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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 16, 1908, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1908-11-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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SOT
POPE PIUS X.
CELEBRATES
Anniversary of Or
dination Today.
IfeRONI IN sr. PETER'S
Edifice Crowded With Church
men and Laymen as Hia Holiness
Sings Pontifical High Mass—People
Kneel to Receive His Blessing as
Pope Is Carried Forwarded Shoul­
ders of the Noble Guard.
llome, Nov. 16.—With all the hered
itary pomp and ceremonial of the
Roman Catholic church his holiness,
Pope Pius X., celebrated today the
fti$fleth anniversary of his ordination
to the priesthood.
Devout bcli vers thronged St. Pe
ter's to hear the singing of the pon
tifical high ma3s by hie holiness. All
classes of Roman society were repre
sented, from the hi
vh
officials of the
Vatican and those of the Quirina!
Wl|o remain steadfast in the old faith
to' the street beggar and small farmer
rf the outlying country. The singing
Of mass in St. Peter's by a pope has
been a ceremony of rare occurrence
in recent yeirs, for the pontiff's daily
administrations take place in' his pri
vate chapel in the Vatican. All the
high dignitaries of the church were
eoogregated in St. Peter's, with many
Visiting churchmen and 1
Ionian Cath­
olic laymen.
Great ceremonies attended the
Pope's entrance into the chiirch. Seat
ed in the sedia gestatoria he was
borne in on the shoulders of officers
of the noble guard above the heads of
the people, so that the congregation
might behold the face of their spirit
Mi leader. As the figure of the pon
tiff approached, giving the sign, of
POPE PIUS X.
fcMaediction to the congregation, the
people knelt to receive his blessing.
The scene in the vast interior of the
ehurch was most impressive. In the
procession that followed the pope
were the college of cardinals, the
archbishops, bishops, prelates of the
pope's household, heads of religious
communities, the Knights of Malta,
the Knights of St. Gregory and mem
ber* of other ancient and historic
orders.
Plus X., Giuseppi Sarto, his holi
ness the pope, bishop of Rome and
Vicar of Jesus Christ, successor of St.
*Peter, prince of the apostles, supreme
pontiff of the universal church, patri
arch of the West, primate of Italy,
archbishop and metropolitan of the
Roman province and sovereign of the
temporal dominious of the holy Ro
man church since Aug. 4, 1903, was
born in Riese, Italy, June 2,1835. He
was educated at the diocesan sem
inary of Padua and ordained in 18f8.
He served as parish priest until 1875,
When he became episcopal chancellor
of the diocese of Treviso. From 1SS4
until 1893 he was bishop of Mantua,
being elevated in the latter year to
the sacred college with the title of
patriarch of Venice. Five days after
Ike death of Pope Leo XIII. he was
•feetea pope.
tndorse Woodruff for Senator.
New York, Nov. 14.—The nineteen
Republican assemblymen of Kings
Munty have adopted a resolution en
dorsing the candidacy of Timothy L.
Woodruff for the United States senate
!q succeed Thomas C. PiaW, whose
firm expires next March.
Trade Improvement Reported.
vNew York. Nov. 14.—Dip patches to
JStan's Trade Review indicate rapid
progress toward normal conditions in
trade and industry, ooaUwce being
general.
he MaM
I1BAND DUKE ALEXIS DEAD
llnde «f Ctar
Expires t|
Pneumonia.
Paris, Nov. 16.—Grand Duke Alexli
if Russia, an uncle of the emperor,
lied in this city of pneumonia.
The grand duke has lived in Paris
ilmost continuously since his retire
ment from the position of supreme
ilrectlon of the navy, which be had
fceld for twenty-four years.
Grand Duke Alexis was born in
1850. He resigned the supreme con
trol of the marine in June, 1905, fol
lowing savage criticism of his admin
istration of the navy, especially in
the construction of ships. Charges of
mismanagement and inefficiency
against the marine department had
been current for years and after the
war with Japan they increased ten
fold. Grand Duke Alexis himself did
not escape personal attacks and scan
dal was so busy with his name that
he was several times the subject of
public demonstrations!, notably at the
French theater in St. Petersburg, the
latter part of 1904.
