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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 19, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1904-11-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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ESTABLISHED IHJKI
R5 V
i'.r
fi MATTER OF HEALTH
^AkiH^
POWDER
Absolutely Pure
HAS MO SUBSTITUTE
NEAHLYA SCORE DEAD
TERRIFIC EXPLOSION OP TANKS
Iff OAS CHARGING STATION
AT CHICAGO,
WTLDiN6S
IN THE VICINITY DAMAGED
STRUCTURES SEVERELY SHAKS.N
AND RENDERED UNFIT FQH
OCCUPANCY.
Chicago, Nov. 19.—Twenty-two gas
tanks iu the big railroad gas charging
station at Seventy-third street aud
South Chicago avenue exploded dur
ing the day. Bight dead bodies of em
ployes have been removed from the
ruins and it is naid that about ten more
•mployes are missing.
The tanks were of the style attach
ed to railroad cars for lighting pur
poses. Eleven of the tanks exploded
la
rapid succession and were followed
ftt short intervals by the other tanks.
The fire spread among property of liie
People's Gas l.ight aud Coke company
and threatened to reach the large stor
•i»e tanks of that company. Poli'-e
men weie sent about for a tadius of a
suite wamiBS pel sons to move ftmu
tfceu homes.
To prevent the explosion of the gafc
ill i lie mammoth tank Superintendent
iia.pii Weils oiaeied the waste pipes
O^cuoti. Mae pipes lun outside of me
p.aut and in a short time the lug
tanks were dis haiging the gas into
the air. This was a dangerous under
taking, but it was chanced and, prwv
ing successful, prevented a larger tie
stiuction of property.
Across South Chicago avenue, di
rectly opposite the gas stoiage builu
lag. was a large coal shed stored with
coai used in the manufacture of gas.
The huge coal pile was ignited and in
a few moments was beyond control.
Supply Pipes Finally Shut Off.
When the danger of the laiger tanks
exploding had been reduced to a min
imum L'niet Engineer Eustace, with
several assistants, entered the grounds
and shut off the supply pipes troni th«
ruined buildings to the large tanks,
lie said it was almost uiiiaculous thai
the lire had not entered the laiuei
tanks.
Buildings along Greenwood avenue
'Within a block of the place were so
severely shaken that many Will no
longer be fit for occupancy. A two
story building at Seventy-third street
and Greenwood avenue was totally
wrecked.
The property at South Chlcagp ave
nue and Seventy-third street, occupied
for gas manufacturing and storage, is
several blocks in length. About 1«J0
men are employed in the district. Oue
of the victims was blown through a
wall 100 feet away from the building
In which he was at work. He was fear
fully crushed, but may live. He said:
"I was working about one of the gas
tanks when the first explosion oc
curred. The ground trembled and
seemed to heave upward wheu, sud
denly, there was a rip and a roar and
1 don't remember what occurred after
that until 1 came to in the street about
100 feet away. I know there were for
ty men in the place and I don't be
lieve many of them escaped."
The explosion may have been caused
fcy a search for leaks in supply tanks
made by one of the employes.
ate in the afternoon it was said
that only five persons were killed and
a score injured.
ONE OF THE CREW PERISHES.
freight Steamer Mohawk Burns in
Long Island Soud.
T^kll River, Ma^s., Nov. 19.- Tha
Fall Kiver liue steamer JJoston arrived
here during the day with the crew
ot tie Central Vermont freight steam
er Mokawk, which was burned i«
Long Uiand sound duiing the night.
Tne.e weie twent-iwo people ou
board the .UohawK, including tw
women. All were rescued except th6
wauhmao. The Boston effected the
rescue shortly beloie 1 o'clock in the
luo.inr.g and at that time the Mohawk
wa^ hopelessly burned and shortly aft
eiwa.d theie was an explosion which
practically completed the work ot de
strut tiou, although the hulk remained
afloat.
The Mohawk had a cargo of general
merchandise. She plied between New
York and New London, Conn. The
rescued party left Fall Kiver for New
GREAT JUEiLEE BANQUET
Republican Leaders Will Gather IN
Neiv Yc.k f.ov. 30.
