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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, October 26, 1908, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1908-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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£5
ROYAJL
BAKING POWDER.
Comes from Grapes
The only baking pow
der made from Royal
Grape Cream of Tartar
Imitation baking powders are made from
ENDS LIFE IN
GERMAN TRAIN
American Consul General at
Large Suicides.
APPOINTED FROM IOWA
Victim of Self Destruction Was Silas
C. McFarland, Formerly Editor of
the Marshalltown Times—Was Just
Returning to Berlin From a Visit to
Washington and tha CauMiff His
Act Is Unknown.
Berlin, Oct. 26.—Silas C. McFarland
of Iowa, consul general at large for
the European districts, shot himself
on a railroad train coming from Horn
burg to Berlin. He died almost imme
diately. His body was taken off the
train at Ludwigalust.
Mr. McFarland left the Continent
for Washington six weeks ago. He
was returning to Berlin to rejoin his
wife when he committed suicide.
The body is at present in the chapel
of the Rethlehem hospital at Ludwigs
lust. There seems to be no question
that he committed suicide.
Consul General Thackera has start
ed an investigation. He has sent Dep
uty Consul General von Versen to
Ludwlgslust to take charge of the
body.
Mr. McFarland was appointed con
sul general at large June 10. 1908. His
territory was Europe, excepting Euro
pean Russia, the Balkan states and
Greece. Prior to this appointment Mr.
McFarland was consul at Nottingham
and at Reichenberg and was made
consul general at St. Gall, Switzerland,
In 1907.
Mr. McFarland was born at Mount
Pleasant, la., June 3, 1859, educated
at Cornell college, Mount Vernon,
Ja., and Wesleyan university. He
was married in 1886 at ties Moines
to Marie Eiboeck. Before entering
the consular service hp was editor and
pyblisher of the Marshalltowu (Iowa)
Times.
MOROS ATTACK LABORERS
Five of Latter and Their Superin
tendent Killed.
Manila. Oct. 26.—Five Filipino la
borers and their superintendent were
killed in a fight with a band of Moros
on the Shepherd sugar plantation
near Illgan. Island of Mindanao.
The attack of the Moros was whol
ly unexpected and the laborers lost
heavily before they finally rallied and
drove off the attacking party.
The buildings of the plantation
were fired by the Moros as the? re
treated slowly.
Taft Ends Indiana Tour.
Hsry, Ind., Oct. 2f.—William
Taft ended his Indiana tour here.
Judge Taft continued his short talks
to farmers wherever stops were made.
There were fifteen towns on his itiner
ary, Including Richmond. Portland,
Decatur. Fort Wavne, Goshen, Elk
hart, South Bend, haporte and Gary.
TM crowds which met the candidate
WSSS large MM! enthustastle.
Absolutely
Pure
harsh
mineral acid* and leave in the food
unhealthful properties
WON BY AN AMERICAN.
Fourth Vanderbilt Automobile Cup
Race Results.
Motor Parkway, L. I., Oct. 26.—
George Rot ertson. in a 120-horsepow
pr locomobile, an American made ma
chine, won the fourth Vanderbilt au
tomobile cup race on the new motor
parkway on Long Island, and at the
same time created a new American
record for long distance automobible
contests. Herbert I.ytle, driving an
Italian Isot'o o! fifty horsepower,
was second, less than two minutes
behind the winner. These cars were
the only ones to officially finish the
race, the great crowd of not less than
a quarter of a million persons, who
had filled the grand stand and almost
everv point of vantage around the en
tire course, crowding on the track
after the two flr3t cars had dashed
across the finish line. To avoid the
possibility of serious accident it be
came necessary for the track officials
to declare the race off after the sec
ond car had finished.
The winner's average speed was
64.3 miles per hour. The best pre
vious American record was 64.2 miles
per hour, made by Lytle on the same
course two weeks ago.
THREE MONTHS IN JAIL
Suffragette Leaders Refuse ta Oive a
Peace Bond.
