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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 21, 1904, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1904-11-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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ESTABLISH Kl 1UIIU
*1^
V
8ATTLE IN full SWING
RUSSIANS AND JAPANESE NEAR
MUKDEN SAID TO BE DES-
PERATILY ENGAGED.
jsi,
CMFlllMTItt K UtDIt
SPECIAL DISPATCHES SAY THE
THUNDER OF ARTILLERY
IS UNCEASING.
~\'S
Rt. Petersburg. Nov. 12.—It to re
ported that a battle between the two
armies before Mukden is In full swing.
The war office does not confirm the
rumor, though It admits that the ac
tivity all along the line indicates that
both armies
nr/a
ready.
The RuasiaJfS, according to General
Kuropa! kin's report, are pressing the
Japanese left, while a significant move
went of the Japanese is reported at
Bintsintln, forty-five miles east of
Mukden.
A special correspondent
says
The spirit of the troops is excel
lent. It is difiicult to establish any
distinction as regards bravery. All are
beroes. The bombardment of the for
tress continues without intermission."
Oeneral Stoessei praises the work
of the ambulance and hospital corps,
Went ions a number of officers for dis
tinguished bravery and concludes:
"1 he Japanese losses were enor
mous. 1 estimate them at 10,000."
OCLIVERED TO RUSSIANS.
Torpedo Boat Destroyer Recently
Completed in England.
New York, Nov. 21.—A remarkable
story comes from the Glasgow corre
spendent of the American to the effect
that a torpedo boat destroyer of great
s|)e-d, built in an English shipyard,
has been delivered to the Russian gov
ernment and that Burke-Roche, ex
member of parliament from Ireland
and a few years ago well known in
society and club life in New York, had
command of the boat during its voy
age through the Kiel ship canal to
Libau, on the Baltic.
According to the correspondent de
tails of the matter were brought to
Glasgow by members of the boat's
crew who have returned from Russia
aboard a merchant vessel.
REPORTED BY 8AKHAROFF.
Russians Dislodge Japane|Q From
Several Positions.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 21.—General
SakharofT, undeV date of Nov. 18, re
ports' a reconnaissance on a large scale
Nov 17 in the direction of Maikai
and Chitatse, on the light bank of the
Hun river. The Japanese showed some
resistance, but were dislodged from
their villages and from the bridges
across the Hun river. At daybreak
the same day the Japanese repulsed
a squadron of Cossacks thirty miles
south of Sunsintin.
AGAIN ATTACK POUT ARTHUR.
Japanese Occupy Several Important
Positions.
Shanghai, Nov. 21.—The Japanese
resumed their attacks on Port Arthur
on Nov. 17. making a furious assault
whi resulted in their occupation of
underground chambers i& important
®lie
the
battle has begun and that the thunder
t»f the guns is unceasing.
SftVERE ARTILLERY FIRE*.
Delayed Dispatch Indicates Battle Is
Imminent.
Mukden, Friday, Nov. 18, via Peking,
Nov. 21.—A severe artillery Are was
opened on the Russian right, commenc
ing at daylight today and.lasting for
several hours. There was also inter
mittent firing during the day. The
Russians are expecting a general at
tack oo the part of the Japanese.
Late Nov. 17 the Japanese opposite
Lund Tree hill attempted an advance
under the cover of artillery and reach
ed a small village between the posi
tions, but, according to accounts from
the field brought by head^uai ter's
Couiiers, they were repulsed with lar^e
casualties. The Japanese made simul
taneous attacks along the railway, Imt
they are reported to have been without
result..
JAPS LOST TEN THOUSAND
GENERAL STOESSEL REPORTS EN-
EMY REPULSED IN ASSAULT8
ON PORT ARTHUR.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 21.—General
Btoessel, In a dispatch to tfce emperor
dated Nov. 14, says:
"I am happy to report to your ma
jesty that all the assaults from Oct.
£5 to Nov. 2 were repulsed by our
beroic troops. The most desperate as
sault occurred Oct. 30, but thanks to
the bayonets of the reserves and the
fciavery of the volunteer sharpshoot
ers the enemy was repulsed at all
points. The Japanese did not return
to the attack the same day and left
a large number of dead uninterred on
the held.
"On Oct. U the enemy twice assault
ed, but each time was repulsed at the
loint of the bayonet and by hand
grenades. Several of our officers and
wen were wounded.
Watching the Russian Fleet.
81
mon Towu, Cape Colony, Nov. 21.
