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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, October 24, 1908, Image 1

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Royal
BAKING POWDER.
Comes from Grapes
The only baking pow*
der made from Royal
Grape Cream of Tartar
Imitation baking powders ire made from hifJi
mineral acidi and leave in the food
unhealthful properties
as%m
EVERY MEMBER
TO TAKE STUMP
Cabinet to Assist on Final
Week of Campaign.
IISIT DOUBTFUL STATES
Meet ef ttae 8peecHee PlinwHl
Delivered by the President's Official
Family Will Be Made in New York,
Ohio, Maryland and West Virginia.
Decision Reached at a Meeting of
the Cabinet.
Washington, Oct. 24,—As a
Of the cabinet meeting every member
of the president's official family will
i®d out some time next week to make
.political speeches in the states where
•here is doubt as to the outcome of
U»e campaign In favor of Judge Taft.
'The president earnestly considered
Hie entire situation with six members
tif his cabinet and at the end of the
®eeting it was learned that each of
'ttese officials next week will make
several campaign speeches.
Postmaster General Meyer will
lr-rve here Sunday next and will speak
*t Paulding. O., Oct. 26 Sandusky,
Oct. 27 Bellaire, Md., Oct. 29 Tren
ton, N. J., Oct. 30, and Boston, Nov. 2
The campaign engagements in Vir
ginia of Senator Depew, who was
scheduled to speak at Harrisonburg,
livnchburg, Norfolk and Suffolk, be
ginning Oct. 26, have been cancelled
Und the senator will take the stump in
ffcore doubtful states than Virginia.
Secretary Ropt, who expected that
lie would speak only in New York city
Hext Saturday, has been requested to
go into Ohio and assist in the cam
paign there. He will speak In Cincin
nati next Wednesday night and in To
ledo on Thursday night.
', Secretary Cortelyou will speak in
.' |jew York city next Thursday night.
He did not know in what hall the
Jfreeting will take place.
Secretary of War Wright will speak
Baltimore some night next week.
Jhe selection of the date is in th©
iands of the local committee.
ft
West Virginia will be visited by
Secretary Metealf next week. Just
jvhere he will speak and the date o?
^he meetings has not been deter
mined.
Attorney General Bonaparte will
|nake two speeches in New York city
|iext Tuesday, one in the afternoon
#nd one in the evening. The other
lembers of the cabinet, Secretaries
filson, Straus and Garfield, at pros
are on speaking tours.
«n»
-«|neri
"-^Wili
-V" $
a'
e-1.1
BRYAN IN NEW JERSEY.
Candidate Greeted by Crowds at Vari
ous Stops.
Phllllpsburg, N. J., Oct. 24.—In his
travels through New Jersey W. J.
fclryan was greeted by Immense, cheer
i
L,|ng
V
A s
•k
crowds. Previous to entering the
ftate he spoke at Wilmington, Del.,
'fcnd West Philadelphia. At the latter
enlace he referred to the fact that he
»f'*ras in fine physical condition and
Jkhat his TOice was holding out better
i a i j.
Absolutety
PURE
than those of the Republican speakers
because he was not putting any
ragged
arguments through his throat
Following the Delaware river into
Northern New Jersey the Democratic
(candidate got much amusement out of
President Roosevelt s letter on the
labor question by telling the people
I that the president has "butted into the
campaign again" and deposed Presi
dent Samuel Gonipers as bead of the
American Federation of Labor and
substituted for him Senator Knox of
Pennsylvania.
At Frenchtown he talked to a farm
er audience and, discussing the trust
question, said that in view of the
claims of the Republican party for th
prosperity of the farmer he expected
they would "now have a trust on the
pun and a meter on the clouds, with a
charge of so much for each shower."
TAFT AT INDIANAPOLIS.
End of Second Day's Campaigning in
That State.
Indianapolis, Oct. 24.—William
Taft concluded the second day bt his
Indiana tour at a monster rally in
this city. During the day he had
made a complete circuit of Indianap
rrtis, being about fifty miles distant at
all times. He made extended speeches
in Lafayette, Marion, Muncie and An
derson and ten to fifteen minute
speeches in Brazil, Greencastle,
Roachdale, Crawfordsville. Frankfort,
Ru hville, Kokomo, Greentown, Shir
ley, Knightstown, RussiaviUe and
Shelbyville.
At Lafayette, while riding to the
speakers' stand, Judge Taft had this
note thrust into his hand by a well
dressed man:
"Mr. Taft Twelve years ago
drove a mortgaged mule to this city
to hear Mr. Bryan speak. Today
rarae in my own automobile to hear
you. Can you guess who I am going
to vote for?"
THOUSANDS IN JEWELRY.