London, Oct. 2*5.—Mrs. and Misa
Pankhurst and Mrs. Drummond, the
suffragette leaders who were arrested
recently charged with inciting to dis
order in appealing to the public to
help them "rush" the house of com
mons, were ordered in the Bow streej
police court to find sureties for their
good behavior for one year. In default
of this Mrs. Pankhurst and Mrs
Drummond were sentenced to imprls
onment for three months and Misa
Pankhurst for ten weeks. The worn
en announced their intention of going
to prison. The magistrate refused to
hear the evidence of fifty witnesses
summoned by the suffragettes. Miss
Pankhurst delivered an impassioned
addjjesSt for the defense.
Murder Over a
Gower, Mo., Oct. 26.—E. .T. Martin,
aged forty-five, proprietor of a saloon
here, was shot and killed in the Gower
depot by Wood Arnold, aged twenty
rive. Arnold had been driiIcing in
Martin's saloon and wore Martin's hat
away. When the saloon man asked
for the ha(. Arnold shot him through
the heart. Arnold escaped on a train.
Storm Causes Heavy Loss of Life.
BluefieUls, Nicaragua. Oct. 26.—A
disastrous hurricane swept the coast
of Nicaragua, destroying the towns of
liic Grande and Prinzapulka and do
ing considerable damage in the inte
rior. The* entire coast from Pearl
Cays to Cape Gracias was swept and
•iere was much loss of life.
H$as
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i
Explosion" In Palace.
TJst)on, Oct. 26.—What Is desCrfSect
here as a "&as explosion" occurred at
the royal palace at Oporto. General
Cibrao and three other persons suf
fered injuries. ThQ palace is being
prepared for the coming of King Man
uel on Nov. C. ',
Train Huns into Open
Detroit, Oct. 26.—Carl Volkentrffc, a
trolley boy. was killed and a dozeu
workmen were Injured, five seriously,
when a Detroit United railway con
struction train ran into an open
•Si „L'f.•
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OF GREAT LOSS
TO THE NATION!
Ibis Year's Forest Fires the
Worst on Record.
HOST IMPORTANT PROBLEM
Gifford Pinchot, Chief of the Forestry
Bureau, Declares the Prevention of
Such Destructive Blazes Is of the
I
i
Greatest Necessity in Connection
With the Plan of Canaarviitff Our
Natural Resources.
Washington, Oct 26.—"In many
ways this year's forest fires have been
the worst I have ever known," sai I
Gilford Pinchot, chief of the forestry
bureau. "The whole northern half
the country has been attacked and the
lorses represent a serious drain on
our timber supply.
"Besides destroying valuable tim
ber and other property the fires which
have been raging during the last few
weeks in the East have caused an al
most incalculable loss to watersheds
of important streams supplying power
to countless industries. In the Adi
rondack s the destruction has resulted
In the marring of the nation's most
useful playgrounds.
"There is little or no difference be
tween the fires of 1908 and those of
other years, so far as causes are con
cerned. Unfortunately there is little
difference in the way people have met
them. In most states the fires have
been allowed to run until they have
threatened valuable property and only
then efTorts were made to check them.
"The forest fire question resolves it
pelf into one of the most important
problems before the nation in the care
of its natural resources.
Success or Failure in Its Solution
by those having private holdings of
timber lands, means the continued
use of the land or the perpetual bur
den of caring for barren wastes. The
instruction following a fire is not re
alised by some and I sometimes think
that the greatest thing that could be
dene in furthering the movement for
the conservation of forest resources
would be to give as many people as
possible a chance to visit a section of
the country that has been impover
ished by a forest fire.
"The fire warden system has been
fairly successful in places, but its fun
damental weakness is that it is not a
preventive system. To begin work
after a fire has gained headway means
that from the start the chances are
against checking it before it has done
serious damage. No fire fighting sys
tem has shown itself really valuable
that did not privlde for range patrol.
In the national forest we ere meeting
the proposition with a satisfactory
system, although the number of men
fn the field is insufficient and I he
rangers' districts are so large that the
fire risk 1b raised above the point of
Bafety. The ona secret of fighting
fires is to discover your fire as soon
as possible, fight it as hard as you
ran and refuse to le«T® it until the
last ember Is dead."
TO TAKE EFFECT DEC. 1.
Western Roads Adopt Uniform Bill of
Lading.
