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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 14, 1908, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1908-11-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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Z^LL WOOL
L-vep
THAT C?AKnENT5 SHOULD
L/lflB MAY BE'FLfLCfD
ORDER TO MAKE WOOL
EN
[GOODS BUT^J AIEED MOT
FLEECLD IF ^OU BUY AT
RELIABLE. STORE
BUSIER BROVrt,
.SOME .SKIRTS, WAISTS AND CLOAKS AR.E
CERTAINLY A YARD WIDE IF NOT ALL WOOL,
OR COUR.5E OUR GARMENTS ARE ALL WOOL
6UT
WE ARE THANKFUL THAT THEY ARE NOT
ALL A YARD WIDE, AND
.So
NOT
AFTER YOU BUY GARMENTS FROM
WHEN YOU BUY THEM.
A. J. PETERS,
..SHOE REPAIRING..
Basement Jack's Restaurant.
il Having recently located in Madismf T'tor
dially solicit your orders. FIRST CLASS WORK GUARANTEED
®l)e ©athi £zabvt
KAOI0OH, SOUTH DAKOTA.
1 TELEPHON K, ^0. 269
SATURDAY. NOV. 14. 1908
TISKI Of IliMVBIPtlOII.
H)Naatl,l y«*r M.Q0
By MIL iMmtk*
.Too
Bymll, tmitki,... I.OO
nr mm,i .M
»jr canter pw *~k.. ............ 10
rwoi,
John E. WhitiDg of Woonsockot if
being urged by his friends as th«
•priiker of the South Dnicota house of
MprcMntatifes at the Hpproaching sem
•Ion of the lagiftlatare.
NotwithstandiuR Yankton haa been
a dhrorc* town of considerable prjjKir
tioiuk tile people of thnt county gave
14»e new divorce law a majority of 421.
Weshlngton dispatch: Taiiflt revi
nion it certain to be taken up and com
(letM Within two or three montbs af
t«r Taft becometi president, according
to a poll of republic an liaomberg of the
next congress which tbt New York
American has made. Oat of 221 re
publican members tbe following re
torae were received:
Fa«or)ng prompt revision of the
Urilf, 79 favoring decided reductions,
11 favoring abolition of all tariff on
aome raw materials, 12 fa voting in
cveaee in the tariff, 1 against any
chaagM from pieaent, 1.
Reprawntative Martin of Sotifeb Da
kota, aawwesed:
tarift should be revised at a
epedalaMs'.on. Tbe principle of pro
tectiag nutnafactured products to the
extent of the difference in cost of pro
doctloo should be o1)Her\ed, and liberal
protection to the American laborer
aboald he iuclnded."
fiefmentative Barker of South Da
kota, said:
"I favor a revision of tne taiifl in
accordance with the republican na
ttoaal platform of 1908."
Is1- Wfei"
.lllie repnblican cauipaigu tg Iowa
«wi»tr ^S,8ar).72. The state committee,
noder tbe management of Chairman
Oar ?. Franke. collected 120,028.97.
Of tbl»«tim |4,000 was contributed by
tho cepablican national committae un
dW date of August 151 -snd November
4j.
Two federal oflk»holders gave |400
four candidates gave |350 each,
t-lpf^ayejpWKl. Thrje state candi-
1
each and a dozen or
mote than
fioo.
The
were auiall »Dd iacluded
Ired contribatorH.
"Preventics, those
Cold Cure Tablets are
in tny parish." Pre
«cold or the grippe
And ^pievwatica
"nlcioe.
nl for
»zoti8ot
STATE SECRETARY
Annual Report Shows Falling
Off of $8,000 in,
Receipts
"V
i'ierre, Nov. 13.- The report of the
secretary of state is piinted and is be
ing distributed. It shows that tbe re
ceipts c-f that department for tbe fiscal
yt iir ending June iiO last were nearly
#8,000 less than for the previous year,
which was canned by tbe falling off
of receipts from incorporations dur
ing the financial depression in the
east. Tbe receipts of the department
for the biennial jwriod covered by tbe
report were #61, {?(i
There were incorporated daring the
period twenty-five social and commer
cial corporations, twenty fraternal cor
porations, 135 religious and educational
corportions, 1.949 domestic corporations
for various purposes, 126 state buDks.
with a capital of $1,IB?.900. Two
hundred and 6fty foreigu corporations
entered the state. Three hundred and
three resident agents for foreign cor
porations, and 6«l resident agents for
domestic corporations were appointed,
and 1,331 persons were 'appointed and
commissioned as notaries public. The
pardon of eight persons was recom
mended. Four commissioners of deeds
were appointed and commissioned.