•-The British cruiser Barrosa sailed
from here during.the day. it is b#
lleved her destination is Walfish bay
(on the west coast of German South
vest Africa I and that her object is
to watch the approaching division of
tfce Hussiau second Pacific squadron.
PETITION TO THE CZAR.
Kussisns Desire a Direct Votes ill Mm
Government.
St. Petersburg," Nov. 21. The day
may mark a red letter in the Russian
calendar. About 100 representatives
of provincial zemslvos assembled pri
vately at 2 p. m. with the avowed pur
pose of presenting to Emperor Nich
olas, thtough Interior Minister Svia
topolk -Mirsky, a truthful picture of the
'nternul conditions of Russia coupled
with recommendations pointing out
In plain terms the necessity for call
ing a legally empowered constituent
assembly to have a direct voice in the
government. The word "constitution,"
however, will be carefully avoided.
The Liberals have been greatly ex
cited by the developments of the last
few days. The meeting was to be
held at the duma. or city hall, but at
the last moment official auspices were
refused, tbe emperor withdrawing his
consent.
Many of the zemstvos' representa
tives attribute the -peror's attitude
primarily to the i?Taenee of Grand
Duke Sergius, M. Pobedonosteff, the
procurer general of the holy synod,
and M. Sassonoff, a member of the
council of the empire, and indirectly
to such reactionaries as Merchersky,
Strumer and Suchinsky. The two lat
ter were the late Interior Minister von
Plehve's assistants, who were promot
ed to the council of the empire. When
Prince Sviatopolk-Mirsky dispensed
with their services the spectre of the
constitution was successfully raised,
according to their view. They are
not disposed to criticise Prince Svia
topolk-Mirsky, whose good intentions
they do not question. They believe
he is powerless, but nevertheless they
express disappointment at the fact
that he yielded.
At tne meeting In the afternoon
seven of the ten articles composing
the prepared memorandum were adopt
ed. These sections declares that the
"abnormal conditions in Russia are
the result of the complete estrange
ment of the government and people,
due to the absence of essential, requi
site mutual confidences." These sec
tions also dedaie that the conditions
necessitate freedom of conscience,
speech, press and the privilege of
meeting in union and assert that the
peasants must be placed on an equal
ity with the other classes.
REFUGEES FROM VLADIVOSTOK.
Russian Warships There Said to Be
in Bad Shape.
Chetoo, Nov. 21.--The steamers
Taiping and Progress, carrying 1,000
Vladivostok Chinese, arrived here
during the day. They report that the
former British steamer Allanton left
Vladivostok laden with ammunition
Nov. 12 in an attempt to run to Port
Arthur. Another source says the
steamer Victoria, laden with provis
ions, has succeeded in running the
blockade of Port Arthur.
A passenger of the Taiping says
the Russiazi protected cruiser Bogatyr
is held up by pontoons at Vladivostok,
while two other warships are less se
riously damaged, it is not known how
the damages were received.
The Japanese are pouring provis
ions, ammunition, clothing, etc., into
Newchwang in view of the approach
of the time when tbe ice will close
the river.
PRACTICALLY CONCLUDED.
Negotiations on Subject of Anglo-Rus
sian Convention.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 21.—The nego
tiations on the subject of the Anglo
Ituss-ian convention are practically
concluded. Only one small minor
point remains to be settled and that
is of such slight importance that For
eign Minister Lamsdorff and Ambas
sador Hardinge this afternoon will dis
cuss the question as to how and where
the signatures are to be exchanged.
In substance the change in the lan
guage regarding the determination of
the lesponsibility by the international
commission will make the convention
provide for the location of any blame
which Is found to exist upon any
persons of Russian, British or foreign
nationality.
Will Join Rojestvensky.
#ew York, Nov. 21.—Another report
is current, says a Herald dispatch
irom Si. Petersburg, that four Argen
tine warships have been bought
through a French agent and will join
Vice Admiral Rojestvensky s fleet, thus
giving him a strong preponderance
over the Japanese fleet.
Movement of Russian FMnt*
Fakkeburg. Denmark, Nov. 21.—Aft
•r coaling the second division of the
Baltic squadron sailed northward dur
ing the morning. A Danish gunboat
and a torpedo boat accompany the
H®et In Danish waters.
Demonstration at Moscow.
Moerow, Nov. 21.—Popular demon
strations occurred here during the day
owing to the refusal of the authorities
to authoilze an official meeting of the
zemt vos' representatives at St. Peters
burg.