Chicago, Oct. 26.—By Dec. 1 or soon
thereafter the new uniform bill of lad
ing recommended by the Interstate
commerce commission, which was
formulated by a joint committee of
thlppers and railroad representatives,
sill be in effect on practically every
railroad in the United States. All
freight shipments then must be made
Iccording to its contract provisions,
specifying exactly the liability of the
carrier for loss or damage and the
rates under which the freight is trans
ported.^
This uniformity was made possible
by the decision of representatives oi
the Western lines at a meeting in the
Railway Exchange building, when the
decision was reached to put the bill
into effect by Dec. 1 under practically
the same conditions as those adopted
by the Eastern lines, which will begin
using it on Nov. 1.
DIESliTYHE FLAMES.
Feeble Minded Man Refuses to Leave
Burning Home.
Hillsboro, N. D., Oct. 26.—The farm
house of Arne Evanson and his sistei
in Norway township burned during
the night and the former lost his life
He was feeble minded and about six
ty-six years of age.
Evanson called to his sister that he
smelled smoke and when she invest!
gated she found the kitchen on fire
She hastened to her brother's room to
get him out, but he became confused
or frightened and refused to leave the
house. Frantic with fear she hurried
to a neighbor's residence for help, but
when they returned Evanson was
dead.
Tha victim had lived to Traill coua
vr*
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y
v
&
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR 1
GOVERNOR OF MICHIGAN
FRED M. WARNER.
CAUSED GREAT EXCITEMENT
Rumors That Night Riders Had Slair.
Governor Patterson.
Memphis, Tenn., Oct. 26.—Rumors
that Governor Malcolm Ii. Patterson
had been assassinated by night riders
caused great excitement on the street:*
of Memphis, which was not abated
until inquirers were assured bj the
Associated Press that it was not true.
The story that the governor had
been killed came first from Covington,
Tenn. Later it reached the city over
broker wires and in a few minutes
was carried into the streets.
From that time it spread like wrild
fire until denials from authoritative
sources put an end to fears at vio
lence to the governor.
$60,000 SHORTAGE
IN THE CITY'S CASH
Experts Me a Discovery
For nearly two years it has been
known that there was a shortage in
the treasury office of $37,000. Officials
of that office all disclaimed responsi
bility and an effort was made to con
nect the missing money with Ed
Smith, a former tax collector, who is
serving time in the penitentiary for
forgery. It was not until State Con
troller Nye instituted an action to re
cover $14,000 of the state's money in
cluded in the missing funds that any
legal steps were taken to clear up
the mystery.
Expert, accountants were employed
and In their report they have uncov
ered a total shortage of $fi0,000 and
declared that the money was taken
during the term of Former City Treas
urer Charles A. Bantel. An A*r»ert in
hand writing declared that the books
had been altered and Tomally was
summoned and subjected to an exam
ination that lasted five hours. Up to
the last, it la said, he declared Us ln
rocence. He is now in custody.
CLOSE WATCH ON ABRUZZI
Italian Reporters Watching His Every
Movement.
Turin, Oct. 26.—Representatives ot
the press are keeping close watch of
the movements of the Duke of the
Abruzzi- They are practically besieg
ing the Cisterna palace, where he re
sides, in the fear that he may get
away without their knowing it.
The duke left the palace in a motor
car. Immediately the rumor spread
that he was going to board a train at
a small station near Turin and that
he had actually begun his secret jour
ney to the Uuited States. As a mat
ter of fact the duke went to visit a
personal friend, a member of the sen
ate, with whom he remained for sev
eral hours.
An excellent authority characterized
as premature and possibly incorrect
the reporis that the marriage of the
duke and Miss Katherina Elkina waa
imminent.
Russian Troops in Persia.
Constantinople, Oct. 26.—According
ta official advices received here Rus
eit n troops have crossed the Aras riv
at- into the Persian pro vine* ot Aser-
K
$1000.00
.sf
is**
V
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-A
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of
7'V-V
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"T-•r
Given for any mtxtsaee in*
juiiout to health found in food
resulting from the IUC of
4
Catonet
Powder
UNDER COVER OF
VISIT Of fLEET
Plot to Assassinate High Chi
nese Officials.
Afiaoy, China, Oct. 26.—The prepar
ationn for the reception here on Oct.
30 of the Second division of the Amer
lean battleship fleet are nearing com
pletion. The work of reconstructing
the ground* and pavilions where the
visitors will be entertained—they
were seriously damaged by the recetu
typhoon—-is practically finished. The
Chinese officials who are to take part
in the welcome are arriving every day
at
Saa Francisco. '.