CAUGHTLAWYERS
Shrewd Swindler Plays Smooth
Caxpe on Legal
Fraternity
,,s *,
Aberdeen, Nov. 18.—In the United
States court yesterday the first civil
suit was tried and proved a farce. It
was that of Alfred Day against the
Northwestern road. In this case, in
wbicb tbe road was defendant in a
damage enit involving $80,000 for per
sonal injnries. the plaintiff alleged
thai while he was a fireman for the
road, another train backed into an en
gine nmler which he was woriiiug and
that by tbis accident he lost part of bis
right foot and sustained other injuries.
This is supposed to have happened at
Sioux Junction this state.
it turns ont that Day borrowed $100
from his attorneys, Case & Schurtleff of
Wateitown, and has not been «$een
since, that there was no snch acci
dent and that Day, under other
names, has been practicing tbis sort of
trizk for a long time, having brought
Huit under similar circumstances in
Minnesota and Wisconsin. This morn
ing when the case was brought up in
court, Attorney Uar*oet for the North
western presented the facts, no evi
dence wap furnished against it. and
Judge Carland directed a verdict for
the defendant
'.f^vm
SHOULD YOU BE,
A YARD WIDE, WHY
NOT GET CLOTHED THAT TIT. WE FMT PEOPLE
IN
OUR .STORE. THE ONLY TIME WHEN MANY
PEOPLE WHO BUY CLOTHED "HAVE A TIT" IJ
AFTER THEY BUY THEM. YOU WILL NOT HAVE
A
*"'"s'
Bt
If PtOPLE\
WHO SELL
THF/^T^ V^U 5AVTHEV ARE.
V S
1
m*Mu
J. A. JOHNSON,
yggjj&Et
jj
-¥T
BENEY SHOT
Noted San Francisco Prosecut
ing Attorney Shot in
Court
Francis J- Heney, tbe famous San
Francisco pro'teeuting attorney, was
-hot and seriously wounded in court in
S hj Francisco yesterday morning. Mr.
Hmey will be remembered in South
Dakota for the interest he took in
ilie state miniary campaign in June.
According to associated press dis
iisitiibes, Heney was shot by Morris
a saloonkeeper. Haas had been
[j.t^sed as a juror in tbe Ruef case when
Hvuey denounced Haas as an ex-con
vi( t, producing a photograph of the
juror in prinou garb. Haas was re
moved from tbe jury. The attorneys
f( i the prosecution and defense bad
i'i'turned to the room from a short
oiifeience witn Judge Lawler in his
clr-iuibers. Heney had resumed his
n-totnary seat and "was converwii)^
with Chief Clerk McOabe of the dis
trict
attorney's office, when Haas
en i :te forward. He approhcbe Heney.
Mini,
placing tbe revolver against his
litMit cheek, filed. Instantly the
court room was a scene of greatest
t'\ itei/jent. Some bystanders seized
Haas, others hastened to the relief of
Ileiiev, who was caugnt ms be fell for
ward, the blood streaming from his
wound.
Medical aid was summoned and
Heney was afterward taken to the
Central emergency hospital, where it
was ascertained his wounds were not
neressarily fatal, the bullet having
pHssed under the brain and found
!"lament under the left ear.
After Heney bad been removed from
f)]K court room Judge Lawler called
i ourt to order and had Haas placed in
custody.
When arrested Haas said that he shot
il'nev because he had ruined him He
is a married man and has four chil
dren. In i statement made to Police
attain Duke ho said:
"Heney denounced me in public,
whicn ruined my lite and branded me
us an ex convict. It was an outrage.
I am the wronged man. I do not
tare what becomes of me now. I have
sacrificed myself not for my own honor,
but, for those wbD are situated like
mysplf. By Hod. I would not have
brought my font children into the
world to bear such a brand if I had
known the fact that 1 was Bn ex-con
vict would become known. Heney
ruined me That is why I shot him.
