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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 09, 1908, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1908-11-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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•ent
jui Sioux
vf- V
Wy-'-l it 1 "I
/toy,
JANE*
1AIA®.
of rvi
tft FP
1
In the lute election twentj'-Beveu
ates elected governors. Of this nam
Br the democrats elected twelve.
Politics will furnish the principal
%piCH of discussion at Ihe 08th annual
fonvention of the American Federation
Of Laltor which opened in Denver to
jflay. There will be vigorous opposi
tion from the start to any action pledg
ing the federation to any political po
j#cy and an etlort probably will 1«
jSiade to bind the organization to Keep
fnurely out of polities, both local and
Rational,in the future. The matter will
lie brought up in the form of a resolu
tion both approving and condemning
Ibe action of Tonipera and membeis of
|be executive lxard iu supposing the
ilemocratic ticket in the last campaign.
Falls Forum:
A
RESOLVED
THAT GAF^ENTS.SHOULD
/1U WOOL
If
IWlfA*
•Some .skirt.s, waut^ and cloaks ar.e
CERTAINLY A YARD WIDE IT NOT ALL WOOL.
Of COUR.SE OUR GARMENTS ARE ALL WOOL
BUT WE ARE THANKFUL THAT THEY ARE NOT
ALL A YARD WIDE, AND .So .SHOULD YOU BE.
BECAUSE YOU ARE NOT A YARD WIDE. WHY
NOT GET CLoTHE-S THAT FIT. WE FIT PEOPLE
IN
OUR .STORE. THE ONLY TIME WHEN MANY
PEOPLE WHO BUY CLOTHED "HAVE A FIT" 1,5
AFTER THEY BUY THEM. YOU WILL NOT HAVE
A FIT AFTER YOU BUY GARMENTS FROM
BUT WHEN YOU BUY THEM.
J. A. JOHNSON.
A. J. PETERS,
..SHOE REPAIRING..
Basement Jack's Restaurant.
Having recently located in Madison I cor
dially solicit your orders. FIRST CLASS WORK GUARANTEED
©Ijc ©mill CXi 1 the men at the head am] mark*
A OIHOH. BOOTH DAKOTA.. them all for new honors.
TELEPHONE, NO. 26fc
MONDAY. NOV. !, 1908
i»»«» o» luwumrtiuii.
»7 mail, I jwar |4.OQ
^7 stall, n mouths..*..... 8.00
VBlll, 8 month* l.oo
Ifr mall, 1 month—.86
tp ctrrlar par mk if
J. f. MAII y t^lor
II. A. HTA ML, Bnfiintn1 Mkuak^T.
The
indications are that
the
divorce
||w faaa carried in thin state by a uw
J|rity of about :,()()(). Eastern di
vorce hunters will now be required to
fBside iu the state a yeir before com
Xpeccing divorce proceedings. instead
six months. Trials must now Ui
fcad in open court instead of Iwbiml
ftfoeed doors. The South Dakota di
vorce mill has teen renovated,and "di
force while you wait' is
a
The
thing of (far
newspapers and defeated cnnfl
4atpf
are
telling why the election went
Ibis way and that way and the other
•ay. It
is enongo to know
right.
that
it
number of
$ioux Falls stalwarts cut the ticket
Tuesday on the ground that the insur
rntu
cut them two years ago. This
a sad state of affairs and justifies the
Expressions used in the state press
toward Minnehaha, which is called the
'"crazy-belt,"' a "coarse boil," and
Hgther fitting expressions. If the dis
affected republicans had accomplished
their purpose, Minnehaha would have
Itood alone, in tho state, sans sena
tor, sans influence, sans republican
l»tn. _______
Sioux
five
City Tribune: The Tribune
Extends congratulations to the ptogres-
republican leaders of South Da
kota. Their judgment, their discon
^eminent of the opportune time, their
Courage and theii skill lifted the
State into safety this important year
JMd anchored ifc in the republican col
ton,lot yeasa to mm %jfm tmrait
BE
WHO SELL
PEOPLE,
THEMIS YOU SAY THEY ARE.
the- latib
my
BE'FLFECCD'
IN ORDER "TO MAKE WOOLE
KIS,
PHILO HALL
He Will Hereafter Devote His
Energies to His Law
Ptractio*
Brookings, Nov. 9.—Congressman
Philo Hall, of Brookings, spent Friday
here, his first visit in several months.
