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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 28, 1908, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1908-09-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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HASKELL BACK
TO OKLAHOMA
No Longer Treasurer of Dem=
ocratic Committee.
CONFERS WITH IK. BRYAN
Hearst Charges Undoubtedly Die
cussed, but Parties at the Meeting
Refused to Be Interviewed on the
Subject—Selection of a Successor
Up to Chairman Mack and the Na
tional Executive Committee.
Chicago, Sept. 28.—Governor C. N.
Haskell of Oklahoma to all intents and
purposes no longer is treasurer of the
Democratic campaign fund. He is on
his way back to Guthrie, Okla., aftei
a forty-five minute conversation with
W. J. Blyan.
At his desk in Democratic head
quarters sits J. B. Doolin, the assist
•ant treasurer, on whom the routine
business of the office will fall until
a successor to Mr. Haskell is appoint
ed.
Mr. Haskell, still treasurer in name
though not in fact, went to the train
alone. His hurried departure he said
was due to the necessity of his pros
ence at the state capital when the
state tax board meets. Asked if hp
would prosecute those who had made
charges against him he wrote in an
swer: "Read the law you will en
know the limit."
He had asked, he said, that his res
lgnation take effect immediately. A?
to whether Mr. Doolin would resign
he referred inquirers to the gentleman
in question. The latter had nothing
to say.
BRYAN MEETS HASKELL
Conference Is Secret and No Details
Are Given Out.
Chicago, Sept. 28.—W. J. Bryan
spent two hours in Chicago apparently
without changing in the least the sit
uation brought about by the resigna
tion of Treasurer Haskell. However,
Mr. Bryan and Mr. Haskell were clos
eted at the Auditorium Annex for
three-quarters of an hour and although
no announcement was made at the
conclusion of the conference It was
taken for granted that the situation
brought about by the charges of Pres
ident Roosevelt, and W. R. Hearst
were under discussion. It was hot
and when Mr. Bryan came out in a
hurry to catch his train beads of per
spiration stood on his brow.
Asked whether Mr. Haskell's resig
nation had been accepted so far as
he was concerned Mr. Bryan declined
to answer. That it had been, howev
er, was inferred from Mr. Bryan's an
swer to the next question.
"Has a successor to Treasurer Has
kell been selected?" he was asked.
"That is up to Mr. Mack and the
executive committee," came the hur
ried answer.
Although Mr. Bryan had a number
of other cullers it may be safely stated
that so far as Mr. Haskell's case is
considered the conferees were Mr.
Bryan, Mr. Haskell, Assistant Treas
urer Doolin, James W. Riley, who is
Mr. Mack's secretary, and John E.
Lamb. Mr. Lamb, after the departure
of Mr. Bryan, called for a few min
utes at Treasurer Haskell's office. He
was extremely uncommunicative re
garding details of the mornihg's work.
He was not aware, he said, that Mr.
Haskell was under discussion at all.
STANDARD OIL SECRETS.
Stenographer Suspected of Furnishing
Letters to Hearst.
New York. Sept. 28.—It is stated in
Wall street that the officers of the
Standard Oil company have not yet
found the hole through which the
Archbold correspondence leaked.
It was suspected that the letters
Which William R. Hearst read from
time to time during the past week
were obtained from a woman stenog
rapher who was dismissed some time
since by the oil company. Apparent
ly she had only taken copies of let
ters, because it is stated that an ex
amination of the files show that the
criginals are still in possession of the
company. Consequently the oil trusi
officials are in the dark regarding the
additional letters Hearst may have.
It is noted that the expose so far
merely covered the period between
1899 and 1903. Hearst says he has
more letters. It is rumored they are
of more recent date and mora Interest
ing than those already read.
ftirl Employes Evicted by Fire.
C&icago, Sept. 28.—A sudden Are
In the gas mantle factory of the Lind
say Light company drove 400 girls
from the building in panicky haste..
Some came down the fire escape, but
the majority escaped by the stairway.
Aside from a few bruises there werej
no serious injuries. The property loss
waa small.
1 DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE FOR
GOVERNOR OF CONNECTICUT
A. HEATON ROBERTSON.
UNKNOWN VESSEL SUNK.