The grand duke was a younger son
3f Emperor Alexander II. He visited
the United States and made an ex
tensive tour in 1872 and was given a
warm reception.
RABID DOGS CAUSE
PANIC IN INDIANA
Fully Fifty Persons Bitten at
Terre Hsutft
Chicago, Mo*. 16.—TUftjMllS pa
tients from Terre Haute, Ind., are tak
ing treatment at the Pasteur institute
because of the ravages of mad dogs
in that city and surrounding towns.
One death has occurred, business has
been demoralized for a month, 600
dogs have been killed, public sub
scriptions have been taken for vic
tims, retail merchants and business
men's associations have bjecome
aroused and a special session of thi
city council was held because of the
epidemic of rabies which has held
6way in Terre Haute.
The city practically is Isolated in
BO far as business and shopping from
neighboring towns is concerned, al
though some of the other Indiana
towns also have suffered. Two pa
tients have come to the Pasteur insti
tute from Vincennes and three from
Delphi.
After the sudden death of twelve
year-old Peter Grosse a week ago
drastic measures were taken to stamp
out the epidemic. Armed policemen
marched through the streets and shot
600 unmuzzled dogs to prevent fur
ther fatalities.
Dozens of persons hurried to Chi
cago to take treatment as soon as It
became certain that the suspected
dogs were infected with rabies. From
a public collection taken by a Terre
Haute newspaper $1,000 was sub
scribed to send those to the institute
who could not otherwise aiford it.
TALKS TO HIGH SCHOOL BOYS
President Declares Heartily In Favor
of Sports.
Washington, Nov. 10.—"Scorn to be
guilty of any foul practice in your
sports," said President Roosevelt to
the students of the Episcopal high
school of Virginia, near Alexandria,
where he and Mrs. Roosevelt had
gone by automobile to visit the school
their youngest son Quentin is attend
ing this winter. Standing on the
muddy athletic field with the sleet
pelting down on him the president
relished the athletic events of the an
nual field day and before leaving
made the few remarks to the school
mates of his son. He told them he
believed in sports with all his heart
and advised the boys to play hard
when tbey played, but also to work
hard when they worked.
"Do your level to win, but do It in
a fair way," said the president.
Pullman Company Wins Appeal.
New Orleans, Nov. 16.—In the Unit
ed States -"'routt court of appeals the
case of the Pullman company against
the Texas railroad commissiou was
again decided in favor of the Pullman
company. The case involved the or
der of the Texas commission requir
ing a reduction of about 20 per cent
in the charges of the Pullman ootn
pany in Texas.
BIG PROFIT ON TELEPHONES
Manitoban Government Made $200,000
This Year.
Winnipeg, Man., Nov. 16.—Hon.
Robert Rogers, minister of public
works of the Manitoba government,
announces that the profits of the gov
ernment telephone system this year
will be ?200,000. On Jan. 1 this year
Manitoba bought the system from the
Bell Telephone company, paying $3,
000,000 for it. The
1
promised reduc­
tion in rates has not yet been given,
but after Jan. 1 rates will be cut la
ATTACKONNENEY
AROUSES FRISCO
City Profoundly Stirred by
Attempted Murder.
DAS CHANCE TO RECOVER
Unless Blood Poison Should Develop
In Wound Famous Graft Prosecutor
Is in No Danger—Ex-Convict Who
Did the 8hooting Steadfastly Main
tains That He Alone Is Responsible
for the Act.