V
Two Little Girls Blamed for Nltmer
ous Robberies*
Beverley, Mass., Oct. 24.—Two littl«
girls, sisters, one of them twelve years
old and the other six, are accused bj
the police of a series ef robberies
here running over a period of threfl
months. The names of the childrer
are withheld by the police. It is said
that a search of a playhouse and
doll's trunk at the girls' home resultec
in the finding of jewelry valued at
thousands of dollars. The childrei
were allowed to make pocket money
by selling soap on commission and
this chance to visit various houses in
the town, the police say, was im
proved to make way with large quan
titles of jewelry.
Russian Military Executed*.
St. Petersburg, Oct. 24.—The Recb
has obtained and made public the offi
cial statement of the executions it
Russia during the year 1907 on sen
fences Imposed by the military dis
trict courts. The total is 627, of which
£4 were soldiers and 543 civilians.
These figures are considerably below
the earlier unofficial estimates, which
were based on the condemnations re
ported in press dispatches.
Two Dead and Five Injured.
Gowrie, la., Oct. 24—Two men Wfele
killed and five injured, one fatally, In
a wreck of a gasoline speeder on the
Newton and Northwestern near here.
The speeder, loaded with nine men
of Rinard, dashed into
a
had been
box car which
moved from
tha
a siding
main
line.
U5
oa
1 A|r V**1 rf" •*•. %,( *.&*•,, '!V ft
Xifjk,
SERIOUS FLOOD
IN SfTHWEST
Rivers of Kansas and Okla°
homa Out of Banks.
flFFEYVILLE INUNDATED
Many Residents of Kansas Town Com
pelled to Leave Their Homes and
Seek Safety—Twenty Thousand
People at Muskogee, Okla., Suffer
From Cold and Hunger Because of
Break in Gas Supply.
Coffeyville, Kan., Oct. 24.—The
flood situation In Southern Kansas is
not improved. North of Coffeyville
the Verdigris river continues to rise
and lacks only a foot of the high mark
of 1890, which was the highest known
for twenty-five years. Many persons
have been compelled to leave their
homes in the north, east and south
eastern parts of Coffeyville, where the
land is low. Forest park is covered
with two feet of water.
All the way from Neodeska and In
dependence south to Coffeyville the
Verdigris has spread out until it cov
ers thousands of acres of farm lands,
doing vast damage to corn in the
fields.
The Missouri Pacific was the only
railroad that was able to bring a train
into Coffeyville. The Missouri, Kan
sas and Texas tracks northeast of this
city and the Santa Fe tracks between
here and Liberty are both so deep
under water that no trains can get
through.
THOUSANDS WITHOUT FUEL
Oas Main Into Muskogee, Okla., Is
Washed Out.
Muskogee, Okla.. Oct. 24.—Twenty
thousand persons shivered in a cold
north wind in Muskogee without
breakfaBt or fire as a resuilt of the
washing out during the night of a gas
main across the Arkansas river here
Several railroad bridges have been
washed away and many passenger
trains are stalled near here.
Bartlesville, Okla., Oct. 24.—The
Caney river is two feet higher here
than at any time since 1885. Rain has
been falling along its valley almost
constantly for seventy-two hours. Bar
tlesville is cut off from communica
tion with the outside world except by
interurban electric line service. The
railroad bridge across the Caney river
has been greatly damaged by the
flood. North Bartlesville! i« under
fcur feet of water.
TUCKER'S SIDE OF STORY
Attorney for Army Officer Discusses
the Case.
Chicago, Oct. 24. -Lieutenant Colo
nel W. F. Tucker's side of the matri
monial discord which has been ex
ploited so much in the .press of the
country was told for the first time by
his attorney, Leo J. Doyle.
Mr. Doyle charged that the activity
of Mrs. Tucker in the courts was due
to a desire to force her husband to
give her money or its equivalent. He
said that he spoke for publication
with sincere regret, but that since so
many and such wry accounts of the
matrimonial differences of the Tuck
•rs had been published he felt called
upon to hold a brief for th® other
side.
Ho affirmed flatly that th«» suits
against Colonel Tucker in the munic
ipal court were not dismissed by MrB
Tucker's attorney because of any
scruples against prosecuting a sick
man, but that, on the contrary, the
action was prompted by unwillingness
to face certain revelations. He said
further that during the time that the
colonel's duties had kept him in Chi
cago Mrs. Tucker had continued to
live In Washington and that, there
fore, the charge of desertion, which
she is setting up, is absurd on its
face.
to
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$
Elkins Has Nothing to Say.
Pittsburg, Oct. 24.—In an extsnde
^conversation over the long distance
telephone with United States Senator
Stephen B. Elkins at Elkins, W. Va.
the Associated Press made a numbei
of pointed inquiries concerning th
reported engagement of his daughter
Miss Katherine Elkins, and the Duk€
of the Abruzzl. The attempt, hew
ever, to either secure a confirmation
or denial was unsuccessful.
