion, a 1 read}* complex, to have some of
its most powerful quasi officials in a
house committee.
Instead of working on business prin
ciples the post office machine Is gov
erned by a bulky book of laws that
has grown from the slim book of 1794
as fast as successive congresses have
eared to pass postal bills. Rates of
postage are changed, service is ren
dered, contracts are made under regu
lations passed by men dead for genera
tions, whose laws were made for a
post office which as late as 1873 cost
in total expenditures only what it costs
now for the single item of railroad
transportation. The post office depart
ment may recommend until it is wear}",
and these laws do not budge. Con
gress—and that means chiefly the
house post office committee-says
what the post office shall do and shall
not do. I once asked a high post office
official why he failed to carry out a
plan he had to save perhaps the total
amount of the post office deficit oq
certain contracts, lie shrugged his
shoulders.
"Why bump one's head against a
stone wall?" saH be. "Congress won't
pass it."
"Every plan that bas ever been pre
sented to cougress for improving the
postal service," said a higli post office
authority, "has been scrutinized by in
terests. Do you supjwse we can have
a revision changing the present rates
of paying the railroads as long as some
of the most prominent senators and
congressmen are identified with trans
portation interests?"
I turned to another official.
"Do you mean," said I, "that you
rould not pass a bill obnoxious to in
terests?"
"Well," and he smiled diplomatically,
"there would certainly be opposition."
Finally there is the civil service sys
tem. If a post office official fulfills his
routine duties he rises in the service
by sheer mechanism. Once In a berth
It requires a trial for gross Inefficiency
or misconduct to get him out. If the
miasma of an office where there Is no
spur of self interest tovgoad a mail to
effort fails to stitie his progressiveuess.
sophistication tells him that It is 1111
wise to arouse an interest. "Not too
much zeal!" is a watchword in the
United States post office. Even if the
head of a department wished to have
a force as efficient as that demanded
by the manager of a business, he could
not have It.
Tiny Switzerland has many things to
teach us. So have Germany, France
and England.
In a German city—take Berlin, for
example -there is a post office every
few hundred yards. A post office cart
be found as easily as a cigar store in
New York. A network of underground
tubes connects all but the very small
est. Ordinary mail goes from station
to station by government owned wag
ons. but a special delivery card or
stamp, costing less than 8 cents, will
cause a message to be shot by tube
anywhere in the city. A messenger
will carry it from the point of recep
tion the few necessary yards to the
receiver and will wait for an answer.
Message and answer In Berlin take
about two hours. This is service far
speedier than any In the United States.
The German telegraph system Is an
adjunct of the post office. Telegrams,
costing 12 cents for ten words, includ
ing address, beat special delivery let
ters by just the margin between elec
tric and pneumatic transmission. Postal
checks for small amounts almost whol
ly take the place of bank checks. One
may send a postal money order with a
message written on the back, and a
postal messenger will bring It to the
house of the receiver and pay It there
on the spot, service as accurate and
complete as by personal messenger.
Subscription to magazines and news
papers is through the post office. You
pay the postmaster, he orders the prop
er number of publications for his of
fice, and the Journals co ne cheaply and
smoothly In bulk to the several sta
tions for delivery. And not only does
a parcels post do practically all the
German express business at low rates,
depending on weight and distance, but
Germany, through agreements with
other nations, sends parcels around
the world. I know a resident of Berlin
who has a package of meat mailed to
him every Saturday from a point lot)
miles away iu Silesia for a little more
thmi 1- cents, the rate for a twenty
pound parcel. German merchants tie
liver most of their goods by mail, the
small storekeeper thus provided with
as good a delivery service as the lar
ger. All the parcels, large and small,
are brought of course to the address
to which they are directed. Germans
have even been permitted to mail
eleven pound parcels to addresses in
the United States.
In London the pneumatic tube sys
tem is so perfected that within the
radiu* of London one may send an
Mdiuiirj.
Jetier, §&
iJMirtr,
send another and receive uu iuishci
that all In the course of a day. De
liveries run until V) and 10 o'clock in
the evening. T'lie English post office
maintains a telegraph system, conve.v
lug twelve word messages all ov
Great Britain and Ireland for 12 cents
and a parcels post system comparable
to the German and, furthermore, main
talus a savings bank. All this pa}.