It is the opinion of physicians that
Heney will recover be iB
desperately wounded.
INDIATTalthough
BARS
Sitting Bull Not a Chief—
Custer
to
Blame for
Massacre
Sioax City, Nov. 13.—"Sitting Bull
never was chief of the Slonx Indians,
said Doaue Robinson, secretary of the
State Historical Society of South Da
kota, in a lecture last evening before
tbe Sioux City Academy of Science
and Letters.
"The pep"'""' conception that this
famous Indian was a chief anu a
warrior is a mistake," the speaker ad
ded. "Sitting Bull was never a chief,
much less an Indian warrior. He wan
a high priest and medicineman. The
very highest of the priests in the In
dian religious worship.
"Clever as a conjurer, a sleight, of
hand man, a wonderful orator and a
sbrewd statesman and diplomat. Sit
ting Bull had perhaps more influence
over the Indians than their greatest
chief. At all times be was clever
But at all times be jpposed the Chris
tian religion and hated the white man.
For Sitting Bull could aee^in the Chris
tian religion a thing wbicb would rol
bim of his power as medicine man.
The famous old Indian never relent
ed, although hia son has siace taken
up the religion.
"Many think that Sitting Bull actu
ally led tbe Indians in tho famous Cus
ter massacre. This is also untrue.
Sitting Bull, as chief priest and medi
cine man pitched his tent on a high
ridge just away from the ambasb into
which the troopers had leen drawn
and there he made medicine. His son,
One Bull, a lad of 15 years, was with
him and stood outside his father's
tent with a pair of field glasses and
told the high priest tne details of the
fight. One Bull later told me that
the entire massacre from the first un
til Custer's last man was slain did
not last over fifteen minutes,and that
in tnat time scarcely any resistance
was put up by the soldiers, who were
paralyzed by the number of Indians
and the trap into which tbey had beep
drawn.
"Remember all the time while you
read and study of tbe ludians and of
the frontier warfare that the Indian
cannot be judged by th* standard of
tbe white man. It was the white man
and not tho Indian who broke the
treaties which weie made oy the Unit
ed States with Spotted Tail and Red
Cluud. It was the greed for gold fol
lowing tne awful disaster of tbe year
1873 which caused the inrush of miners
where the Indians had been promised
no white man should go, and especially
no soldier. This rush to the Black
Hills brought on the inevitable tight
which was closed with the Custer
massacre, and after which the Indians
were scattered
"Yonr military histories do not tell
tbe same story that I get from the In
diana. Mv tale comes direct from the
Indians, who were bat youtbs when
they participated in that great fight.
One Indian in particular—1 cannot
now call hia name~^told me that aa a
18-year-old boy he shot down three
...
Soldiers with a revolver. And this In
dian is now high minded, moral.
-Christian gentleman, ppntor in tke
Congregational church.
STATE MEWS.
A Collection of News Items from
Various Parts of the
State.
Aberdeen—Chicago capitalists are
planning to establish a brewery in this
city with a 25,000 barrel capacity. A
malting and ice making plant also will
be operated in connection. The aew
concern, it is said, will be conducted
on the co operative plan.
Mitchell—Walter Wallace, a young
fellow wno worked in a local restau
rant, was bonnd over to the circuit
court on the cbaige of stealing $:i0
from a customer. The man left f:io
with tbe clerk to be kept over night,
and when he called for it in the morn
ing Wallace had quit his job and wa*
getting out of town on a passenger
train wnen he was arrested and
searched. On his person waa found the
money that tne customei had left hioi
with the night before.
Huron— Dr. H. P. Carson returned
last weefc ftom the country west ot
Chamberlain, having spent Sunday at
Interior. The doctor says that Inter
ior is nituated in the midst of the
Bad Lands in South Dakota and is a
point of unusual interest. The Bad
Lands are first seen at Weta, one nun
dred and fifteen miles west of Cham
berlain and thence for twenty miles a
scene of unparalleled grandeur and of
wonderment greets the eye. It is
«me of the most interesting points
from a geological standpoint in the
world. A phenomenon of nature, no
where else seen and in time must
be the meeting place of thousands of
sightseers. No one who has not
crossed tbe Bad Lands can have *anv
conception of their grandeur.