Minister Accused of Bigamy.
Lamed, Kan., Oct. 24.—Rev. Dr.
E. Toms, a Baptist evangelist, wa«
trrested here on a charge of bigamy
brought by Rev. F. W. Gookin, pastoi
of the l^rned Baptist church. Toms
came from Tecumseh, Neb., where h«
had a wife and child. He declared he
obtained a divorce la Coloradt
Springs, after which he married a
widow in Great Bead,
JttaM0dilpaito
Kaa. fife
preliminary hearing.
"t UZ-
j?». i i '•. VT •"'7 i
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY. OCTOBER 24, 1908
COMPTROLLER'S NEW RULES
Bank Examiners Must Question All
Directors Hereafter.
Washington, Oct. 24.—To enforce
much great responsibility upon direc
tors of national banks and to make
them pay move attention to their in
stitutions Comptroller of the Cur
rency Murray has issued an order to
na ~\,baiik examiners directing
thA it
UJK)ii
W.
entering a bank to
ni examination to Immediately
the directorate and require
to a formal list of twenty
fchlng questions. These in
ire to be put by examiners to
rector and are designed to
ut clearly the relation of the
direct
mi
cam
ansi
five
quir
each
bring
O
k of the executive conduct of
the bank, the extent of their knowl
edge of the bank's paper, the latitude
conceded by them to bank officers in
overstepping the national banking
law provisions and their supervision
of the bank details. This Is said to
be the first complete official inquiry
into the relationship between banks
and the directors.
I-
C. T. U. IN SESSION.
Address of the President Feature of
the Convention.
Denver, Oct. 24.—The thirty-fifth an
nual convention of the National Wo
man's Christian Temperance unlbn
met in the Auditorium and will con
tinue Its sessions until next Wednes
day night.
The most important features were
the address of the president, Mrs.
Lillian M. N. Stevens, and the re
ports of the secretary and treasurer.
Mrs. Stevens awoke the enthusiasm
of her hearers when she recited the
great progress made by the temper
ance cause during the past year. The
election of officers will take place
next Tuesday and It is expected all
the present officers will be re-elected.
AMERICAN OFFICERS
G1VENAN OVATION
Lian Tokli to Join tin Fket
fl YOMHM.
Tokio, Oct. 24.—In preparation for
their departure from the hospitable
shores of-Japan the officers and men
of the American battleship fleet be
gan leaving for Yokohama, where th
final farewell will be said. Admirals
Sperry, Schroeder and Wainwright
took ollcial leave of Tokio at 3:rr
p. m. and their departure was made
the occasion of a great demonstration
Ambassador O'Brien, with the entire
staff of the American embassy the
British, German, French and Russian
ambassadors and other members of
the diplomatic corps gathered at the
station to wish the voyagers god
speed. In the throng that pressed
about the American officers were rep
resentatlves of every official depart
ment of the government and delegates
from every commercial body of the
city. In addition the streets and the
station contained an Immense con
course of people and thousands of
school children, who joined in an ova
tion no less enthusiastic than the one
accorded the party upon its arrival
VERY FRIENDLY TO HILL.
Kaiser Devotes Much Time to Amer
ican Ambassador.
Berlin, Oct. 24.—Emperor William
has attracted the attention of the dip
lninatic corps by his recent atten
tions to David Jayne Hill, the Amer
ican ambassador. It is probable that
the purpose of his majesty has been
to remove all doubts, if any existed,
regarding Mr. Hill,'s welcome at the
German court.
During the court festivities in con
nection with the wedding of Prince
August William and Princess Alexan
dra the emperor was particularly cor
dial to Dr. Hill and at the gala opera
performance recently the emperor
asked that Dr. IIlll come to him ana
then spoke with the ambassador for
some time. The same evening Prince
Henry sought out Dr. Hill and talked
with him about their experiences in
America together.
SHOT ON BRIDAL TOUR.
'4
-V
tel.
"i
Truth and
Quality
appeal to the Well-informed in every
walk of life and are essential to permanent
success and creditable standing. Accor
ingly, it is not claimed that Syrup of Figs
and Elixir of Senna is the only remedy of I
known value, but one of many reasons]
why it is the best of personal and family
laxatives is the fact that it cleanses,
sweetens and relieves the internal organs i
on which it acts without any debilitating
after effeots and without having to increase
the quantity from time to time.
It acts pleasantly and naturally and
truly as a laxative, and its component
parts are known to and approved by
physicians, as it is free from all objection-1
aide substances. To get Its beneficial]
effects always purchase the genuine
manufactured by the California Fig Syrup
Co., only, and for tale by all leading dru$
gists.
