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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 18, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1904-11-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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FIGHTING CONTINUOUS
TROOP8
Shrapnel lire dispersed their reserve*
and the assault was repulsed. Ou.
losses were 1 officer and about 71 men
killed and 4U0 wounded.
Engineer Captain Sakharoff, for
®erly governor of Port Dalny, died Oct.
S7 of typhus iever.
'It is difficult to single out indi
Vidua Is lor special mention among tho
heroic defenders."
PLEASES THE JAPAN 6Mb
•Inking of the Rastoropny Relieves
Embarrassing Position.
Chefoo, No^. 18.—The three Japu
Use
torpedo boat destroyers wliuii
entered the harbor during the morn
ing to ascertain if the Russian torpt
do boat destroyer llastoropny was hen
disappeared for a time, but reappeaied
In the afternoon. The Japanese consul
sent a cutter out to meet them and
informed the nearest destroyer, the
Kasurui, that the Rastoropny had been
sunk. The consul says this was the
first thw ships knew of the sinking ot
the Rastoropny. The Kasurui trans
mitted the information by wireless
telegraphy to the Japanese flagship,
Whereupon the destroyers disappeared
ift the direction of Port Arthur.
The sinking of the Rastoropny Uy
the Russian# relieved the Japanese of
an embarrassing position. A repeti
tion of the torpedo boat destroyer
Kyeshitelni incident would have arous
ed indignation, while a failure to de
stroy or cut the Rastoropny out would
have appeared like admitting previous
Wiong doing.
ALONG THE TAITSE RIVER.
Japanese Fortifying Their Second Line
of Defense.
General Kuropatkin's Headquarters,
Nov. 18.—The Japanese, according to
the Russian scouts, are heavily forti
fying their second line of defense
along the Taitse river. The major por
tion of the skirmishing of the laM
lew days has been around the village
Of ansintoundi. Some Japanese and
Russians who had .gone unarmed to
the same spring of water had a hand
to-hand fight. There were pkmly of
broken heads, but not one on either
Side was killed.
The health of the Russian troops,
With the advent of the cold weather,
It splendid. There are few cases of in
fectious diseases and the hospitals are
no longer crowded, most of the sick
and wounded having been sent north.
JAPS MUST BEGIN FIGHT.
Russians Will Not Assume Offensive
South of Mukden.
IMukden, Nov. 18.—If there Is to be
«nr activity at the front is the near
1
MPS NIGHTLY ATTACK PORT AR.
OCCUPYING PITS CON
VEF*S£ WITH EACH OTHER
FREQUENTLY.
m&ao. No*. 1*.—Figfitlng at Port
Arthur has taken place nightly since
the Japanese began their general as
Sftuh on Oft. 2G. according to Captain
Aon berg, a pilot, who was a passenger
oi the Russian torpedo beat destroyer
Rastoropny.
The Japanese trenches, the captain
says, are close to the forts on Rihlung
and Keekwan mountains and to other
forts on the northeastern group.
The sharpshooters of both sides, oc
cupying the pits, conversed with each
Uher frequently and make truces in
„,order to borrow cigarettes or to relieve
their cramped limba.
The Japanese are displaying great
energy in the construction erf trenches
*«lul the mounting of guns.
All the railroad steamers belonging
to the Russians, except the steel screw
transport Amur, have been sunk by
Japanese shells.
The hospital ship Angara, formerly
a transport, has been sunk in shallow
Water. The patients are still oa board
tfee shiy and are comfortable.
One day last week a hospital ship
Moved loo near the battleship in the
tin i bor, wheieupon the Japanese drop
ged small shells around her with the
Obvious purpose of warning her away.
The ship took the hint ana wlien siie
Was outside the zone of danger lar^,.
Shells began tailing near the battle
aiUjps.
REPORTS JAP REPULSE.
fav«r« Fighting Cccurred at Port Ar
thur Oct. 26.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 18—General
Stotssel, in his uispatches to Empeio.
Nicholas, reports tne repulse of a jap
auese attack Oct. 2t» on the north from
of Port Arthur. The Russiau losses
were 4«0 killed or wounded. Ail ihe
attacks Nov,
J,
the day the anniversary
ot the emperor's accession to the
throne was celebrated, were repulsed.
General titoessel was slightly wound
ed iu the head during one of ihe latest
assault* on Port Ailtiur. The text oi
Genera! titoessel's dispatch of Oct.