Aberdeen—Catholics in this city
nave started a movement ^loosing to
the establishment of a new parochial
school to cost $20,000. Father Der
unody, of the local parish, has an
nounced that tbe first colleations will
be made next Sunday. He says tbar
ho expects to raise the entire sum
v\itbk three years thougb it is pro
posed to begin tbe erection of th
building just as soon as possible.
Worthing—Mrs. Niedmeier, wife of
a well known farmer residing near
tbis place, has proven Herself, as th
result of an interesting competition, to
be tne champion corn husker of this
part of the state. Having their own
farm work completed, Mr. and Mrs
Niedmeie- consented to aid F. E. Hart
a neighbor, with his corn husking
Hart, as an incentive to rapid work
and to discover which of tuose engaged
was the most rapid hunker, offered u
Cash prize to the peison who should
prove to be tbe cleanest husker in the
field as well as in the corn itself. Up
on examination it was found that Mrs
Niedmeier was entitled to tbe prize
and it was awarded to her.
Aberdeen The Milwaukee road
Wednesday, began the work of shorten
ing its time between Aberdeen and thu
coast quite noticeably by cutting out,
the heavy grade at Java. Anew track
wi 11 be laid for a distance of about five
miles, and the traius which stop at
Java will back into that town on a
spur, "the main track leaving that
town some distance to one side. Tbe
change will not only do away with
tlie heavy Ja\a grade, but will shor
ten the distance between Bowdle and
Mobridge a mile or two. It is esti
mated the change will save an boor's
time.
Kadoka—Through carelessness in
cooking some oysters, Mrs. J. A. Jones,
a well-known resident of this place,
figures that she is out the sum of $:j00.
It has been her custom to watch care
fully for pearls when pouring oysters
fiom a can, but a day or two ago
while emptying oysters from a can in
to a dish, she did not exercise her us
ual care and a pearl worth originally
about $800 went through the cooking
process with the oysters. Tbe intense
beat cracked the precious pearl and
rendered it valueless. It was a very
latge one, and a jeweler who examined
it states that before being heated it
was worth $300.
Pierre—Mrs. Dingman was burned to
death in the bouse on a homestead ten
miles south of Fort Pierre tbis morn
ing. All that can be learned is'from
an 8 year-old Doy.who says his mother
stavted a fire and he saw her clothes
burning and ran to a neighbor's for
help. Before assistance could be bad
tbe woman was dead. Tbe husband
was working in this city. The family
came here from Sionx Falls.
Deadwood—Charged with assault
with intent to kill William Stolls is in
the county jail while William Eiby,
his victim, lies in St. Joseph's hospital
in a precRrions condition. Stolls is ac
cused of seizing a lathing tool and
stabbing Erby oehind the right ear, in
liu-ting a deep injury.
Deadwood—Struck on tbe bead dur
inga football game a few week i ago,
Louis Wagner, aged 15, baa developed
partial paralysis and has been sent to
Chicago for special treatment under tbe
celebrated Dr. Oscbner. Young Wag
ner's case has attracted considerable'at
tention among the medical fraternity
here. He first complained after tbe
injury of paibs in the head. Signs of
paralysis appeared and tbe boy's speech
became thick and waa finally so im
paiied that he could hot be understood.
The disease then spread to bis hands
and feet and finally ho developed a
tendency to sleep twenty hours a day.
Local surgeons believe tbe injury baa
caused a tumor to form a preaaare on
tbe brain.
fwpip
MSKj&IN
100
100
Pairs of Men's Shoes
The Fain.»uh Foot
ScUulzc
The Fain.
»uh
Foot
Tickling of dry coughs, can be surely
and quijkl loosened with a prescrip
Druggists are dispensing everywhere as
Dr. Shoop's Cough Remedy And it is
so very, very different than common
cough medicines. No Opium, no Ohio
toform, absolute!v nothing harsh or un
safe. The tender leaves of a harmless
lung healing mountain shrub, given the
curative pioperties to Dr. Sh op's Cough
Remedy. Those leaves have the power
to calm the most distressing Cough and
to soothe and heal the most sensitive
bronchial membrane. Mothers should
for safety's sake alone, always demand
Dr. Shoop's. It can with perfect fiee
dom ba given to even the youngest
babies. Test it yourself! and see. Sold
by Chris Schutx,
Piauo Tuning. Fred Bchrepei,grad
uate in mgpic, is prepared to. tune
pianos, and solicits nst.rnimg* from the
citizens of Madison. All work guar
anteed to be first-class. Phone, rural
line C. No. 8.