San Francisco, Nov. 15.—Frequently
since the earthquake and Are of 1906
have the people of San Francisco been
ttartled and aroused by revelations
and developments in the tangled maze
of the prosecutions for bribery and
corruption that followed the sudden
overthrow of Abraham Ruef and the
boodling supervisors of the Mayor
Schmitz regime, but never has the
city been more profoundly stirn 1
than by the attempted assassination
FRANCI8 J. HEN6Y.
of Francis J. Heney, the special as
sistant of the district attorney's office,
who was shot and seriously wounded
in the courtroom by Morris Haas, an
ex-convict, resident In this city, whose
past record Heney exposed a few
ween* ago after Haas had qualified as
a juror to pass upon the guilt or inno
cence of Ruef, now in the midst of
his third trial for bribery.
Mr. Heney is resting easily and un
less blood poison sets in his physi
cians declare he has a good chance
to recover. Mr. Heney was shot in
the right side of the head as he leaned
forward over a table. The bullet en
tered half an inch in front of the
right ear, ranged downward and is
lodged somewhere in the muscles of
the left side of the neck. In the
opinion of the doctors his constitu
tion is sufficiently strong Co add to
his chance of recovery.
Haas Hurried to Jail.
Haas, who did the shooting, is con
fined to the county jail at Ingleside,
several miles from the center of the
city. Abraham Ruef, ordered into
custody by Judge Lawler immediately
after the shooting, is also a temporary
prisoner in the jail, having been
locked up in the fear that he might
be made the victim of renewed vio
lence from some excited and unex
pected quarter.
The news that Heney had been shot
spread like wildfire through the city
even before the extra editions of the
papers reached the residence sections
and people in every walk of life hur
ried to swell the crowds in the down
town district. Few of those in the
street knew what disposition had
been made of Haas, who was spirited
out of rear door of the city prison
while the crowd stod in front and
driven by a circuitous route to the
distant county jail. Another subter
fuge enabled the officers to take Ruef
out of the city.
Morris Haas is a native of Wurtem
burg. G«rmanyt and has resided here
since 1876. He is forty-eight years
old and for nearly ten years, or over
since his release from the peniten
tiary, where he served a two-year
sentence for embezzlement of his em
ployer's funds, he has been engaged
in the retail liquor business. In the
course of a lengthy statement made
to the police after his arrest the pris
oner declared:
"Heney pronounced his own death
sentence that moment he denounced
me In the court."
This, as far as appears from the
facts now made public, appears to be
the attitude of Haas. He alludes
constantly to the shame and disgrace
he has experienced since Heney, sev
eral weeks ago, confronted him as he
sat in the Jurybox before a crowded
courtroom with a photograph of him
talf In itrlBM Ha hi« »t.
Aiflifi
MADISON. SOUTH DAKOTA, MONDAY NOVEMBER 16, 1908
pressed a .V: ire to be shot or
lot what 1 li.mi' and has i w
fastly declared thnt no one except
himself knew of, his preconceived de*
termination to sltiy the man who hali
exposed his sins the pp.st.
The police are-convinced that Haas
had planned carefully his attempt
Hpon ltf*. thr «l
of his home are t^e marks of num4r
ous bullet ho!er. ltiHcuttng that aoflM-'
person had been firin.a: at, a target.
Another Big Steel Plant.
Pittsburg, Nov. 1G.—After a con
ference with presidents of subsidiary
concerns W. E. Corey, president of
the United States Steel corporation,
has announced that another big steel
wheel plant, will be erected in the
Pittsburg district. The new mill will
cost in the neighborhood of
Heavy Snowfall In Michigan^
Grand ftaplds, Mich., Nov. in "hm
first heavy snow storm of the season
has been raging along the Lake Mich
igan east shore. Fourteen Inches of
snow "is reported at Muskegon and
street car traffic has been seriously
Interfered with there. Ten 1B&0S
was reported at Grand Haven.
Prominent Clergyman Injured.
New Haven, Conn., Nov. 16.—Rev.
Dr. 0. Brinley Morgan, one of the
most noted Episcopal clergymen in
Connecticut and rector of Christ's
church, was struck by an automobile
and probably fatally hurt. It is un
derstood his skull 'n«s been fractured.
Call
vv*.