Mr. Hall is slowly recovering from a
severs accident, which occurred several
weeks ago, resulting iu the breaking of
his left leg in two places. Mr. Hall
has I een a great sufferer.but his recov
ery will be complete and especially
gratifying to his friends throughout
the state, who feared that he would be
permanently lame. Mr. Hall,although
unable to take active part in the late
political campaign, is especially grati
fied with the result,
in
both state and
nation.
Mr. Hall will go to Washington as
soon as he is able to
lay
crutches, to be there
New
aside bis
a
few days piior
to the opening of congress, in order
to line
up
some important matters
which he started iu the interest of
his state and which he hopes to have
passed before his term expires. Im
mediately thereafter he will turn hix
whole attention to his
law
and the seeutiug
business
of
a competence.
His strut attention to public duties
has necessitated his refusing much pro
fitable law business and has Iteeu a
distinct loss to him in
a
financial
way, and he b&s readied an age now
where he feels that he should
be
mitted to give his time
to
hia professional business.
per­
and attention
MAY DELAY THE CANAL
Subterranean Lake Found Under 8lte
of Proposed Lock.
Orleans, Nov. 9.—A
report
has
reached hero from Colon, Panama,
that a subterranean lake found under
the
site
of
one
of
in completing
larger outlay
New
the proposed big
locks of the Panama canal at Gatun
will result in a delay
of
several years
the
canal and a much
of money
than
at
york,
first
anticipated.
According to this report the discov
ery of the lakf* has been kept a secret.
Engineers who are said to know of
the discovery declined ^o discuss the
matter during the absence of Colonel
Goethals, who is in the United States.
Nov.
at
9.—Colonel
thals, chairman
Gatun
was
i v v
*. *,' i/
Goe-
of the
isthmian
canal
commission, declared that the report
pf the discovejy of a subterranean
iake under the site of the canal locks
"absolute rot."
iMriMMtion aw* Atamach ..ew4»
w
•,
THE CLEAN UP
Discussion of the Late Election
From Andy Lee's Home
Town
Vermillion,
N
GOODS BUT YOU MEED NOT
BE FLEECED IF 'Yocl BUY AT
A RELIABLE STORE
BUSTER BROVrt.
Nov. 8.
The campaign
is over in Foutii Dakota, and the demo
rats are whipped good and plenty
The republicans have not only elected
the presidential electors, but have also
made a clean sweeu of the state ticket
The defeat of Lee for governor is a dis
ippointment to a great many, both
democrats and republicans, but his de
teat does not rest heavily on Mi. Lee.
He did not want to make the run for
governor and only accepted the nomi
nation at the mgent request cf his
closest fiiends. It was lelieved that
lie could poll a far larger vote than
any other man that could be named.
And he did. But at that he is defeat
ed by nearly 17,0(10 votes. Had the
democrats abandoned everything and
made the fight for Lee alone, they
might have snccfeded in electing him
governor. But this was not the case
They devoted their efforts towards
electing the entire ticket and lost
everything.
There is one thing very commend
able about the campaign which Mr
Lee conducted. He showed no mer
cenary streak, and instead of rushing
liis own candidacy to the limit, he
went in for the democratic cause from
top to bottom. Mr. Lee time and
again expressed the desire to have the
legislature with him, or else he would
just as soon not lie elected. He want
ed the state to go for Bryan, and said
HO iu every speech that he made. He
could have received the support of re
publican newspapers for a considera
tion for himself, but did not feel that
it was an honest proposition, since the
same papers would be opposed to Bry
an, and the iest of the state ticket.
He might have won, but the victory
would not have had any pleasures for
him had he oeen compelled to stand
alone.