Run Down in Long Island Sound Dur
ing Fog.
Newport, R. I., Sept. 28.—In the
midst of a dense fog which enshroud
ed Long Island sound the Fall Rivei
line steamer Commonwealth collided
with an unknown vessel off Race
rock, sinking the latter and sustaining
considerable damage herself, while
proceeding on her regular trip from
Fall River and Newport to New York.
The crew of the unknown vessel was
taken on board by steamers in the
vicinity. The Commonwealth waa
able to proceed to New York slowly.
GIRL DIES, MOTHER
AND BROTHER SUICIDE
Bodies of Three Found in
Nome at Brooklyn.
7
New York, Sept. 28.—The bodies ol
Ella and Edwin Soden and of their
mother, Mary Soden, were found in
their apartment at 258 Green avenue,
Brooklyn, the mother and son evi
dently having committed suicide to
gether in their grief over the death,
from apparently natural causes, of
Miss Ella Soden.
The body of the latter was dressed
in white and apparently laid out for
burial, while the bodies of her mother
and brother were found in an inner
room on a bed together with the bed
clothes pulled over their heads. A
strong odor of chloroform pervaded
the ronm.
A letter written by Edwin left no
doubt as to a double suicide plot be
tween him and Mis mother.
Neighbors say they had not seen
any of the family around for several
days. They kept very much to them
selves during all the time they had
lived among them and so nothing was
known concerning their affairs. So
den was believed to be a newspaper
artist.
BECAUSE OF THE CHOLERA
Manila Postpones Formal Welcomo to
Battleship Fleet.
Manila, Sept. 28.—As has been pre
viously predicted the formal welcome
to the battleships of the American
fleet has been postponed on account
of the presence of cholera in this city.
The committees in charge of the re
ception, after a conference with Gov
ernor General Smith and a number of
prominent business men, decided that
1'. would be wisest and safest to cancel
all preparations for the celebration
until the fleet returns from Japan in
November. In honor of the fleet's
presence, however, the conference
concluded to carry out the water par
ade on the day of arrival.
Governor General Smith Is advising
the authorities at Washington of the
development of strong criticism direct
ed against the health authorities oi
the city because of the fact that Ma
nila was not protected by quarantine
and closer protection of the districts
where the cholera has claimed the
greatest number of victims. It is
probable that an investigation will lie
demanded.
Sheldon Will Not Resign.
New York, Sept. 28.—Chairman
Hitchcock of the Republican national
committee deprecated rumors that oth
er resignations, in particular that of
National Committee Treasurer George
R. Sheldon, might follow that of T.
Coleman Du Pont, head of the speak
ers bureau, whose resignation has
been announced. "I know of no other
resignations," Mr. Hitchcock saidL
•nor any contemplate!.*
$1000.00
Given for any lArtautt
in­
jurious to health found in food
resulting from the u*e of
Calumet
Baking
Powder
MRS. RICE TELLS
OF SUICIDE PACT
Says Davis Agreed to Kill
Dr. Rustin of Omaha.
LATTER TOLD HER PLANS
Declaroo Davio Agreed to Shoot the
Physician on Condition That the
Latter Gave Him Enough Poison to
End His Own Life—Attorneys for
Davis Repeatedly Object to the Evi
dence, but the 8tory Is Finally Told.
Omaha, Sept. 28.—Following a legal
battle continued throughout the giving
of her entire testimony Mrs. Abbie B.
Rice was permitted to tell of the plans
between Dr. Fredarick Rustin and
Charles E. Davis, whereby Davis wa*
to shoot the physician and then com
mit suicide. Many fine points of law
came up during the clashes that fol
lowod each question, but the slate
finally secured the testimony of the
witness, with which it hopes to prove
Davis guilty of first degree murder.
The quostioning elicited that Mrs
Rice saw Davis In Dr. Rustin's of
flee twice on the evening preceding
the killing. Taking up her story at
this point Mrs. Rice was permitted tc
tell what happened up to midnight.
She said:
*'l)r. Rustin told me he had secured
a man to kill htm and that I was re
leased from the duty. He said it was
a man who had several times attempt
ed to take his own life. The doctor
told me he had arranged to have thir
man do the shooting on condition that
the physician give him enough poison
to take his own life. He said Davis
was to come to the office at 8 o'clock
that evening.