Pin tickets, string tags, gummed la
oles—all size for sale at Daily Leader
office.
For Cash. Hard coal delivered $10
per ton.—Hayes Lucas Lbr. Co.
.Millions of bottles of Foley's
and Tar have been sold without anv
person ever haviog experienced any other
than beneficial results fi' its u^o for
coughs, cold* and lung trouble. This is
because the genuine Foley's Honey and
Tar in the yellow pack aire contains no
opiates or other harmful drugs. Guard
your health by refusing any but tbe gen
'uine. J. H. Anderson.
TREMENDOUS
STOCK REDUCTION SALE
F«r Two Weeks Commefldn THURSDAY, NOV. 12th,
anil Ending THANKSGIVING, NOV.
26th.
We want to effect a Reduction of $5,000
1[j(K. nkrmini
15 per cent Discount
15 per cent Discount on Fur Coats Ie,hanFdu're
10 per cent Discount
make. lieiruinr f4.
ScUulzc
make. lieiruinr f4.
$4 50 and $5 values, broken sizes
special, per pair
$4 50 and $5 values, broken sizes
special, per pair
Men's All Wool Underwear
Men's All Wool Underwear
Broken sizes up to $1.50 values to close Ar
out, per garment ^/3C
Broken sizes up to $1.50 values to close Ar
out, per garment ^/3C
100 Mens Fancy Vests at One-Third
Less than Regular Price.
Niagara Lights Syracuse.
Through the medium of 1,000 miles
of heavy conducting wiies. which
stretch over a distance of KW miles'in
two complete circuits of three wires
each, Syracuse, N. Y., is being illumi
nated by power from Niagara Falls
Through the medium of a good malt
tonic like golden grain belt beer one
maj insure health and happiness. The
daily use of this beverage will restore
impaired digestion and give vim and
vigor to weary brain and Mfc' Or
der of your nearest dealer.
in our store during this sale. We need the "SPOT CASH" and
you will want the goods when you see how closely we have
trimmed the prices.
We wish to impress upon the public that this is a GENUINE
BONA FIDE SALE for the purpose of raising CASH. Nothing
is reserved in this sale and we are ready to forfeit the sum of
$100 to anyone who proves that a single mark has been altered
or raised for the purpose of this sale.
REDUCTION SALE PRICES
on
/O LHMUUIH
You will find this the SQUAREST sale ever held in your city
LAKE COUNTY CLOTHING CO.j0SS.
Special
our entire line of Men's, Youths'and
Boys Fancy SU|TS and
YOU SAVE JUST ONE-FIFTH ON YOUR PURCHASE.
guaranteed to give satisfaction. We have a large line to select fron).
Pairs of Men's Shoes
$1.75 Suit Cases, special dur- (M 'IC
ing the sale *3
"MONARCH" White Laundried
Shirts, standard $1.00 value *70^
all over U. S., special
"MONARCH" White Laundried
Shirts, standard $1.00 value *70^
all over U. S., special
10 doz. Stiff Bosom Shirts, 75c 'JOp
and $1.00 values, to close out ^OL
175 Pairs of Boys' Knee Pants, 50
and 75c values, all sizes
special, per pair
GRINAGER BROS.
The Clothiers
Men's Overcoats
High Grade Adler "Auto
Coats", Fancy Box Coats,
Black Kersey or Beaver
Dress Coats, Plush-lined
Fur Collared Coats. Big
Assortments. Prices,
$7.50 to $30
WBRST^W
OVERCOATS
on our entire line of Black and Blue
SUITS and OVERCOATS.
on our entite line of Plush Lined and Sheep Lined
Goats. We carry a Large Assortment.
4
Knee Pants Special
fj' About 50 Pairs of Boys' Knee Pants
4/ in Cheviot, Worsted or Cassamere
Goods. Sizes 6 to 15. Regular 50c,
65c, and 76c values
0
•tW
tf .5-
39*
i
,V^£
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