New \oxt. iw,. in* U.iiiifer
which i.iou ui ue nuj i.a.e
speeches lui me ucyui-.b -suss
iu the tt«.ei«i -c u g.ve at
I the WaiUoi uu ittc ui*hi of
I Nov. 20, t"icsiueut iwifeeveii is ex
pected to be the gittt,t ol hjnor. The
'entire lit si liooi oi tiie noirfi has been
engage i. Secreta.y ot aiaie John
Hay, Senator C. W. Fairbanks, Chair
i man Cortclyou, Governor Odeil, Gover
uor-elect Higg.ns and a store ot He
publican statesmen of national fame
have been invited.
President iioosevelt has not indi
cated whether he will attend or not.
lie is going to St. Louis just before the
date set, but, as he wllh remain only
one day at the exposition, according to
present arrangements, the committee
in charge of the dinner hope to pre
vail upon him to accept.
The affair is to be known as the
Roosevelt and Fairbanks jubilee ban
quet. It will be the biggest political
dinner held in this city for many years
Some of the famous professional speak
ers will be called, it Is mM,
or two-minute speeches.
for
REVIVAL OF BUSINESS.
Eastern Railroad Reinstate Thousands
of Employes.
New York, Nov. 19.—A revival of
business on the railroads entering this
city has, according to statistics gath
ered by the Herald, resulted within the
last six weeks in the re-employment
of more than 20,000 men who were
dropped from the payrolls during a
period of a few months ending with
June 1 last.
In this list the Pennsylvania com
pany, which made the most sweeping
reductions, is estimated to have taken
back on its systems 11,000 men, the
New York Central has restored 6,000
more, the Reading system in the neigh
borhood or 2,000 and the independent
lines as many more. At every rail
road office in New York and Philadel
phia the statement was, "running on
full time iu every department" or "will
be running on full time very soon."
In addition to this the railroads,
which were compelled to economize in
the purchase of freight cars during
the dull period, have all ordered new
equipment.
IN BUREAU O9 CORPORATIONS.
Lutiter Conant of New York Named
Special Examiner.
Washington, Nov. 19.—Luther Con
ant, Jr., of New York has been ap
pointed n special examiner iu the bu
reau of corporations, department of
commerce and labor. Mr. Conant has
been for some years financial editor
of the Journal of Commerce and Com
mercial Bulletin of New York and as
such has become thoioughly familiar
with the general conditions ot indus
try, commerce and finance and the
particular facts and conditions with
regard to industrial corporations en
gaged in interstate and foreign com
merce. lie also was employed by the
industrial commission to assist in the
completion of certain information re
garding industrial combinations and
to furnish suggestions for methods of
Investigation.
SHAW CALLS FOR FUNDS.
Withdraws Portion of Government De
posits in Banks.
Washington, Nov. 19. Secretary
Shaw has announced a call upon na
tional banks holding government de
posits to the amount of 25 per cent of
their holdings, 10 per cent to be paid
on or before Jan. 15 next and 16 per
cent on or before March 15 next.
This, the secretary estimates, will
bring into the treasury about $25,GQ«J,
000.
This will make a working balance
of approximately $50,000,000. The call
includes all the banks except a few
active depositories where the amount
of the deposit is relatively small as
compared with the amount of business
handled for the government.
NEW PRESIDENT CHOSEN^
Governor Pardee of California Head
of Irrigation Congress.
El Paso, Tex., Nov. 19.—The national
irrigation congress has adopted the
report of the committee on permanert
organization as submitted. The new
president. Governor Pardee of Califor
nia, took the chair and made an ad
dress. All the officers recommended
by the committee were elected. The
convention adopted a resolution thank
ing President Roosevelt for his let
ters and for his interest in irrigation
and approving his policy on this sub
ject.
The executive committee was em
powered to act as committee on cre
dentials at future meetings in order
to save time and expedite the conven
tion work.
MONUMENT TO M'KINLEY.
Fund of Six Hundred Thousand Dol
lars Raised.