'follows:
"We have the honor to report to
your majesty that the Japanese bom
barded very vigorously, Oct. 25, oui
lotts and entrenchments north and
northeast. The follow wing day they
aiso attacked one of the forts on the
north side, but our heavy artillery and
KT..:v K i' eui tuai me nmiAci«
must be taken by the Japanese.
is is reported that the .Japanese are
i con entrating stior.g fortes on their
I
THUR SINCE GENERAL AS-
SAULT BEGAN.
TQ6ETHER
FQ&HES CLOSE
leii and center, undoubtedly with the
realization that they must be assured
of speedy success before attacking, as
it w ill be impossible^ for their armies
to lemain in the field without shelter
©wing, to the bitterly fold nights.
The Russians have greatly strength
ened their positions and hope to bold
Mukden through the winter.
WEATHER EKYREMELV COLD.
Eoldierk of Both Armies Driven to
Their Dugouts.
Mukden, Nov. 18. Four days' sharp
cold has silenced the artillery and in
fantry fire between the opposing posi
tions and has driven the soldiers into
the dugouts along the entire entrench
ed line. The apparent impossibility
for either side to eject the other from
their burrows and the fact that iu the
event one side succeeded in advanc
ing it could not dig the other out oi
its an ton men on account of the frost
seems to promise a winter's inactivity,
although the Japanese three days ago
made a small reconnaissance toward
the extreme east and pushed back the
Russian cavalry a few miles as though
they were investigating the possibili
ties for a flanking movement. It seems
Impossible that either side in any case
could more than occupy its opponents
winter quarters. The wells along the
lines are dry and both sides use the
Shakhe river, where the soldiers ap
proach unarmed and get water undei
recognized mutual sanction not to fire
on a single soldier. Here the noble
art of war is confined to fisticuffs and
swapping cigarettes, jackknives ami
food, all of which are prized. Famili
arities are Inevitable where long line?
are in continued contact. The armies
have now been stationary for
NORTH SEA INQUIRY.
Fishermen Can Give No Reason foi
Russian Attack.
Hull, Eng., Nov. 18 --The third dajf
of the boaru of trade iuquiry into Ui»s
North sea incident opened with reit
erations of the oft repeated story thai
there were no Japanese, no guns and
uo ammunition on board the trawlei
fleet and that the fishermen could con
ceive of no reason why they had beeu
attacked. None of them had been ask
ed by any Japanese agency to do any
thing, nor hal any of them seen a
Japanese or strange warship of an
description in the North sea with tht
exception of the Russians. One wit
ness admitted that, on seeing iht
North sea hospital trawler Alpha with
extinguished lights he had remarked,
"There's a torpedo boat." Crossexanr
ined by Dr. Wood house, counsel repre
senting the Russian embassy, ihe wit
ness said he was positive it was not a
torpedo boat, but he was not sure il
was the Alpha. He never before had
seen a trawler with all her lights ex
tinguished.
AMERICAN NURSES RETURN.
Speak Highly of Their Treatment by
the Japanese.
San Francisco, Nov. 18.—Dr. Aoita
McGce and lift eight associates of th«
American Red Cross society who havt
returned from Japan, where they serv
ed with distinction as nurses to the
wounded soldiers, say they received
every attention and were honored iu
every way possible during their stay
in the country by officials and repre
sentatives of the Japanese army. Be
fore they left they were given a fare
well reception at which a large nutnbei
of dignitaries were present. The way
they performed their duties in the
hospitals won the highest praise from
the surgeons at Piroshima, the receiv
ing hospital tor all the Japaueso
wounded in the war, where they were
Stationed. Dr. McGee, before leaving,
was given an audience by the emperor.
Until Battle Fleet Arrives.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 18.—As a result
of the dispatches received from Lieu
tenant General Stoessel the war office
expresses confidence that Port Arthur
will be able to hold out till the arrival
of the Russian second Pacific squad*
ran.
•fella From African Pert.
Dakar. Africa, Nov. 18.—The Rus
sian second Pacific squadron, bound
for the Far East, sailed from here
Wednesday evenlgr.
ESTABMSHEIl IKtttt MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA FRIDAY, NOYKMBKR IH. \*m
BO
long
that they are drawing supplies of fuel
and horse forage from the distant rear,
all other supplies being exhausted.
NEGOTIATIONS CONTINUE.
Ne Indications of Dead look in North
Sea Affair.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 18.—The facts
do not warrant the report that Count
Benkendorff, thy Russian ambassadoi
to Cireat Britain, may be recalled on
account of the present hitch in tht
Anglo-Russian North sea convention.