Rustin Secures the Poison.
"By appointment I went to Ruatln's
office at 8 o'clock and found Davis
there. I stayed only a short time.
The doctor sent to the drug store for
a bottle of aconite. He poured half
of it into another bottle, giving me
one portion and putting the other In
his pocket. He then told me to go
to the street corner, where he would
meet me shortly. I did so and he
came down on the street with Charles
E. Davis. They waited until the first
car came, when the doctor put Davis
on the car going west toward his home
and then joined me.
"We walked to within a block of
his house, the doctor stopping once to
purchase some whisky. We talked ot
his plans with Davis. I shuddered
with every mention of them, but the
doctor talked freely. When within
two blocks of Dr. Rustin's home he
bade me goodbye, saying for me tn
wait awhile. He told me if his plans
did not work he would soon join me
again. I waited quite a while and
then went down town. I called up
Dr. Rustin's home repeatedly after I
got back, but was told the doctor was
not there."
BIG PROFITS IN CORN.
3horts Unable to Produce Grain Con
tracted For.
Chicago, Sept. 28.—Several fortu
nate operators who are long of Sep
tember corn, having purchased in July
and August for September delivery,
are preparing to pocket the snug sums
which promise to accrue from shorts
estimated to be involved for more than
3,000,000 bushels. Only three business
days remain in this month for the
shorts to produce the corn or the cash
and Indications point to the Impossi
bility of getting the corn.
September corn is selling at 80
cents. The shorts contracted sixty
and ninety days ago at prices ranging
from 63 to 65 cents. According to pit
gossip J. Ogden Armour, W. H. Bart
lett and one of the Pattens are among
the big shorts who sold for September
delivery at prices from 15 to 18 cents
below those now prevailing.
Efforts to Save the Yankee.
Newport, R. I., Sept. 26.—The work
of extrication of the United States
cruiser Yankee from her position on
Spindle rock, where she struck during
a fog on Wednesday, is centered in
the construction of a wooden coffer
dam about the vessel. It is planned
by this means to free the vessel from
surrounding water, following which
the work of assisting the cruiser from
1$m rook will bo begun.
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, M()*il)AY, SKPTKMHEK 28, 1908
«amctaMhayfrfl ITT——-T «m|
Cooking Exhibit
ALL "WEEK
Sept. 28 to Oct. 3
/OO
RENSCH
iST
The Monarch
RANGE
Actually Pays
for Itself in
Cold Cash!
I
FOR ONF WHOI Wl FK
yjlx V/ilL
Tfll\/I_L
Remember Exhibit
REARRANGING SCHEDULES.
Western Roads Propose to increase
Freight Rates.
Chicago, Sept. 2i .-Tle Tribune
says:
In spite of the fact that the Eastern
railroads have agreed to postpone any
general increase in freight rates until
after the presidential election shippers
are becoming alarmed over reports
regarding the Western roads. These
lines, it is said, are quietly cheeking
up their ratos with the idea of mak
ing considerable advances within the
next few months. It Is understood
the transcontinental roads already
have decided on a number of advances
in rates to the Pacific coast to b£
made effective on Dec. 1. While no
official announcement has been made
it is said tariff sheets are now on the
press, which include increases in com
modity rates amounting to from 7 to
10 per cent. The rates on steel from
Chicago to the coast are said to have
been raised from 75 to 80 cents per
hundred pounds.
LOSS OF LIFE TS SMALL.
Typhoon in Philippines Did Great
Damage to Property.
Manila, Sept. 26.—More extensive
reports regarding the typhoon that
swept, through the central section oi
the Philippine group have been re
ceived. indicating that while there was
great damage to property the loss ot
life 'would be slight. The gale de
stroyod the town of Gnbagan, on the
Island of Samar, leaving many home
less. The town of Romblon, on the
island of the same name, was badly
damaged. Tacloban, in Eastern Leyte,
with a population of 5,000, suffered
serious injury. A number of vessels
are reported driven ashore at various
points. Some were refloated and the
crews of the otherB rescued without
loss of life.
Lieutenant Rowell of the Philippine
constabulary was drowned in the surf
off Vigan, Northern Luzon.