The defeat of Mr. Lee is a sur
prise all along the line. Few there
were who would predict otherwise
than that he would win. But in the
lust two weeks of the campaign the
republican management abandoned
everything else and went in to save
Vessey. The only regretable feature
is that mud slinging was resorted to.
and that Mr. Lee's character was as
sailed, both at home and abroad. The
impression was scattered broadcast that
lie was not only an immoral man, but
also that ne was in league with the
saloon forces as against the prohibi
tionists. All such arguments were
used against him, and they had the
desired effect.
Chairman Dick Lyons has little to
say regarding the defeat cf the demo
ratic ticket. He fetls that the state
management did everything |in its
power to win, and attributes defeat to
the fact iliat the normal republican
majority was too big to overcome.
The campaigo tund was none too large
at any time, and much that might
have been done could not be considered
becatuo of lack of money
THE LAWS
Anti-Salooon League OftHW
That County Option
Carried
Sioa* Falls, Nov. 8.—Her. Gratfon,
president of the State AntI Saloon
league composed of the "vote yes"peo
ple in the county option tight, now
comes forward with a claim of a ma
joiity for their side of 2,000 votes
in South Dakota. The saloon people
claim the state by fS.000.
Two of the proposed state laws*
county option and Sunday closing
were turned down, accoiding to all in
dications from the election. The quail
protection law cariied probaoly. It is
impossible to get complete figures on
the votes for or against the lavvH until
after the canvassing boards for the
various counties meet.
Much comment is heard about the
form of the ballots, which was such
that manv believed they were voting
"no" on the county option law, when
they leally voted "no"' on the divorce
law. The saloon men, who opposed
the passage of the county option law,
while confident of victory, state that
they would have carried the county op
tion fight by a big majority had they
had the "Yes" and "No" printed at
the head of the county option column.
Complete returns from the precincts
of two cwunties—Yankton and Davison
give majoiities of 400 and i00, re
•pectively, for the passage of the di
vorce law requiring a six months
residence. Minnehaha county ga\e
its vote against the law, according to
incomplete returns from the various
precincts. So far, returns would in
dicate that the divorce law had car
ried, and that hereafter imported di
vorcees will have to remain a full year
instead of six months, and will have
to air tueir family tioubles in open
court, instead of confining them to the
judges' chambers.
The law prohibiting Sunday base
ball and theaters where admission is
charged unquestionably lost, as far as
reported, Accoiding to the available
information gathered from the incom
plete returns, the vote was t*\o ont'
nuainst it.
While these results are given for
their face value, the canvassing boards
may change the appearance gieatly
The canvassing board in all the coun
ties meet on or before next Tuesday,
Nov. 10. Figures probably will be
obtainable Thursday for Minnehaha
county and the returns from the state
will probably be sufficient then to an
nounce safe majoiities one way or the
other.
14
i i & a i
Simple Operation In the Retire
mint of a President.
SAD BUT MEMORABLE EVENT.
Veteran Disbursing Officer of Execu­
tive Mansion Describes His Emotions
When Saying Qoodby to Different
Presidents.
On the 4th of next March the presi
dent of the United States will leave
the White House and drive to the
capltol with William Howard Tat't,
who Is to become his successor, and
the president of the United States will
go to the White House to take up the
reins of government. For Mr. Taft It
will be the proudest day in the hiBtiry
of his life. For Theodore Roosevelt It
will be a memorable anniversary,
tinged with the sadness which, sin^e
the beginning of tl* nation, has been
felt by every ex-president of the United
States.
The retirement of a president from
the White House Is a pathetic mile
stone in the lives not only of the pres
ldent and his family, but in the lives
of the household staff of the mansion,
says the Boston Herald. Many of
these officials, caretakers and serv
ants have served for years. The aver
age term of a president nowadays is
eight years, and in this time friend
ships are formed between the family
of the executive and the people gath
ered about them to serve them. Presi
dent Roosevelt's young children have
practically spent their childhood in the
White House. The leave taking will
be naturally sorrowful for them, as
well as for the doorkeepers, messengers
and attendants who have been their
companions for seven years.
The actual moving of one family out
of and another family into the White
House is a simple operation, attracting
in itself but little attention on the part
of the families concerned and none at
all on the part of the general public.
Preparations are being made In ad
vance, personal effects quietly packed
and possessions sent to the future
home. The leave taking on the part of
the retiring president, his wife and
children consists only of the goodbys
said and the handshakes given, for
the White House is entirely furnished
by the government.