Russia has taken exception to the lan
guage of the Knglish text of the ai
tide relating to fixing the blame and
has proposed some modifications, but
there is no evidence yet that a dead
lock has been reached. The admiralty
is undoubtedly exercising influence
upon the foreign office in the matter.
The Novoe Vremya contends that tin
English text goes beyond The Hague
conference, which only provides for a
commission to determine the facts and
in no sense to make an arbitral award
London, Nov. 18.—The Associated
Press learns that there is no justifica
tion whatever for the sensational de
ductions made in the London Daily
Telegraph s dispatch from St. Peters
burg from the delay in signing tht
Anglo-Russian North sea convention.
Russia has accepted in principle Iht
international commission, but the ex
act text of the convention must be tht
subject of agreement between the two
powers. The present difference xon
cerns small details of the wording ol
the agreement as submitted by Greal
Britain for Russia's consideration.
V* Mrla* rirtPlOLYi
Small Death Rate CsuSSd by Japanesi
Bullets.
San Fiancisto, Nov. 18.—Dr. M. No
gasi of ToKio, who t.as peisonally at
tended many of ilu- Jaiiantse and Rus
sian wouuce'l iu the hospitals of Japan
since the begmuing ot hostilities, is
here on his way to London to lead a
paper hefoie a sac iety ol surgeons there
ou bullet wounds and their treatment
during ihe prestnt wai. He expresses
surprise at ihe way wounds inflicted
by the small bullets used by the Jap
anese heal and the small death rate
which they cause. The Russian bullet
used is far more dcadlv. he savs.
Brecktnrio'ge May Recover,
Lexington, Ky., Nov. 18.—Colonel W.
C. P. Breckinridge, who was stricken
with paralysis Wednesday and for a
time was in a critical condition, is
pronounced to be slightly better. His
speech partially returned and physi
cians now hold hopes of recovery.
GENERAL PUBLIC BARRED.
IVork ef Selecting a Jury to Try Nan
Patterson Continues.
New York, Nov. lb.—With lour of
I he twelve men who are to decide her
fate already selected the trial of Nan
Patterson, the former show girl charg
ed with the murder of Caesar Young,
the wealthy horseman, was continued
in the criminal branc of the supreme
court during the day. The greatest
caie has been used in the examina
tion of talesmen and the exhaustive
questioning and almost indiscriminate
challenging for even the slightest
cause indicated that not only might
another full court day or even more
be consumed in filling the jury box,
but that the panel of 100 talesmen
might be exhausted before Ihe task
was finished.
Thus far the general public has been
Shut out entirely from the proceedings,
only those having a direct connec tion
with the case being allowed to enter
the courtroom.'
AFTER DESPERATE BATTLE.
Ons of the "Cody Bandits" Captured
in Wyoming.
Thermopolis, Wyo., Nov. 18.—After
a desperate battle between the two
bandits, who have been given the
title "Cody Bandits." as a result or hav
ing murdered ('ashler Middaugh of the
Cody National bank and three men
who recognized them as the much
sought outlaws, the larger of the pair
was captured in the Big Stone valley,
north of heie.
Details of the fight are meager, but
it is said that the man now held an
swers well the description of the fel
low who doled out death to the bank,
cashier. It is supposed that the small
er robber eluded the three-man posse.
it is also thought here that the
"Cody Bandits" are the ones who com
mitted the oaring holdup of a saloon
and gambling deu in this town.
For a time the bandit was in danger
of being lynched by the citizens of
this place. A large crowd gathered
and a lynching was freely discussed,
but finally Ihe crowd gave up its plan
for want of a leader.
STUDENTS ON A
4
MAN HUNT.
Sequel a Hazing Scrapc at the Wis
consin University.
Madison, Wis., Nov. 18.—For several
hours a crowd of 1,000 students of the
University of Wisconsin engaged in an
organized man hunt, the object of their
wrath being Walter R. Mason, a stu
dent oi Brookline, Mass., who shot A.
G. Grunert of Chicago, another stu
dent, in a hazing escapade Saturday
night. Mason cheered for the Minne
sota football team.
The mob was gathered on the univer
sity campus by a dozen leaders, who
fired guns and received the hundreds
of students who came running up by
saying: "We're going to c-leau out
Mason for shooting Karl Grunert. We
mean business and want only fellows
with no yellow streak in them to come
along and help."
