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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 10, 1904, Image 4

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1904-08-10/ed-1/seq-4/

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K4K LEAVE HIS POST
11 Wlw'iw' fj*
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AMERICAN MINISTER WILL QUIT
TANTINOFLE IF l||S|P-
QONS1
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TIATION8
FAIL.1'*-
enter wscbsjes tk stmtim
SECRETARY MAY TELLS WHY HE
PEQUESTED WARSHIPS FOR
n
TURKISH FORT.
I
Washington. Aur. 10. Soorrtnry
Hay occupied considerable time at the
cabinet meeting In a presentation of
the latest phases of the Turkish situa
tion. He recounted the details of his
interview with Chekib Bey. the Turk
ish minister, at which the secretary
forcibly stated the attitude of the
Americun government. He explained
also the reasons which had actuated
him in r«Questing that the American
European squadron should be sent to
Smyrna, the most convenient port to
Constantinople. It is not deemed wise
by the secretary that the reasons for
this action should be disclosed entire
ly at this time. Fresh negotiations
with the porte have been Instituted
and. in the event of their failure, it
may be that Minister Irishman may
leave his post and go aboard the
American flagship, thus creating a Kit
uation of some Keriousness.
PICK J0HN80N FOR GOVERNOR.
MinrtMOta Democratic Leader* Hold
Conference.
St. Paul, Aug. 10.—Twenty or more
prominent Democratic leaders of Min
nesota held what was Intended to be
a secret meeting in St. Paul and de
cided upon John A. Johnson of St.
I'eler as a candidate for governor At
the same meeting Congressman John
Lind wan endorsed &s> a candidate tor
the supreme bench.
A number of candidates were dis
cuss«d, among them Judge Pond, F. (».
Winston and W. 11. Harries. Captain
Harries, however, declined to be con
sidered and is the man who suggest
ed the candidacy of Mr. Johnson of St.
Peter. After the meeting Captain
Harries admitted that Mr. Johnson
had been agreed upon.
WISCONSIN FACTIONAL
FI6HT
STALWARTS AUTHORIZED TO BE*
GIN SUIT BY STATE
PREME COURT.
i
4„ IP'
1
Madison, Wis.. Aug. 10.—Tfie Wis
consin supreme court during the day
issued an order giving the stalwart
faction of the Republican party of the
state authority to bring suit against
Secretary of State Houser to restrain
him from placing the nominees of the
La Follette state ticket on the official
ballot under the regular party desig
nation of Republican aud compelling
him to place the stalwart nominees
on the ballot under the designation of
Republican.
The court granted the request with
out leaving the bench. The defendant
Is given twenty days Id which to an
swer and the case will coriie up for
argument Sept. 6. The La Follette
faction will contest the action.
FILIPINOS SEE PRESIDENT.
Party of Moroa and Iflorrotea Call at
White Heuae.
i~ Washington, Aug. 10.—Picturegque
ly, but quite adequately garbed, a
party of eight Moro and igorrote
hiefs, constituting a part of the Phil
ippirie exhibit at the St. Louis exposi
tion, paid their respects to President
Roosevelt at the White House. The
exchanges between the chiefs and the
president were informal, but happy In
their to»ne. Through Antero, a bright
flfteen-yenr-old Igorrote boy, who act
ed as interpreter, the Moro dattos and
the Igorrote chiefs expressed their
pleasure at being received by the pres
ident and told him he might depend
upou their loyalty to the American
government.
Tp STUDY AMERICAN SYSTEM.
German Minister and Several Engi
neers Sail for United States.
Berlin, Aug. 10.—Herr Schultz, un
der secretary of state in the ministry
of public works, with three govern
ment engineers, have sailed for New
York from Bremen on the North Ger
man Lloyd steamer Kron Prinz Wil
helm to visit the St. Louis exposition
and various American cities with the
object of studying municipal and other
engineering and building problems.
The party will make a thorough study
of Ntw York's underground railway.