San Francisco, Oct. 26.—In the en
deavor to fix the responsibility for a
shortage of $37,500 in the city treas
ury a committee of investigation has
rnaae the unexpected discovery that
funds to the extent of $30,000 more
are missing and criminal prosecution
is foreshadowed in the detention by
the authorities of .lunies ('. Tomally,
for several years a bookkeeper in the
office.
A plot hftn been unearthed here the
object of which was the assassination
of certain high Chinese officials dur
ing the reception by the government
to the American fleet. It originated
with the Chinese revolutionists of Sin
gapore.
As a result extraordinary. precau
tions are being taken for the safety
of all officials. A strong guard has
been thrown around the reception
ground and will be maintained all the
time the vessels are in port and no
strangers will be admitted to any of
the festivities er entertainments of
welcome.
THEIR PACE TOO RAPID.
Yale Professor Explaina Ills ef Soci
ety Women.
Chicago, Oct. 26.—Too many late
suppers, both wine aad wineleas, too
much powder and paint, big theater
parties and too little sleep are de
clared by Theodore A. Johnson, as
sistant professor of sociology of Yale
university, to he the causa of ill health
among Chicago society woven. He
spoke before the Woman's club in
Woodlawn.
He says Chicago society women ar
run down physically and mentally be
cause they have traveled too rapid a
pace in an attempt to keep up with
their neighbors, who are killing them
selves in the same manner.
He also said the smart set should
cultivate smartaess and not silliness
He intimated that at present Are
a detriment to the world.
Epidemic Among Children.
Chicago, Oct. 26.—Aa epidemic of
scarlet fever and diphtheria has been
discovered by the health department
among the children of the foreign
born residents of the part of the
stock yards district known as the
"Jungle." More than sixty cases were
reported. The greatest difficulty in
preventing a spread of the disease
was found in the efforts of the afflict
ed families to conceal the Maw to
prevent quarantine.
Airship Sails About City.
Friedrickshafen, Oct. 26.—The Zep
pelin airship made another successful
ascent here and maneuvered about
the city at the will of the pilots. The
craft is being tuned up for the ascen
sion to be made by Prince Henry of
Prussia, Emperor William's brother,
On Tuesday.
To clinch the policies of President
Roosevelt will be to the trained arm
of Judge Taft like driving the nail
home.
Truth and
Quality*'
appeal to the Well-Informed 1ft liuy
walk of life and are essential to permanent
success and creditable standing. Accor
ingly, it is not claimed that Syrup of Figs
and Elixir of Senna is the only remedy of
known value, but one of many reasons
why it is the best of personal and family
laxatives is the fact that it cleanses,
sweetens and relieves the internal organs
on which it acts without any debilitating
after cffects and without having ta increase
the quantity from time to time.
It acts pleasantly and naturally and
truly as a laxative, and its component
parts arc known to and approved by
physicians, a3 it is free from ^1 objection
able substances. To get its ben
effects always purchase the genuine
manufactured by the California Fig S-'yrup
Co.. only, and for sale by all leading drug
ftsta.
it
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PHONE 22*.
COAL
tf'
REMEMBER!"
We have exclusive sale of
CADWBi'S ELECTRIC CUT COfPEE
At 35c per pound
I
E.
"GOLD MEDAL" COfTfE
At 25c per pound
The Best in Good Groceries
of All Kinds
W.
PHONE 198
fs
2&V
V:
$
'V-'
"S.iX fr&y 'U
1 PRESTON'S
,»r
PHONE 256
We handle only the
best and deliver to Y'.V*
all parts of the city r*
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
Successor to Jones & Metcalf.
CHAS. B. KENNEDY KENNEDY,
Vkifktddcris.
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MADISON, S.
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FARM fjQAJ& AT LOWEST, POSSIBLE
RATES
the best grade of
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KETCHAfl
«n«8MTpttiavfrtouifiput
A
HARD 4m^S0FT-ip0AL^
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO.
MILWAUKEE BEER i
FRED KURTH'S, v
J.
on draught at /"*.»*{*
S. MURPHY,
PridaW stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
it all Leading Saloons in the city,'
L. J. AHMANN, A#eot.
Makes
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