In the winter the president will be
gin preparations for leaving, the de
tails of which will be under the per
sonal direction of Secretary Loeb and
Colonel Bromwell, superintendent of
public buildings and grounds. In the
first place, all the papers which have
accumulated in the White House dur
ing the last seven years will be care
fully looked into by the president and
his office staff. All personal papers
will be packed and sent to Oyster Bay.
All official papers and documents will
be sent to the various executive de
partments of the government, accord
ing to the usual custom. Then the per
sonal effects of the Roosevelts will be
packed and early in the year will be
sent to the Sagamore Hill home under
Mr. Loeb's directions.
Of those who have long been associ
ated with the White House none will
witness the departure of the Roosevelt
family with greater regret than Colonel
W. II. Crook, the veteran disbursing
officer of the White House, who enter
ed the executive mansion service in
the first term of President Lincoln and
has been there ever since. He has
seen every president say farewell to
the White House since the war.
"The departure of a president is one
of the saddest things I know," said
Colonel Crook. "I am scarcely able to
describe the emotions I have felt la
saying goodby to the different presi
dents under whom I have served and
the members of their families. I be
"eve I never felt quite so badly as
when President Cleveland retired at
the close of his first term, and perhaps
they felt it keenly too. Mrs. Cleveland
remained until the last moment on the
morning on March 4, loath to take her
departure. She visited the different
rooms, looking at the pictures, gaxing
out of the windows. I went to her to
say goodby and found her taking leave
of old Jerry Smith, one of the old
time colored servants of the White
House.
'Jerry,* said Mrs. Cleveland, "keep
everything in good order until I come
back.'
"Mrs. Cleveland evidently believed
that her husband would later be re
elected president, and her faith was
vindicated, for he was, and Mrs. Cleve
land did come back, and Jerry Smith
had everything as she liked it. She
gave me a bunch of violets when she
said goodby to me. I have that faded
bouquet still and would not part with
it.
"When Mrs. Grant retired from the
White House she went around the
building and shook hands with every
one and said goodby. Mrs. Lincoln's
departure was the saddest I ever wit
nessed. President Lincoln was assas
sinated on April 14. 1865. and died the
next morning. The blow fell with the
force of a bolt from a clear sky. Presi
dent Johnson took up his headquarters
in the treasury building for ten days,
in which time Mrs. Lincoln made her
sorrowful preparations to leave.
"The goiug away of Mrs. Garfield
was sad, too, but General Garfield lin
gered for a long time before his death,
and the blow to his wife was not so
sudden as that to Mrs. Lincoln. Mrs.
McKinlcy returned to the White House
after the assassination, but she never
returned after she had accompanied
her husband's remains to Canton."
Most of the presidents have left
Washington immediately after the ln
tttgurattoa of tbeir mceuuom,
Suite 4-5
Smith-Garner Blk.
Electric Light#.
An ordinance fixing the rates to be
charged for electric lights in the city
of Madison.
Be it ordained by the city council of
the city of Madison, South Dakota
Section 1. The basis of all rates
for electric currents in the city of Mad
ison shall be ten cents per thousand
(1000) watts for any amount under
ten thousand watts ($1.00) a rate of ten
cents per thousand watts shall be
charged. For any amount over ten
thousand watts up to and including
fifty thousand watts (#5.00) there shall
le a discount allowed of five per cent.
For any amount over fifty thousand
watts, up t,o and including one huu.
lred and fifty thousand watts (#15.00)
there shall be a discount allowed of ten
per cent. For any amount over one
hundred and fifty thousand watts there
shall DO allowed a discount of fifteen
per cent. Motors and all electric ap
paratus of every description up to one
half I) horse power at the above men
tioned rates.
Motors and ail electric apparatus
over one half (J) horse power, rate to
te fixed by the council. All bills
must l»e pai 1 on or before the tenth of
the month following the contracting
of tho same, or no discount will be
allowed.
Section 2. All ordinances and
parts of ordinances iu conflict
with are hereby repealed.
—Geo. H. \Va8kay,
Mayor,
Approved Jg«*. 5th, 1MB.