JEALOUSY THE CAU8E.
St. Louis Negro Shoots Wife, Brother.
.**- in-Law and Himself.
St. Ixniis, Aug. 10.—John P. John
son, a negro living at Kinloch Park, a
suburb, shot bis wife twice, wounding
her severely shot and killed his
brother-in-law and then, with the same
revolver, ended his own life. Jealousy
is said to have prompted the crime.
Johnson killed his brother-in-law be
cause he tried to protect his sister.
Clpar Stub Injures Woman's Eye.
01. Paul, Aug. 10.—Miss Nannie
Johnson of South St. Paul met with a
very peculiar accident, the result of
which, it is feared, will be the total
loss of the sight at- one of her eyes.
As Miss Johnson was whlking along
the street with two other persons a
man passing in a buggy threw away a
cigar stub, the lighted end of which
struck Miss Johnson in the eye and
some of the sparks and ashes poo*
trated beyond the eyeUda,
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RETAIL DEALERS AFFECTED.
Ne Ice for Houses Patronizing Strike
Affected Packers.
CbScagd, Aug 10 —With au army of
more than 30u pickets the ice Wagon
Drivers and Helpers' union estab
iished a blockade of the retail and
cold storage meat market business of
Chicago. In front of nearly every
meat market, cold storage warehouse
and apartment store that handles meat
one picket or more is on duty to try
to prevent delivery from the stock
yards or elsewhere.
The union determination to extend
the strike to the cold storage ware
houses came as a distinct surprise to
the packers and this was accentuated
by the action of the ice car helpers,
who declared an intention not to han
dle ice for any dealer who patronizes
the strike affected packers.
Adding to the complication came a
declaration from the business agent of
the Market Wagon Drivers' union that
his men would have nothing to do with
meat which the Ice wagon drivers re
fuse to Ice.
Vice President Rath of the Packing
house Teamsters* union gave out a
list of dealers to whom he declared
the union ice wagons would, under
union orders, refuse to deliver Ice.
The allied trades executive commit
tee has adopted resolutions denounc
ing President Edward Tilf*n of Lib
bey. McNeill Lilibey and demanding
hie resignation as a member of the
public school board of Chicago.
COLORADO RAILROAD WRECK
yv it'
U4T or VICTIMS INDICATES A
LOSS OF AN EVEN ONE
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MUNDREO LIVES.
Pueblo, Colo., Aug. 10.—The death
Ifst resnltfng from the wreck of the
World's Fair flyer on the Denver and
Rio Grande road, as compiled from the
best obtainable sources of information,
shows a total of 0 identified dead,
total known missing 28 and unidenti
fied bodies 6, making an even 100
ItveB lost. This list will more than
likely be added to.
Ail night long the search for victims
was kept up and an occasional body
was located, but In the darkness work
was necessarily slow. The moBt
treasherous of streams, the Fountain
river, into which nearly all the dead
bodieB were washed, has fallen to
nearly its normal condition and the
work of rescue will be made easier,
although still dangerous from quick
sand. As soon as daylight came on
many men again took up the work
and the number was Increased as the
day wore on. Bodies have been re
covered more than ten miles from the
scene of the disaster and rumors that
bodies bad been found even farther
distant are heard.
A cast of deep gloom has settled
down on this city as a result of the
disaster. Many business houses are
closed out of respect for the dead and
more than forty private homes are
darkened and tin mourning. The
wreck victims will probably not be the
only ones or the most to be pitied, as
already cases of total loss of mind as
a result of the shock when told of loss
of loved ones are reported.
ALLEGE SCALE8 ARE WRONQ.
Eight Hundred Miners Quit Work for*
That Reason.
Scranton, Pa., Aug. 10.—Eight hun
dred miners employed at the Old
Forge colliery of the Erie company
went on strike during the day. The
strikers claim that the scales with
which the mine cars are weighed are
incorrect and that they are deprived
of the credit for half a ton of coal for
each car. The miners asked that an
expert make an examination of the
scales. The company, they cjaim,
agreed to this, but before the inspec
tion was finished the company coun
termanded the order.