The mob went to the home of Aug
ust He heibel, where Mason boarded,
and after breaking into the house
searched it from attic to cellar. He
could not be found.
PROMOTOR PLEADS GUILTY.
At 8ecos*!d Trial Acknowledges Fraudu
lent Use of Mailt.
Des Moines, Nov. 18. Letson Bal
liett, who gained wide notoriety a
couple of years ago as a promoter of
the White Swan Mining company of
Oregon, suddenly terminated his sec
ond trial in the district court for
fraudulently using the mails, by plead
ing guilty. The first trial resulted in
a convi'tion after a hard fight, but
the second trial was ordered by the
higher courts.
Serious Reeulta ef a Jeke.
St. Paul, Nov. 18.—Peter Welter is
in a critical condition at Bethesda
hospital as the result of a joke played
upon him at his home. As Weber
was about to sit down to lunch the
milkman entered the kitchen and iu a
spirit of fun pulled Mr. Weber's chair
away. Mr. Weber Is a large man and
he fell heavily to the floor, injuring
his spine. He was unconscious several
hours,.
Third Victim of Wreck.
Grand Rapids, Mich., Nov. 18.—J. L.
Smith of Grand Rapids, who was in
jured in the Pere Marquette wreck
near Elmdale, died at the hospital
here from his burns. He is the third
victim of the wreck. Ralph Savoy
of Grand Rapids is in a critical con
dition and not expected to live. He
Is badly scalded and has a broken leg.
Killed by Shot From Ambush.
Birmingham, Ala., Nov. 18.™W. S.
Lang, superintendent of the coal mines
of the Tennessee Coal, Irou and Rail
road company at Bloc ton, who was
Bhot from ambush last Saturday night,
is dead. Lang was a native of Peon
sylvania, but came to Alabama soma
months ago from Virginia.
The only hl«h grade •akinaCowgar
made at e moderate prtge.
Calumet
Baking
Powder
If a woman ever gets
HO
homely she
isn't worth looking at. she'd better
take Hollister s Rocky Mountain Tea.
Brings back the bloom of youth. 35
ccnts. tea or tablets. -Frank Smith.
You cannot cure piles by external ap
plication. Any remedy to be effective
ruiist be applied inside, right at the seat
of the trouble. ManZan is put up in a
collapsible tube, with a nozzle, se that
it reaehps inside and applies the retnc cly
where it is most needed. ManZan
strengthens the blood vessels and nerves
so that piles are impossible. ManZan
relieves the pain almost instantly, heals,
soothes, cooU and cuius. Stoddard
Halstead.
'I hat awfn! grinding, i*«!n in
the back is from the kidneys. A dor-e
of Pinenlc.s will cure it over night.
Pineules is a new disdovery put lip in a
new way. A delightful remedy and
Hpecfic for all Kidney and bladder
troubles. Stoddard tV ilaletead.
Sour Stomach
t: i-CBtftS H! .. I A I. :i\
i i -r 1 n i -i
for the last two »ar». 1 Imvf b«'-n taking nifili
cineand othtT drugs, but could And ao relief only
for a short time. Twill recommend C'ascarets to
my friends as th« only thitu for Indigestion and
sour stomach ami to keep the bowelts iu Kuuil con
ditio 1 are \, ry nice to eat." 1
Harry Stuckley, Mauch CbODk, Pfc
Beit Tor
The 5owels
CANDYCATHARTIC
Pleasant, Palatable, Potent. Taste Good, Do Oood,*
Never Sicken, Weaken or 10*, SSc, 50*. Nevet*
sold In bulk. The genuine tablet stamped 1 C.I
Guarnnt.*«d t-A v»nr
SUTliiv, Remedy Co., IIICHL'"OI N.Y. 599
ANNUAL SALE, TEN MILLION BOXES
PALL
PAPERING
I Cook & Odee's
a v e e a s s o e
their stock of Wall
Paper for the Fall
Season. They are
showing some
handsome designs
which are sur© to
please.
n asjaoutj
cocnKicoo
iinro:
eootirG
I File Your Winter
order!for
HARD and SOFT
prices*
a
COAL
now to insure prompt a
delivery. i
We carry the best
grades at
A
lowest
e
a
S. Y. HYDE
ELEVATOR CO.
JOHN THEOPHILUS. Aft.
Phone
31.
Dray Line.
BES1 OUTFITS IK HE 6ITT.
All kinds of Draying done
promptly also moving
household good A. Piano &
Safe loving a specially.