COMPTROLLER HAD
CRITICISED BANKl
Letters Read at Trial at Horse
i and Curtis.
1
New Yorit, Oct.
n—At
Thorne, which was discounted by Mr.
Morse. The comptroller said he did!
not think these loans were in keeping
with good banking and he said also
that the bank was loaning too freely
on collateral of companies in which
Mr. Morse was interested. To this Mr.
Curtis replied, according to a letter]
read by Mr. Stimson, that the bank
felt its security was ample and that
Mr. Morse was financially able to pro
tect any loans he was behind and
called attention to the fact that Mr.
Morse was then neither a director nor
an officer of the steamship company
referred to.
The exchange of letters between
the comptroller and the officers of the
bank continued up to the time of ehe
panic last October. In the last four
letters which he wrote the comptrol
ler, in rather curt language, demand
ed the immediate payment of some of
the paper in the bank, a reduction of
the amount of securities in the Morse
enterprises which was held as collat
eral and strengthening of the collat
eral behind certain other loans.
THORNE IN POLICE COURT
by
Husband of a Few Hours tlain
Wife's Former Suitor.
Plaquemine, La., Oct. 24.—Shot by
his bride's former suitor while on a
railroad train just starting on the
bridal tour F. A. Vaningan of Alexan
dria, La., died in his wife's arms as
the Texas and Pacific "Cannon Ball
express" came toward here. F. S.
Beauvre, the former suitor, who is
under arrest here charged with the
shooting, sat dlreetly across the aisle
from the bridal couple when the shot
was fired. It is reported that he had
but a few minutes before congratu
lated the couple and that he became
desperate when he saw Mrs. Vanin
gan place her arms across the back of
the seat against wfcJeli her buabaa*
was leaning.
'f-y-.:' -v
$ i K A
v
:^4r
Member of Parliament Gives Bond
for Good Behavior.
London, Oct. 24.—The case of Will
lam James Thorne, Socialist-Demo
cratic member of the house of com
mons, against whom a writ was issued
last week charging that he had in
cited to a breach of the peace by
making a speech in which he advised
the unemployed to "rush" the baker
shops rather than starve, camc up in
the Bow street police court. Thorne
was ordered by the magistrate to find
sureties for his good behavior for a
year or go to jail for six months
Peter F. Curran and James O'Grady,
fellow members of the house of com
mons, furnished the required bonds
for Mr. Thorn®
ractory uuiput Increasing
New York, Oct. 24.—Dispatches to
Dun's Trade Review indicate a re
markably well sustained volume of
business, considering the fact that
election 1s so near. It is especially
noticeable that the disposition is to
increase manufacturing output, pro
ducers evl -ntly expecting that con
sumption will soon expand.
WMWj
iPOTH
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r'«
PHONE 225
COAL
fWr'iaysl
session of the United States district
court, Judge Hough presiding, in the
trial of C. W. Morse and A. H. Curtis
for alleged violation of the national
banking laws, United States District
Attorney Stimson read a large num-l
ber of letters passing between the]
comptroller of the currency and Pres
ident Curtis of the National Bank of I
North America, relative to the bank's
loans. The tenor of all the comptrol-|
ler's letters was that Mr. Curtis and
the bank were permitting the concern
to be used by its officers and directors]
in financing their outside enterprises.
He specifically called attention to
loan of $1H MJ00 to the Hudson Navi
gation company, another of $1(j3,000
to the Consolidated Steamship lines
and one of $192,000 to Oakleigh
CNA&t&JtfiNNEDY
Proldnt
,'
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FARM
f* ^, -4
V.V'
LOANS
vii
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PHONE 195
*£.i
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& 4
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REMEMBER!!!
We have exclusive sale of
CADWttt'S ELECTRIC CUT .COffH
At 35c per pound
ind "GOLD MEDAL" COfM
I At 25c per pound
The Best in Good Groceries
of All Kinds
PHONE 256
We handle only the
T-*r »f V MWHWV V1MJ
A best and deliver to
all parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
Successor to Jones & Metcalf.
14 V*-
0.
AT LOWEST
RATES
y & -1
K
Er KETCHAJ
•#.*! v.-.. s" k-
to any part ol thacitjN
e k a
It* I V J&r
HARD AND SOFT COAL
«V\
YAL BLATZ BREWING
MILWAUKEE BEER
oo draught at
KURTH'S,
J. S., MURPHY,
HEAGNEY & MUNSONS
i
Frioate stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
mat all Leading Saloons in the city.
J. AHMANN, Agent
MiiLrQ RuMiAi*
V
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COAL
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KENNEDY.
Vkc President
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THE
Madison State Bank
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