The trouble at the Barnum colliery,
where 1,000 men are on strike, it Is
said, is of a similar character.
FIGHTING THE OPEN SHOP.
Strike ai Chicago Will Aifoct Ten
Thousand Tailors.
Chicago, Aug. 10 —Trimmers, cut
ters, bushelnten and examiners kin
ployed by fourteen clothing manufac
turers of Chicago, members of the Na
tional Clothiers' Exchange, struck
during the day. It was estimated that
t00 men quit work. An official of a
large clothing house said that if the
strike continues within a short time
10,000 tailors will be out of employ
ment because of a lack of supplies
with whivh to work.
Action of the union followed an an
nouncement that hereafter the employ
ers Intended to run on the "open shop"
P#"
1 1
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I NO MOTIVE KNOWH*
Unknown Men Wreck Woman's Home
at Butte, Mont.
Butte, Mont., Aug. 10.—The resi
dence of Mrs. Bella Powers was blown
to pieces during the day. Three un
known men placed a large charge of
giant powder in a closet, lighted the
fuse and fled. The trio were seen leav
ing the house by Guy Sweet, a roomer.
Sweet and his wife and Tom Hower
and Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were more
or less severely Injured by the explo
sion. There is no clue to the perpe
trators and no motive for the deed
Is aosigned. *,*'
Injunction Against StrlkoMt
Sioux City, la., Aug. 10.—Judge
Reed, in the federal court, has grant
ed an injunction restraining the strik
ers at the Cudahy packing plant from
interfering in any way with the opera
tion of the plant. About lOtl M4?J*era
are restrained Individually, k
_____________
Military Prisoners Escape.
Butte, Mont, Aug. 10.—A Miles City
(Mont.) dispatch says seven soldiers
confined in the guardhouse at Fort
Keogli broke jail and took to the
prairie. A company of cavalry is in
ursuit, but none of tfc* deserters has
iZ1cftffturod.
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.*'/ BASEBALL SCORES.
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National League.
At Philadelphia, 15 Pittsburg, fc
At Boston, 1 Cincinnati, 4.
At New York, 4 St Louis, 3.
At Brooklyn. 1: Chicago, 4.
American League.
At Detroit, 2 Boston, 0.
At Cleveland, 9 New York,
At St. Louis, 1: Washington, f.
At Chicago,
Philadelphia, •.
American Association.
At l-ouihvllle, 4 St. Paul. 12.
At Columbus. 7 Kansas city, 8.
At Toledo, 0 Minneapolis. 7.
At Indianapolis Milwaukee. 6.
Second ganM»—indiaaoftolls. I MM*
waukee, 2.
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Aug. 9.—Wheat—Sept,
$1.04u I**-. $l.U0»-i May. $1.01%®
1.017*. On ttack—No. 1 hard, $1.11%
No. 1 Northern, $1.09% No. 2 North
ern, Jl.OdV*.
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Aug. 9. —Wheat—To arrtvt
—No. 1 Northern, $1.15 No. 2 North
ern, $1.1114. On track—No. 1 North*
em, $1.15 No. 2 Northern, $l.ll&
Sept., $1.05 Dec., 99%c. Flax—On
track, to arrive and Sept., $1.24%
Oct., $1.24% Nov., $1,241,6 Dec.,
$1.24%.
St Paul Union Stoofc Yanft.
St. Paul, Aug. 9.—Cattle—Good to
choice steers, $5.15fy5.65 common to
fair, $3.50®4.50 good to choice West
ern, $4.00(^4.25 good to choice cows
and heifers. $2.90(^4.00 veals, [email protected]
4.50. Hogs—$4.85#535. Sheep—Good
to choice yearling wethers, $3.75®
4.25 good to choice lambs, [email protected]
Chicago Union 8tock Yards.