•Ji
Stomach
Troubles
cured by
KDOI
DYSPEPSIA CURE
Under all curable conditions
T-'r.
D. K.ubk
W. V-.' Lay
of Hilllard,
Nevada, O., was
e :red by Kodol
o s o a
trouble wh ..f
h-td effected
I..3 heart.
Pa., was cured
o n o
Dyspepsia by
use of
MjmUWIMI TWI
Cal
ache.
Sick headache, nervou* bead
ache, tired headache, neuralgic
headache, catarrhal headachc,
headache from excitemcnt, in
fact, headaches of all kinds are
quickly and surely cured with
DR. MILELS*
Pain Pills.
Also all pains such as backache,
neuralgia, sciatica, rheumatic
pains, monthly pains, etc.
"Dr. Miles' Pain Tills are worth their
'weight in gold," *.ays Mr. W. D. Krea
nu-r, of Arkansas City, Kan. They
cured my wife of chronic headache
when nothing else would."
"Dr. Miles' Tain Tills drive away
pain as if by magic. 1 am never with
out a supply, and think everyone
should keep them handy. One or two
pills taken 011 approach of headache
will prevent it every time."
MKS. JUIXJK JOHNSON, Chicago, III
Through their use thousands oi
people have been enabled to at
tend social and religious func
tions, travel, enjoy amusements,
etc., with comfort. As a prevent
ative, when taken on the ap
proach of a recurring attack,
they are excellent.
Sold by alt Drucilttt#
23 DOM*. 25 cent*.
Dr. Miles Medical Co., Elkhart, Tnd.
J. J. FITZGERALD.
nnmiaaafflnnrinnnnnnnnnfiifciyannn—inr nnnnmn 11 irinriri»a«Mnwr
Coal Coal s
BEST GRADES OF
HARD and SOFT COAL
I Order now for later delivery. I
I CITY DRAY LINE
Phone 53,
J.
AAUUAAOBBGNNIABOQBGBNQAAAAUUU^'JJU'JUUUUAUNNNHQQCBBAEES
4 4 4 4 4 A A A A 4 A A A 4 4 4 A 4 4 A 4 4 A 4 A 4 A A A
WW WW wWWW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW WW
THE FALL FASHIONS
in
Cloaks, Jackets,
Suits & Skirts
may be seen at
I J.J. DAHL S SON'S STORE
I The line is new and up-to-date, and
prospective buyers are invited to inspect
it. We promise very low prices.
WWW^^yv WW
WW WWW
WVWWwWW WWWWW
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^^FWVWV
CI1A5. B. KBNNUDY,
President.
Fancy China
I have a fine assortment of Fancy
China including Dinner Sets, Chamber
Sets and Fancy Lamps and many pieces
ofHavelin ware. Our novelties include
many pretty
1904
selling them on a close margin.
THE HADISON
fladison, S. D.
F"a.rm Loans at LoAfgi
URATES-*-
A new theory that is proving success
ful in the euro of Concha, Lung and
Bronchial affections is •offered in Bee'H
Laxative Honey and Tar. Thw remedy
cuts the imiciia, hcal.s tJio intwibianouw
lining of the throat, lun^ and bronchial
tubes wards oil* Pneumonia mid Klrent(th
ens tho system generally. Croup and
Whooping Cough diappear bofore its
e as snow before th»» sunshine of
spring. It's jlMWBt.-^toddird A
liftlbtead.
If
ntrrE FTVE texts
MALONEY. I
J*9-!*J *V4*
.-, -.. k¥
WW WW
„UO«JD EM.ZRRUP
P"
i,
'"Co/
••'a'' •.*»
*f
"ft," -f*
=t^
v &
1
i"v!r
r: o
a
•«'V
"-•i i" -.
1
patterns, and I aid
TOM CAREY,
O O E
C. L. KENNED*.
Vice Pre«fdeHt.
MiiAl •I'juoh HOI
HOLUSTER'S
i Rocky Mountain Tea Nuggetf
A Busy Medio) as lor Busy Poopl*.
Brians Golden Health and Renewed Vigor.
A specific f1'Coiistiituuoti, l»i1ig«Ntioa,
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\9joj uoucd|j«uu.) jjiu pu«f)
Troubles. 1'iinple.s, EczMna, Impure
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ani
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I
LFTN.I.IXTKK
ORI.'O COMJ'A.N'V, Madison, Wia.
*01 DEN VUGGETS FOR SALLOW PE«?|g
:.i
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