Attest,
—Wm. Rae,
City
Auditor.
Will Interest Many
Every person should know that food
health is impossible if the kidnevs are
deranged. Foley's Kidney Remedy will
cure kidney and bladder disease in every
form, and will build up and strengthen
these o.gans so they will perform their
functions properly. No danger of
ISright's disease or diabetes if FoleyV
Kidney Remedy is taken in time.—J. H.
Anderson
Hows s This?
W* «ffer O
ne Hundred
Dollars He
waTd for any cai5e of Catarrh that car
not be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure.
F. J. Cheney & Co., Toledo, O
We, the undersigued, have known
I. Cheney for the last If) sears, and b«
lieve him perfectly honorable in a'
business transactions, and financially
able to carry out any obligations mad
by his firm. Walding Kinnan A Marvu
Wholesale Druggists, Toledo, i
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken intei
nally, acting directly upon the blood
and mucas surfaces of the svstem. Tes
timonials sent free. Price 75^ per
bottle. Sold by all druggists.
Take Hall's It'aiuily L'tlls for Consti
ation
Passed Examination Successfully
James Donahue, New Britain, -nn
writes: "1 tried several kidney remedies,
and was treated by our best physician,
for diabetes, but did not improve until
I took Foley's Kidney Remedy. After
the second bottle I showed improvement,
and five bottles cujed me completely. 1
have since passed a rigid exam.nation
for life insurance. Foley's Kidney
Kemedy cures backache and all forms of
kidney and bladder trouble. —J H. A nd
s v n A
A.tjfi.l'*. V.
..id Right
Its
Not
Ruined
ie gown which has the ugly
spot can be made like new, just
send it to us and learn a new
lesson In economy.
Many articles in every home
are annually cast aside,--they
might give further service xt
cleaned or dyed.
We make things look almost like
new at trifling- expense to you.
Information booklet free. Wf pay rrtrue
order* of M.N «r marc.
,'llll i—P—
Off with the Old and on with the New
There is always an end and a beginning for everything, in fact
life is made up largely of beginnings and endings.
Seven years ago we made Madison our home and one roof has
covered my business dealings since that time, I am still under the
same roof, but am up one flight and in business for myself.
That old patrons will be welcome goes without saying, of course.
All work will be guaranteed as before, and every case shall have
my careful quiet attention in rooms fitted up especially for this
work and away from the noise and turmoil of business.
If you have been to me before then you know the class of work
you get, if you have not been here then come and see.
ai.
fi I v
Rain Proof, Moth Proof,
Double Seat and Knee,
Taped Seams,
Wire Sewed Buttons,
Patent Elastic Waist Band,
&
AUGUST WILLIGES,
Manufacturer of—
Fine Furs
609 4th Street,
SIOUX CITY, IOWA.
Orders for Special Work
or Repairing Solicited.
1
ASBURY F. LAITY, Optician.
GRINAGER BROS.,"!
The Clothiers
i
"Your Best-Ever" Boys
and our "Best-Ever" Suits will
go well together. Just as you
are careful in the rearing of
your boys, so we exercise care
in selecting the boy's clothes
we sell. For good neat appear
ing, strongly made clothes are
necessary to the proper mold
ing of your boy's character.
Guarantee Label in Every Coat.
Ask to see the "Best-Ever" Suit
You are sure to like it.
Hats of Quality
SUIT
JTITZhfCHOENBERQ
Every "Best-Ever" Suit has all of these exclusive health pro
tecting and wear resisting features:
Hand Padded Shoulders,
"Indestructible" Coat tini|&
Double Stayed Pockets,
Silk Sewn Seams,
Facing Around Coat Bottom,
If your new Fall Hat
is not already pur
chased, don't fail to
pay our store a visit
if you are desirous
of seeing
Exdusive Styles
only the best
Materials and Shapes
Prices [quoted are
extremely, low con
sidering quality.
MISS M. BOGEN
MISS GRINAGER,
Fashionable Milliner
My New Fall Stock
hat arrived and* is
ready for inspection
by the ladies of thi*
community. You |affm
cordially invited It
call!

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