Powder
moderate
Guilty of Libeling Wilfley.
Shanghai. Nov. 14.—The criminal
libel suit brought against Mr. O'Shea,
editor of the China Gazette, by Judge
Lebbeus E. Wilfley of the United
States ?xtra-territorial court here,
was decided in favor of the plaintiff.
Mr. O Shea was sentenced to two
months' Imprisonment. The trial was
held before the British court of Shang
hai. The proceedings were taken by
the British authorities at the request
Of Judge Wilfley.
Five Employes Badly Injured.
Crawford ville, Ind., Nov. 16.—Five
employes were severely injured,
thre^ possibly fatally, by an explosion
of a boiler in the engine room of the
American Milling company's stock
food factory at Linden, ten miles
rem here. The explosion' set fire to
ihe buildings, which were .burned.
P. G. Ball and F. C. Stoltznjan
—==AGENCYE==—
Insurance lands Gty Property
We have a large list of LAKE COUNT'S^ *J
FARMS for SALE at Reasonable Prices.
We have in CITY PROPERTIES some spleife
did values, in fact real SNAPS.
IN CHEAP LANDS
We hare in SOUTH DAKOTA several THOUSAND^ of
on easy terms, and in NOJITH DAKOTA we have improved or
unimproved tatmsaVfef j*'low "prices, terms to suit purchaser,
can sell you a fine'farm on CROP PAYMENT plan, one half the
crop each year, no CROP no PAY, alHO we can furnish you with
COWS on time and give you a chance to pay for them, and you all
know that the FAMOUS GOLDEN VALLEY of NORTH DAKOTA
and MONTANA is raising the GRAIN and STOCK.
In MONTANA we have several tracts, including the gT8ut
JUDITH and LAKE BASIN districts, where the conditions for
GRAIN and STOCK raising are not second to any placo in tlie
whole UNITED STATES, in the LAKE BASIN district the
Government LANDS was only opened for HOMESTEADS April
23rd, 1908, and you can procure just as good a FARM of 160 us
you ever saw anywhere. Just talk with parties that went there
with us Oct. 20th, 08, who got HOMESTEADS and purchased of
us LAND. Others are going, WHY NOT YOU?
NOVEMBER 17th, NEXT TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th, we go
again. COME,
go
at Office
Folders and Information.
Crist Rensch,
with us. We show you the LANDS FREE, and
pay your railway ticket if you BUY OUR LAND.
in 1. O. O. F. Block or Phone 232 for
BALL and STOLTZMAN.
•T-r-
Stewart
HEATERS
There are many points
about the construction
of the Stewart Heater
superior to other
makes in regard to
heating— consuming
Less Fuel
Wo have been Celling
stoves} for the past
thirty years,| always
alert in buying the
1 1 1
best brands*to trecom
mend'tootir oustoiners
The Hardware Man.
PHONE 225|
COAL
%?•&:
•'/J
•K
&
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"'r
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1'ft
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We have exclusive sale of
CADWELL'S 'ELECTRIC CUT COfFEE
At 35c per pound
'&
5n-
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
Prt»id«p*
Madison
•v'
RATES
PHONE
We handle only the^
best and deliver to
.-t-,f/** *v.',-\ .~'W
W 4 fV 7 |^, V
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r\ n
fewliMfctn '*'J*I'
REMEMBER!!!
"GOLD MEDAL" 0ffE[
At 25c per pound
The Best in Good Groceries
of All Kinds
PRESTON'S
tfr, /t,
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*—THE
mmsoNAa
1
all part* of the city ,,,
JONES BROS. GRAIN
Successor to Jones & Metcalf.
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO.
MILWAUKEE BEER
on draught at
FREJp JUiRTH'S,
J.S. MURPHY,
V
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FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
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HEAGNEY & KlUNSONS
Prioate stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
fj§t all Leading Saloons in the citfr*
L. J. AHMANN, Agent.
E W. KKTCHAfl
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HARD AND SOFT £C0At^
PHONE
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