Another Unsuccessful Attack.
Mukden, Nov. 21 Another unsuc
cessful attack on Port Arthur waa
ttftde Kmr. Sis
U'uonovan Kosaa at Queenstown.
Queenstown, Ireland, Nov. 21.—A
numerous deputation, accompanied by
a band, went out on a tender to meet
O'Donovan ltossa, who arrived here
on the Cunard line steamer Etruria
from New York. The deputation es
corted Mr. I ossc ashore.
GIFT OF THE KAISER
BRONZE STATUE OF FREDERICK
THE GREAT UNVEILED AT
WASHINGTON.
IREAT MiUTA&Y AID OFFICIAL EVENT
PRESIDENT, GERMAN AMBASSA­
DOR AND OTHERS DELIVER
ADDRESSES.
Washington. Nov. 21.—Hailed by a
military blare of twenty trumpets the
bronze statue of Frederick the Great,
presented to the American people by
Emperor William, wa3 unveiled during
the afternoon by the Baroness Speck
on Sternburg, the wife of the Ger
nian ambassador. The ceremony wa^
marked by great military and official
display. The statue was presented on
behalf of the emperor by his personal
envoy, the German ambassador, who
made a brief address. The president
made the chief address of the day
and accepted the gift on behalf of the
American people. Remark^ were made
by Lieutenant General Chaffee, chief
of staff Major General Gillespie of
the general staff, master of ceremo
nies Lieutenant General von Lowen
feld, one of the special commissioners
sent to the unveiling by the emperor,
and Charlemagne Tower, American
ambassador to Germany.
Seldom has the national capital wit
nessed a more brilliant and distin
guished assemblage than was gather
ed on the grand esplanade of the army
war college around the pedestal of the
statue. Immediately back of the sta
tue on the president's stand, which
was completely covered in red, white
and blue bunting and decorated with
American flags, sat the president and
bis cabinet, the German ambassador
and the Baroness Speck von Stern
burg, Lieutenant General von Lowen
feld and Major Count von Schmettow.
the emperor's special commissioners
to the unveiling, and the entire dipio
inatic corps, all in full uniform. On
stands to the right and left of the
statue were officers of the army and
navy in full dress uniform, the mem
bers of the supreme court, members
of congress and other invited guests.
Directly in front of the pedestal of the
statue were grouped the members of
the German societies from various
parts of the country.
Within the gates of the army war
college along the line of march to the
esplanade were stationed the troops
in attendance.
Batteriae Render Honors.
Two batteries of field artillery were
stationed in the south battery of the
post and upon the arrival at the gates
of the several groups the prescribed
honors were rendered.
The official programme began with
the invocation by the Rt. Rev. Di
Satterlee, bishop ot Washington. Ma
jor General Gillespie, the presiding
officer of the day, then delivered an
address-
As he closed his address Major Gen
era! Gillespie turned to the ambassa
di ess and, ottering her his arm, es
cotted her to the edge of the statin
where were fastened the silken cords
attached to the American and German
flags in which it was shrouded. Grip
ping the cords firmly, one in each
band, the ambassadress had but to
give one tug before the silken i'old
loosened from around the figure of
Frederick the "Great. Straightway
twenty trumpeters of the army drawn
up in front of the president's stand
sounded a military blare of welcome
one prolonged note—and as the flags
slowly parted, the American to the
right the German to the left, the
rine band struck up the German nit
tional anthem.
Lieutenant General von Loweafeld
was then presented by the master ot
ceremonies and, as the special com
missioner of the German emperor,
transferred the statue to the custody
of his majesty's personal envoy, Baron
Sternburg. the German ambassador.
Baron Sternburg was introduced by
Major General Gillespie and accepting
the custody of the statue from thi•
commissioners, formally presented tin
gift, on behalf of the emperor, to the
American people, through their pres
Ident. in a brief speech. After the
president delivered his response the
assemblage arose and with uncovered
heads remained standing through the
playing of "America" by the Marine
band. Speeches followed by General
Chaffee and Ambassador Tower and
the ceremonies closed with benedic
tion by Rev. Paul A. Menzel, pastor
of Concordia Lutheran church.
H&TTENTOT UPRISING.
Further Native Trouble! in German
Southwest Afriea.
Cape Town, Nov. 21.—A dispatch
from Upington, on the Orange river,
says that two women who have ar
rived there give details of a Hotten
tot rising in German territory. Their
husbands and a number of other Dutch
farmers were brutally murdered, but
twenty three women and ehldren es
caped and reached Re
it font
tltute circumstances.