The United States post office fails
to
give such service and fails to pay even
its expenses.
It would be Impossible in New Yorlc,
for example, to send a letter, reeeh e
an answer, send again and receive an
other answer, all in a day, as in Lou
don. The pneumatic tube service is
very restricted. A letter posted down
town at 4 o'clock will uot be deliver* 1
uptown in the residence district until
the next morning.
If
packages are t"
bulky for t^ie ordinary carrier one
must journey to the post office
for
them, and likewise one goes to the po
office to cash money orders.
I asked a high post office official wl y
parcels are not delivered.
"The public don't demand it," sa I
he. "They don't object to going to th
post office."
Your neighbor may post a four pound
package to San Francisco for 04 cent
It would cost him the same to send it
to you next door. A German might
mall a ten pound package from Ger
many to Salt Lake City. You could
not without paying prohibitory letter
postage rates. Mr. James L. Cowh
sent a suit case thus from New York
directly to New Haven. The stamp
cost $3.08. He could have sent It via
Germany for $1.1)5. Offered at any
post office ns fourth class matter, It
would not have been accepted at all
It weighed eleven pounds. Practical
ly, then, the United States post
office
says, "Send all but your smaller pack
ages by slow and uncertain private ex
press. and send all your urgent mes
sages by expensive private telegraph."
or put In
a telephone.
When the Angora goat can be bought
at a reasonable price—say $3 each or
thereabout—it will pay every man who
has a considerable quantity of brush
land to clear up to get a flock. They
do better on this kind of land than
sheep do and besides destroy mor-»
brush. But it must be remembered
that they are not so large as sheep
and sold in the open market for their
meat alone will uot bring as much per
head as sheep will, said E. Nordimui
lu an address before the Wisconsin
farmers* institute. Their fleece also
is not so valuable on the average s
that of the sheep. Ou this account
I would not think it advisable to pay
the big prices that have so far ob
tained in n rthern Wisconsin for the
Angora goat. But at a reasonable
price it pa} to have them if there is
work for th to do and the fences are
built in such a way as to keep them in
their place.
As I see it the Angora goat question
may l»e summed up as follows: It pays
to get goats in the place of sheep
one is prepared to purchase a fair sized
flock and has the brush land for them
to work on. The purchase price of the
grade Angora should not, however,
greatly exe h! the price of sheep, and
they should be bought iu sutficie-i
numbers to make it pay for the extra
fencing that would have to be done on
their accou t, but on cleaned up farms
or where there are not to exceed five
or ten acre of brush land on the place
in my opinion it will pay better to
stick to sheep and use the ax or brush
scythe on the large, tough bushes that
the sheep v ill not destroy.
Experience With Angora Uoati.
I am very fond of Angora goats, and
anything 1 say will be to their Interest,
although, like everything else, they
have their drawbacks, writes a contrib
utor in American Cultivator. I only
have between 'AM) and 3M» head on
hand at present and am young in the
business, having been interested in it
only about three years to amount to
anything, but the more I see of ther:
the more 1 want them.
They have proved to me without an,y
doubt brush killers they have prove
that they will live where cattle an 1
nheep would die, and ro far as my pel
nonal experience has gone I bt-lleve th"
land they clear up during the summer
pays for the cost of keeping them th
whole year. In other words, the Ian
Is worth enough more when they
through with it in the fall of the year
to pay for their wintering.
Goats will eat some grass, but llv*
principally on brush, leaves and twig*
if they can get It. which is the way I
iistinguisli them from sheep, as slice
will eat some brush, but their principal
living is grass. They are very fond
clover, and
goats
trees.
o
are
Just as
fond e'
brush.
I use steel wovpb wire flpticfng fortj
five inches high, which will sti any
goat If put up in decent shape, yet I
believe thirty-six inch fencing will stop
per cent of the goats if put up prop
erly, birt the disadvantage to a thirty
six huh fence Is it becomes Ragged
down, as Is tbe case if heavy limbs fail
on It. I use forty-five inches to allow
for sagging and string
It
principally on
MADISON SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1903
M. J. Bain. Ann Arbor—"Have tried
many medicines but find nothing so
iMod as Rocky Mountain Tea."
There's no other medicine that makes
sick people well so quickly. cents.
Frank Smith.