Chicago, Aug. 9.—Cattle—Good to
prime steers, $5.2r»^H.4o poor to me
dium, *4.(Mi©5.00 stockers apd feed
ers, $2.00^4.25 cows, [email protected]
heifers, [email protected] calves, $2.50©
5.75. Hogs—Mixed and butchers, $5.30
4^5.05, good to choice heavy. $5.30^0
5.50 rough heavy, $4.30 light,
$5.30(15.70. Sheep- Good to choice
wethers, $3.75(1' 1.25 Western sheep,
$3.»0Ci'4.15: native lambs, $4.00®0.75
Western, $5.0066.25.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago. Aug. 9.—Wheat Sept.,
$1.01 •, old, $1,031 Dec., $1.01 May,
$1.02 6. Corn—Aug., 527^c Sept.,
53'yfe(it53%0 Dec.. 49%c May, 49VsC.
Oats—Aug., 339tc Dec., 34»4c: May,
36^4 c. Pork—Sept., $12.37H$i 12.40
Oct., $12.45 Jan., $12.90. Flax—Cash.
Northwestern. SI-24Vb Southwestern,
$1.17 Aug.. $1.17 Sept., $1.17. Butter
—Creameries, 13$pl7c dairies, ll'"
15c. Eggs—12% @10% c. Poultry
Turkeys, [email protected] chickens, [email protected]
springs, [email protected]
PIMPLES
"I all kind* of blood romodlo* which fml»d
to do mti any good hut 1 liavo found tlui rl^ht llnntf
at lamt. My fai waa full of
IIIIII Ihh
TIih
and tilin k
li«adn. Aft«r taking Caa*ar«ta tlioy all Uft I tun
ronilnning th« une of tlieni and lceonimem! i hk
til .-in to my frfpnda. I feel fine when I rtae in t)i«
morning. Hope to have a chance to recommend
CaacareM." i
Fred C. Wltteo, 76 Elm St., Newark, N J.'
Best For
m. The Bow«t»
CANOV CATtumC
PtaMftnt. Palatable. Potent. Tait# Qodl,XI«9eod,
N«*er Sicken, VVi»»k«n orirli«. 10c. 2So, 5®c. Never,
Hold In bulk.
khiiuIIIM tnMi't mumped CCC.'
(iuaranteed to cure or your moimy back.
Sterling Remedy Co., Chicago or N.Y. 595
ANNUAL SALE, TEN MILLION BOXES
the Brewery Bottling.
tlorni strict ly confidential HANDBOOK
«»Mit free, oldest nueix-v tor tuvumiK patenla.
I'ntcnts titkwn tnrouL'ii Mnnii A (receive
tperlat Ittitlte, without ctiarni', ill th«
Scientific American.
hntidsnmely llluxtrntivl vrnoklr lnri/tsi c!r.
rn in
11. mi ..f n v s. n ittc Jo urn til. 'ifrinH, 11
v.'ir, I'm iii"!i I lis, $1. SoidLyiill tu» »itiHl»'ri.
MUNN S Co.36IBre"d-'v New York
PBUE JVNO R1ELL0W
HIGH HUD OELICHTE.
FOR SALE UV
ERICK HVLAKD
A True
Tonic
A real malt extract, rich
in tonic properties an*j|^
perfect dfgestant is
^mheuser-B
OSCA/^
Anheuser-Busch Brewing Ass'n
St. Louis. U S.A.
World'* Fair Visitors are cordially invited to visit
the Anheuser-Busch Brewery.
The malt is a food the hops
atonic. The alcohol—
only 3yi per cent—is
an aid to digestion a healthful stimulant.
Schlitz Beer is brewed with the extreme of
cleanliness— cooled in filtered a$ aad
$very bottle is sterilized.