Chicago, Nov. 19.—Announcement
was made during the day of the torn
pletion of the fund of $600,000 for the
erection of a national monument to
the late President McKiniey. Alexan
der H. Itevell. chairman of the Illinois
state auxiliary of the McKiniey Na
tional Memorial association, in a »ts
port submitted to the state committee,
stated that $50,000, the proportion al
lotted to Illinois, had been raised.
In New York next Tuesday the na
tlonal trustees of the association will
meet Mid adopt design for
tfee
ument.
mon­
Farmer Ground to Pieces.
Prairie do Ohlen, Wis., Nov. 19.—
Andrew Priuhett, a farmer, aged flfty
four, whose home is in the town of
Marietta, was killed and his body
ground to pieces under the wheels of
a westbound passenger train at Bridge
port. Fiagrneuts of his remains weie
MP**
l*"
tome quo uuussi.
APPARLI: CASE OF MUilDER AND
SUICPJZ IS DISCOVERED AT
WYANDOTTE, MICH.
IflCTiHS RESiGE:t OT liTRQIT
SUPPOSEO MURDERER A BARTEN­
DER AND HIS COMPANION A
MARRIED WOMAN.
Detroit. Nov. 19.—Two night police
men in Wyandotte, twelve miles down
the river from Detroit, early in the
day discovered a horse and buggy
standing at the corner of Fourth aud
Oak streets with H. J. Hillebrand and
Mrs. W. J. Miller of Detroit lying
dead in the buggy. Both were shot
through tl.e head and it is considered
by the authorities to be a clear case
of murder and suicide. Whether Hille
brand or the woman fired the shots
is unknown. A letter found on Hllle
brand's person, written him by the
woman while he was in Chicago a
short time ago, told of an intimacy
between the two and warned Hille
brand that he must be careful of her
husband, who, she said, had threaten
ened to shoot him if he returned here.
Both bodies were slightly warm when
taken to the undertaker's soon after
their discovery, indicating that the
shooting took plate a comparatively
short time before they were found.
Hillebrand was a bartender. Mrs.
Miller had been married only a year
and a half. Her husband says he be
lieves her refusal to elope with Hille
brand caused him to shoot her and
commit suicide. Miller says his wife
told him that Hillebrand had threat
ened her life once before when she
reiused to accompany him to Chicago.
VICTIMS OF BURGLARS.
Detroit Policeman Killed and Special
Officer Wounded.
Detroit, Nov. 1SJ.—Patrolman John
Daley was shot down and murdered in
cold blood about midnight bf one of
two burglar whom he detected at
work iu the rear of William Diedrich's
store at 25 Michigan avenue. Herbert
H. J'ickelJ, special officer for the Mich
igan Central railioad, was shot through
the abdomen aud probably fatally in
jured when be ran to the policeman's
assistance.
The murder occurred in the heart
of the business district of Detroit. Pa
trolman Daley's revolver was found
within a few feet of the store window,
which the burglars had partially open
ed. He ha 1 evidently turned to fol
low his assailants after he had receiv
ed a mortal wound through the chest
and fell on liis lace a few yards off
in the direction which his assailants
had taken.
The patrolman's cry for help and the
noise of the shooting awoke the neigh
borhood and the desperadoes, pursued
by a constantly increasing crowd, dart
ed westward, zigzagging between I.a
fayiMe avenue and the alley that par
allels the avenue half a block north
ward. Officer Pickell was a leader in
the chase, having been within a block
of the scene when he heard the shot
that killed Patrolman Daley.
Picket] had followed the murderers
nearly four blocks when they stopped
near Lafayette avenue and Third street
and shot him through the body. The
bullet entered his abdomen and passed
out near the bark bone. Having fired
seveial more shots and effectively in
timidating the pursuing crowd the fu
gitives escaped in the direction of the
railroad yards that lie west of the
Michigan Central and Union depots.
HELD BY CORONER'S JURY.
Adolph Weber Charged With Murder
ing His Family.
Auburn, Cal.. Nov. 19.—in the Weber
case the coroner's jury has brought in
the following verdict.
"We find that Julius Weber, Mary
Weber and Bertha Weber came to
their death by pistol shot wounds and
it is the belief of this jury that said
wounds were inflicted by Adolph J.
Weber.'