A
CALUMET
Baking* Powder
complies with the pure
food laws of all states*1
Food prepared with it
is free from Rochelle
salts, lime, alum and
ammonia.
Policeman's Testimony,
J, N. Patterson, night policeman of
Nashua, la., writes, "Last winter
I
Schutz & Ketehain.
had
a bad cold on my lungs and tried at
least a half dozen advertised cough
medicines and had treatment from two
physicians without getting any benefit.
A friend recemmended Foley's Honey
and Tar and two thirds of a bottle mired
me. I consider it the greatest cough
a::d lung medicine in the world."
The Genuine vs. Counterfeits.
The genuine is always better than a
counterfeit, but the truth of this state
ment is never more forcibly realized or
thoroughly appreciated than when you
ompare the genuine DeWitt's Witch
Hazel Salve with tin- many counterfeits
and worthless substance that are on the
market. WT. S. Ledbetter of Shreveport,
La., says: "After using numerous other
remedies without benefit, one box of
DeWitt's Witch Hazel Salve (lured
We-" For blind, bleeding, itching and
otruding piles no reined)' is equal to
DeWitt's Witch HbzcI Saltie. Bold by
Cook & Odee.
rniLiow
robe
fSICH BHD DEMOTE.
^SALE BY
ERICK HYLAND.
Trnat Brking Pnwden Mil for 45 or
60r»nts per pnuud and may be iden
tified by llits Morhitant priffl.
Tliey art' a nipuace to puMir health,
ns food prpparsd from them con
tains larir« quautof RoctiPlla
salts, a dangerous cathartic diuf.
i FRESH I
1 BAKED GOODS
I EVERYDAY AT
J. E. COLE'S
1 We are doing our own baking now and can supply cus
to mors with all kinds of Baked (loads* Special orders solicit
ed.
A fresh Invoice of Chocolates and Bon Bons just received.
Hamm's Beer
ON DRAUQHT AT
THE SAN JUAN BUFFET
W.
F. 0I05SI,
Prop.
DO YOU KNOW?
BALTIC is the
Flour.
i carry a full line of
Baltic, Madison, Woon
socket Flour.
Also Seeds, Rock Salt,
Feed, Gasoline and Kerosene
Oil, Wood, etc.
HUHDEUIER.
HIT
HUNDEMER BLK,
FOURTH STREET.
F. Kl Ell EPS tti
Palace Meat
Market
Having re-engaged hi busi
ness, we solicit the patronage of
former customers and new ones.
We carry the choicest meats
and will guarantee to please.
Your Children Need
SCHOOL SHOES
and we have a line fn all
that will stand the rough wear.
LADIES
call and see our New Fall dress
patterns which arrived a few
days ago.
J.J. DAHL& SON.
AAAA A AAA A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
VfVVV WW W
WW WW WWW W WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WWW WTW
WARM SHOES
We have Just received the largest and beat auorted line
of WARH SHOES and SUPPERS that ever came to the city
of Madison. If you need anything in this line, come and look
through our line, also a large and complete line of Men's,
Ladies' and Children's articles, in different styles and grades,
including the famous "Gold Seal and "Star" brands which
are made of pure gum and are the best articles on the market.
We are also Headquarters for Fine shoes and slipper for
Dress wear and when you buy of us you always get the best.
Try us for the next pair of shoes and you will always be a
CUStOIW.
N I K O N S A
I I I I I I I I I i n i I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 11 I I
iBBooooDOBDoaBaoaaBaaayaBBniyaaaaaamBMrai
The Complete I
'"r: i
Furniture Store.
R. C: McCALLISTER.
Everything in the line of house furnishing*?
UNDERTAKING
3 a specialty, in charge of licensed embalmer for
n Minnesota and South Dakota. The latest and
most refined appliances. Calls answered day
or night.
CI
a
rinnnnniiinnnnaBniriiTiniiinmnrirnnnnnnnnrinnnnrnnnnnnnBHMnnnnn.
MUSLIN
GreatfSpecial Sale of Ladie's Muslin
Goods. I have the most complete line
and will make prices you have not heard
of to close it out. It will be cheaper than
you can buy the material to make.
Commencing Saturday. Do not fail
to see this line. 1
C. H. MORSE.
StrainedHHoney
16c PER POUND.
at
TOM CAREY'S.
,1-'
4
$
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PRICE FIVECEN'P
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