Belfast Spider Dead,
•wwerville, Mass., Sept. 26.—Isaac
O. Weir, who, as "Ike" Weir, the Bel
fast Spider, won the featherweight
boxine: champoinship of the world
twenty years ago, died at his home in
this city after an illness of nearly
tferet years. Ha loavea a widow.
IStay S&tisfactory'JhjHfe
are.g°ing
ffLLll
to
Monarch Range, made of malleable iron and steel, does the work quicker without damage from breaking,
cracking or warping that comes in the use of other kinds. They stay tight and solid, even after a lifetime's
use,
and give the same economical service. A demonstrator direct from the factory will be at our store dur
ing
the exhibit, who can tel! you all about the superior points to better advantage. You will not be urged to
buy—simply
examine the range. An experienced lady cook will be present to give you hints on cooking and
serve coflee and biscuits prepared on the Monarch.
Enamel ware and nickeled ware freee.
Crist Rensch
The Hardware Man
ON THE CHARGE OF
GRAND LARCENY
Members of Failed Brokerage
Firm Arrested.
New York, Sept. 26.—The sensa
tional failure of A. O. Brown & Co.,
one of the largest brokerage houses
In this city a few weeks ago, fur
nished another sensation when the
four members of the firm were ar
rested on a charge of grand larceny. I
The arrests were made at the conclu-1
slon of a hearing in the investigation
Into the firm's condition, which has
been in progress several days under
the direction of ex-Congressman
Charles E. Llttlefleld, who had been
named as received of the failed firm.
The specific charge on which the
warrants were Issued was made by
Miss Helen Abernethy. She declared
that a few days before the failure of
the firm she had purchased twenty
s-hares of Missouri, Kansas and Texas
stock, valued at about $600, and twen
ty-five shares of United States Steel,
valued at $1,1S4, and left it with the
firm of A. O. Brown & Co. for safe
keeping. She alleges that the stock
now is not in the possession of the
receiver aor U U la the rnapnnr'ir
oJBcas.
Situation Much improved.
St. Petersburg. Sept. 28.—The mu
nicipal hospitals report 312 new cases
of cholera and 153 deaths for the past
twenty-four hours. This is a distinct
improvement over the preceding
twenty-four hours. Among the deaths
are a daughter of Privy Councillor
Smirnoff and another student Qt Ute
Pavlovsk military academy.
Ohio Campaign Opened.
Manslield, O., Sept. 28.—The Ohio
•tate campaign was launched here at
a monster meeting attended by Dem
ocrats from all over the state. Issues
of the campaign were discussed at
length by various candidates for state
offices, including Judge Harmon, can
4Mete lor gortrmm
of Madison and vicinity Some New Points in Steel Ranges. The
Begins MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, for One Solid Week
Special Offer: To any person buying a
MONARCH RANGE during the exhibit we will
fresent them with a set of cooking utensils of
CHAS. B. KENMEDY
President
•St
Cooking Exhibit
ALL WEEK
Sept. 28 to Oct. 3
CRIST RENSCH
DV reducing fuel bills 25 to 50
•J per cent
DV saving one quarter of the
time usually spent in the
kitchen.
DV eternally doing away with
nearly ALL of the disa
greeable labor necessary to
keep the common range
half way presentable.
Built Right—of
MffllEABLE IRON AND STEEL
devote our time and energy to showing the ladies
THE
Madison State Bank
MADISON, S. O.
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO*
MILWAUKEE BEER
on draught at
FRED KURTH'S,
J, S. MURPHY*
HEAGNEY & MUNSONS
Prioate stock, Wiener style, Bottl^ beer
all Leading Saloons in the city*
L. J. AHMANN, Agent,
De Witt's Carboi zed Witob Hazel Salvi
is recommended as the beet thing to use
for pile*. It is, of course, good for any
thing where a salve is needed. Beware eate and is pleasant to take. Itisguar
If i natation*. Sold by Holllday Porter aatewi.—J. H. Andiunaofe
+vi
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C. K£AiNEDY.:
Vice President
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it
Foley's Orino Liaxative is a new rem
edy, an improvement on the laxatives of
former years, as it does not gripe or naus-
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