The same verdict applies to Ches
ter Earl Weber, with the exception
that it states that the wounds were
made by some blunt instrument in
of by pistol shots.
GIRL SHOOTS HERSELF.
Dog Leads Father to the Body in
Grove Near Home.
Willmar, Minn., Nov. 19.—Olga Lin
fors, the daughter of Jones Linfors of
Lake Lillian, committed suicide by
shooting herself in a grove near her
father's house.
Mr. Linfors was awakened by his dog
which ran about the house whining
and batking. He at length got up and
opened the door and followed the dog
to the grove, where he found the dead
body ot his daughter with a bullet
through her heart.
No one knows the cause of tile young
woman's rash act
HUNDREDS FIGHTING FIRS*
Flame* Raging in ths Forsats Near
Peoria. III.
Teoria, 111., Nov. 19.—The forest fire
raging in the Illinois bottoms, seven
miles north of this city, has now de
vastated seven square miles of terri
tory. The country side is filled with
small game driven from their lair by
the (lames. Hundreds of farmers have
been attracted to the scene and are
lighting the flames. Few farm build
ings tukva tMM& d«Mroistf»
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 190*
A friend of tne Home
A foe of the T»uat
Calumet
Baking
Powder
WeSerete in »nee-wi#a*e puree i food*
If a woman ever jyets so houiely she
isn't worth looking at, she'd better
take Hollister's Rocky Mountain Tea.
Brings back' the bloou* of youth. Bi
cents, tea or tablets. -Prank Smith.
Yon cannot cure piles* by external ap
plication. Any remcdytto be effective
must be applied inside, r^ght at the seat
of the trouble. ManZan is put up in n
collapsible tube, with a nozzle, se that
it reaches inside and applies the remedy
where it is most needed. ManZan
strengthens the blootl vessels and nerves
so that piles are impossible. ManZan
relieves the pain almost instantly, heals,
soothes, cools and cures.—Stoddard fc
Halstead.
That awful grinding, stabbing pain in
the back is from the kidneys. A dose
of Pinenles will cure it over night.
Pineules is a new disdovery put up in a
new way, A delightful remedy and
specfic for all Kidney and Bladder
troubles. —Htoddard & Halstead.
LAZY LIVER
"I find Cabarets so eonrt that I woold not b»
vithout tlieua. 1 n a» IrouMad a great deal with
i
torpid liver and hradaclie. Now since taking
Caii'areta Candy Cathartic 1 fee! very uiurh better
I shall certainly recommend thetn to taf frieuda
as the b^st medicine 1 have ever aeen."
Anna Baiinet, Oaborn JLill No. S, Fall Hirer, MM*.
Best
For
Lumrno
i Bowels
CANOY CATIWTIC
Ptowant, IV rvwJ DoOoo*,
W**' bi(*k?n, U, »kr-n nrciri|i-, !«•. 2T(\ 58c. SpvnT
jo'd iu bulk. Tli" eon'line tnl!'.t pta'.iped (J C.
til.arHiiKujd to inn or your iti'mcy liack.
Sterling Remedy Co., Chicago or N.Y.
6oj
ANNUAL SALE, TEN MILLION BOXES
FALL
PAPERING
Cook & Odee's
a v e e a s s o e
their stock of Wall
Paper for the Fall
Season. They are
showing some
handsome designs
which are sure to
please.
aaaaoa^oEflGnone-rjrnjnnttnn 3
File Your Winter
orderjfor
HARD and SOFT
now
COAL I
delivery.
s
a
to insure prompt a
We carry the best
lowest 1
prices. 1
grades at
S.Y.
I
13
JOHN THEOPHILUS,
e
amiaaa
mer,
0
HYDE
ELEVATOR
CO. I
e
Agt. S
i 5
e Phone 3if
otgobc bqgkibb
•JMHaMiin
J.
Dray Line.
BES1 OUTFITS II TIE CfTY.
All
I GtORGE
Stomach
Troubles
cured by
[email protected]
s
DYSPEPSIA CURE
Under all curable conditions
Mr. Double of Mrs.W. W. Lay
N-,vada, O., waa ler of Hilliard,
cured by Kodol
of stomach
ti ouble which
Pa., was cured
of Chronlo
Dyspepsia by
the
US# of
KODOL
DUetttWhat You Eat
Head
ache.