It is one of the best things in the world for you.
does not ferment on the stomach, because it
is aged—aged for months in refrigerating
rooms before it is marketed.
gives you beer without bilioiwtw^i. Ask
your doctor what he thinks about drinking
Schlitz beer. Ask for iw
Hi
TMfll MARK.
It contains 14.60 per cent genuine
nutritive extract, less than
2
per
cent of alcohol—non-intoxicating.
Builds flesh, bone, tissue—gives
appetite and energy.
All Druggists tell it. Prepared oaty tp
100, Fred Km*,
10^ v^i^nin St'*•
The Beer That MadeMiiwaukee famous
YOUR KIDNEYS
Mr. C. A', Sttllson. merchant of Tampico, III., wrftts: "POttV
KIDNEY CURE Is meeting with wonde-ful success. It has cured
some cases here that physicians pronounced incurable. I mystelf am
able to testify to its merits. My face today is a living, pictm Of health
and FOLEY'S KIDNEY CURE has made it such."
BO YEARS'
PATENTSEXPERIENCE
I RADC MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone fP'idliiK ankpteh ami diwrrlptlon ma*
quickly tistvi
1
un our |*inl..n fru« whether an
Invention i« tnh«bly paivntnble.
'.tnniunlcH-11Patents
tW, K i?t.. Washlutfioii. JL. t.
Unless they are, good health is impossible.
Every drop of blood in the body passes through and is filtered by healthy kidneys every three minutes. Sound
ktdneys strain out the impurities from the Slood, diseased kidneys do not, hence you arc sick. FOLEY'S KIDNEY
CURE makes the kidneys well so they will eliminate the poisons from the blood. It removes the cause of the
many diseases resulting from disordered kidneys which have allowed your whole system to become poisoned.
Rheumatism, Bad Blood, Gout, Gravel, Dropsy, Inflammation of the Bladder, Diabetes and Bright's Disease,
aad many others, are all due to disordered Kidneys. A simple test for Kidney disease is to set aside your urine
in a bottle or glass for twenty-four hours. If there is a sediment or a cloudy appearance, it indicates that your
kidneys are diseased, and unless something is done they become more and more affected until Bright's Disease
or
Diabetes develops.
FOLEY'S KIDNEY CURE is the odly preparation which will positively cure all forms of Kidney and
Bladder troubles, and cure you permanently, It is a safe remedy and certain in results.
If You arc a sufferer, take FOLEY'S K10NEY CURE at once. K will make you well.
Stmt Pronouncsd Inourablt
l5s
Two 8Iz68| 50 Cents and
SOLD UD REGONEKDED BY
STODDARD & HALSTEAD
LAND!
and tHc demand
for take
11
vou are
Good Home in
Dairying &
Correspondence Solicited."
w w w y w
Jm /Sirf- "I i-J
where *ou can raise Wheat, Cats, Earley, Corn, Flax, Potatoes,
£&. fact every thinsr adapted to this latitude and
where you can successfully carrv on
ARE THEY
WELL?
Had Lumbago and Kldnay Trwbla
Edwfffl HUBS, a well known business man of Salisbury,Mo., writes:
"I wish to say for the benefit of others, that I was a sufferer from
lumbago and kidne trouble, and all tnt remedies I took gave me no
relief. I began to take FOLEY'S KIDNEY CURE, and after tbe um of
three bottles I am cured."
$1.00.
Is the Basis cf AH Wealth
Curt) fern
in »eaicti ot a
i Increasing.
a Good Climate
Stock Raising,
and where your family will bave the advantages o
Good Society,
1
Good Schools,
Good Church Facilities,
then come and see me, and I wilt show you just what you want. If'you
are renting land now. paying $3 to $5 per acre annual rental, 1 will
jhow you just as good land and sell It to you at what yoi|
will pay out In rental, where you are in three years^
and will gjve you easy terms of payment.
If you want a good location in Madison I have such for you. A large num
ber of substantial buildings have been built in fladison thepa*t rea
son and the city is steadily growing in population*
Chasv B. Kennedy,
5
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA.
I
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