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA MONDAY. NOVKMIiKK i 1 I
el
n IS Ms
Indications of Murder,
Chicago, Nov. 21.—William Bate, a
chaffeur, employed by Daniel Canary,
proprietor of a g: age here, was found
dead in an automobile two miies south
east of Lemont. It is thought thai
the man was murdered. There was a
bullet wound in the back of his head
and his body was hanging over the
aide of tbe automobile.
FALL
PAPERING
Cook
& Odee's
•V
a v e e a s s o e
their stock of Wall
Paper for the Fall
Season. They are
showing some
handsome designs
which are sure to
please.
rsta
Line.
Dray
BES1 OUTFITS I) T0E (ITT.
All kinds of Draying done
promptly alao moving
household good*. Piano
6t
Sale "loving a specialty.
1
hat awful grinding, stabbing pain in
the back is from the kidneys. A dose
of Pinenles will cure it over night.
Pineules is a new disdovery put up in a
new
way. A delightful remedy and
spectic for all Kidney and Bladder
troubles. Stoddard & Halstead.
("bbbbb
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a
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PH
EOEcrin srrtr/ aa'jaasiauuucjafrnr.r.nr.^Baii
I and
••••»•••••••»»*eeeee»eee»eeeeee»ee»»e»e»»eeee»«eeee
Thib is the Season of the Yeair to
Beautify
make it
Winter
aauaadunaonBBQBnnncBQBtaiaB a a
I File Your Winter
orderjfor
HARD and SOFT
the Home
cheery for the
Months
Nothing adds so much as
HANDSOflE PICTURES!
White Bros, have them in lovely de
signs suitable for any room in the house.
Gome and see them. Pictures framed to
order.
WHITE BROS.,
FURNITURE and UNDERTAKING.
i
COAL
I
n now to insure prompt
delivery.
We carry the best
grades at lowest
prices.
S. Y. HYDE
ELEVATOR CO.
Art.
JOHN THEOPHILUS,
Phone 31.
®u£jauQyarRnEX buuquu r.nrsfcfjr. o
You cannot cure piles by external ap
plication. Any remedy to be effective
nnist be applied inside, right at the seat
of the trouble. ManZan is put up in a
collapsible tube, with a nozzle, se that
it reaches inside and applies the remedy
where it is most needed. ManZan
strengthens the blood vessels and nerves
so that piles are impossible. ManZan
relieves the pain almost instantly, heals,
soothes, cuot» and curi-9. Stoddard
Halstead.
1
CtaDt#
J. J. FITZGERALD.
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Order now for later delivery.
CITY DBAY LINE
I Phone 53, J. MALONEY. S
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I THE FALL FASHIONS
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may be seen at
J. DAHL & SON'S STORE
The line is new and up-to-date, and
prospective buyers are invited to inspect
it. We promise very low prices.
Fancy China
I have a fine assortment of Fancy
China including Dinner Sets, Chamber
Sets and Fancy Lamps and many pieces
ofHavelin ware. Our novelties include
many pretty 1904 patterns, and I am
selling them on a close margin*
TOM CAREY,
•eeeeeeeee-eeee+e eeee»e»»»»»»»#ee
KENNEDY,
President.
THE flADlSON
State
riadison, S. D.
Farm Loans at Lowest
-URATES'*-
DR5. BETTS & BETTS
Office
in Johusoii a iiiock.
I
OSTEOPATHS. hollister-S
Dr. Han
Dr. Dade's Little Liver Plltoevre Lfta:
Pilla.—Stoddard Halntcad.
W
WW wwww
THF OROCER.
C. L.
KENNEDY.
Vice
President.
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mfucjj uonvdiiKuo.} ipuvQ
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I A Baay Medioia# for Bu»y ?MjpU.
uuh Bcttft m&kl) at senses of WOUOtl] firinw Golden Health and Ren
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and children a specialty.
i
linn§8 Golden Health and Renei
'«i Vi|w.
A for OViiistipai ion, Indigmtioa,
(uri'i Kctlney Troubles, Pimples. Ecaaaw, Impure
BI.kkL Biul Breath, Slutftfish Bowels, Ha*dache
Mid Backache. It's Rocky Mountain Te* in tub
K"t form. ,'("1 cfut* a box. ti,-nuine made by
H.h.u«tkr Dki o Company, Madison, Wis.
401DEN iUGGETS FOR SALLOW PEOPLE
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