Sick headache, nervous head
ache, tired headache, neuralgic
headache, catarrhal headache,
headache from excitement, in
fact, headaches of all kinds arc
quickly and surely cured with
DR. MILE.S*
Pain Pills.
Also all pains such as backache,
neuralgia, sciatica, rheumatic
pains, monthly pains, etc.
'i)r. Miles' Pain Pills are worth their
weight in gold," says Mr. W. D. Krea-
of Arkansas City, Kan. "They
mred my wife of chronic headache
when nothing else would."
"Dr. Miles' Pain Pills drive away
pain
as if ly magic. I am never with
out a supply, and think everyone
should keep them handy. One or two
pills
taken on approach of headache
will prevent it every time."
Juduk JOHNSON, Chicago, III.
Through their use thousands of
people have been enabled to at
tend social and religious func
tions, travel, enjoy amusements,
etc., with comfort. Asaprevent
ative, when taken on the ap
proach of a recurring attack{
they are excellent.
Sold by all Druggist**
25 Doits, 25 c«nt«,
Dr. Miles Medical Co., Elkhart, Ind.
4
"t
HARD
a
kinds of Draying done
prompt!} also moving
household foods. Piano &
Safe loving a specialty.
sum.
1 Phone
CttAS. ft*.
A new theory that is proving success
ful iu the cure of Cought*, Lung and
Bronchial affections is offered in Bee's
Laxative Honey and Tar. This remedy
cuts the mucus, heals the membranous
lining of the throat, lungs and bronchial
tubes wards
off Pneumonia and strength
ens the system generally, ('roup and
Whooping Cough disappear before its
use aa Bnow before the sunshine of
pleasant.—Stoddard »V
spring
jt
*JT i £21&.•" A.
V' 4
mk*
'r&'n
5,
0
caaaaaaanDnDfUonaDDB
ocaauaa DQonnr eonnoo
a juuuuuiaatMiaaa1
Coal Coal
BEST GRADES OF
and
Fancy China
I I have a fine assortment of Fancy
China including Dinner Sets, Chamber
Sets and Fancy Lamps and many pieces
ofHavelin ware. Our novelties include
many pretty 1904 patterns, and I am
selling them on a close margin.
TOM CAREY,
»t s.' \t,
PRK E FIVE CENTS
SOFT COAL
Order now for later delivery*
CITY DRAY LINE
68, E. J. MALONEY.
auuuiaauBoncirjnnccnncnciuaLi'juuLjjjJUJiuaauuiacnciHnniccciocc
THE FALL FASHIONS
In i
Cloaks, Jackets,
Suits & Skirts
may be seen at
IJ.J. DAHL & SON'S STORE
i
The line is new and up-to-date, and
prospective buyers are invited to inspect
it. We promise very low prices
THF
AAAAAAAA A AA AA AAA
fc£NN£DY,
President.
THE flADISON
State
Had 150n, S. 0.
Farm Loans LoWf*t
I '•RATES*-
*r-.
trA*
,, VI' I1\'
& & •. *V'- V-
GROCER,
C. L. KENNEDY.
Vice Pr«*ld«nt.
coui *U*J O U O Jt s
uoj uorj«dn*uo3 pa«iv
v»*«a UIM wmpiy.:
HOLLISTCR'S
Rocky Mountain Tea Nuggtt$
Boay Medioln* for Buy Fwplt
Briags Ooldea Health and Keiewed Fifor.
A s(*vific for Const iriatlon, IndJgaatkw, Ltv«
an«l Kulnt-y Troubles, rlmpkis, EdeenM. ImpuN
Bl'ixi, Had fireuth. SIuKgwh Bowels, Haadaeba
ani Hackaehe. I o Hovky MouataU Tea la tab.
let form, 35 a box. Gmiiiae nada tlf
iloL!.i*r«tR Prkj Compant, Madison, Wis.
QOIOEN VUQGETS FOR SALLOW K0K§
ST-
5S$
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