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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, November 30, 1908, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1908-11-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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EXPLOSION
IN MINE IS
TERRIFIC
Nearly Two Hundred
Men Entombed.
UTILE HOPEflF RESCUE
Believed All Perished by Explo
sion or Subsequent Fire.
JUST DECLARED TO BE SAFE
Inspectors Left Colliery Few Min
utes Before Disaster.
Pittsburg, Nov. 30.—Between 180
and 200 men are believed to have per
ished as a result of an explosion at
the mine of the Pittsburg-Buffalo Coal
company at Marianna, Washington
county. It is not considered likely
any of the miners will be rescued
alive. The explosion was terrific and
if all were not mangled by its force
there seems little doubt that they
perished in the subsequent fire or
were suffocated by the deadly fumes.
A majority of the miners are Amer
icans.
According to the officials of the coal
company State Mine Inspector Louttit
and Mine Foreman Kennedy had just
completed a two days' examination of
the mine and had come from the mine
only three minutes before the explo
sion occurred. The surprise of these
two men was great.
The force of the explosion can be
imagined when it is known that the
heavy iron cage which carried the
men from the surface to the work
ings was blown 300 feet away from
the mouth of the shaft. Two men
who were on the cage at the time
were killed, one of them having his
head blown off.
The explosion occurred in shaft No.
2 and the only way to reach the work
ings is through that shaft, as shaft
No. 1 is not completed.
Marianna was built recently by the
Pitisburg-Buffalo Coal company. It
necessitated a great outlay of money,
as it was the intention to make the
mine up to date and the living con
ditions of the miners the same as
could be secured in a large city. The
houses were of brick construction and
each contained a bathroom. When
completed the town was said by for
eign and American mine officials to
be the most perfect mining town in
the world.
From an authoritative source it is
learned that 275 men were in the
mine at the time of the explosion.
The deputy coroner at Monongahela
says he does not think any of them
will get out alive.
The first rescuing party of sixty
was compellsd to retreat on account
of the intense heat after getting with
in a short distance of where the men
are believed to be entombed.
MANY NOTABLES TO ATTEND
Taft Will Preside at Meeting Of Con
servation Commission.
Washington, Nov. 30.—President
Elect Taft has accepted an invitation
to preside over and address a joint
conference of the national conserva
tion commission with the governors of
the states in this city Dec. 8, an event
which brings together an assemblage
of the nation's leading men in com
mercial, financial and political activ
ity. The joint conference will be in
progress four days. It will be the
first conference wherein tangible data
as to the scope of the natural re
sources in the United States will be
presented by the commission and a
practical plan mapped out whereby
conservation may be accomplished.
President Roosevelt will deliver an
address the opening day. J. J. Hill,
John Mitchell, Andrew Carnegie and
a score of other representative men
have accepted invitations to be prts
tnt. _____
Boys Fight Bloody Owt.
Rome, Ga., Nov. 30.—After hunting
together all day Bert Montaine and
John Accommassy, both fourteen
years old, quarreled and engaged in a
duel, as a result of which ooth may
die. Montaine received a load of shot
In the abdomen and left leg and Ac
commasgy's left arm was shot almost
completely off. The boys were found
lying by the side ol the road. There
WAM ttl 1^HAHMAQ
Iv
TANNERS WANT FREE HIDES
Maka Argument at Tariff Hearing at
Washington.
Washington, Nov. 30.—The tanners
•farted the contest in lively fashion
at the tariff hearing by asking the
committee to restore hides to the free
list. Fred Vogel, Jr., of Milwaukee,
Wis., declared that the tariff of 15
per cent on cattle hides did not "pro
tect" stock raisers and added that the
domestic consumption df hides and
skins was inadequate and was not in
creased or stimulated by the tariff.
When David P. Leas, a Philadelphia
manufacturer of leather, stated that
the Chicago packers had a monopoly
on hides, to which every man, woman
and child paid tribute, Representative
TSoutell suggested that the way to
break up that monopoly was to put
not only hides but shoes on the free
list.
There was so much applause over
a suggestion by Elisha Cobb of Boston
to put hides on the free list that
Chairman Payne found difficulty in
maintaining order.
ASK DUTY ON OREGON PINE
New Zealand Saw Mill Owners Forced
to Close Down.
Wellington, N. Z., Nov. 30.—The
Dominion timber trade hats been so
•eriously affected by the increasing
Importations of Oregon pine that an
influential deputation of local saw
mill owners and timber merchants
petitioned the premier to impose a
duty on Oregon lumber. Many mills
in the Dominion already have been
forced to close down and others will
have to follow suit shortly.
The premier promised that he would
appoint a royal commission to investi
gate the matter. He said that when
the present agreement expired, April
27, 1909, the government would re
fuse to renew the subsidies to steam
ers carrying timber against the inter
ests of Dominion workers, but he said
it was impossible to deal with the
question of duty before the next meet
ing of parliament.
AUSTRIAN TROOPS
IN WILD PANIC
Big Force Terror Stricken by
Belgrade, Nov. 30.—The Servian
official news agency has circulated an
extraordinary story from Cettinje,
Montenegro, setting forth the alleged
panic and flight of a body of Austrian
troops that was stationed near the
Montenegrin frontier. According to
this recital, which perhaps accounts
for the condition of panic observed
on the bourses of Vienna and Buda
pest, the report was suddenly spread
among the Austrian forces at Avtovac
and Gazko. in Herzegovina, to the
effect that the Austrian posts on the
Montenegrin frontier had been at
tacked and routed. The Austrian gar
risons at Avtovac and Gazko, totalling
some 22,000 men, were at once thrown
into a state of panic. The officers and
men lost their heads and fled in terror
in the direction of Nevesiug, abandon
ing their artillery, ammunition and
provisions.
The following day, according to the
news agency, the falsity of the re
ported attack and rout on the frontier
was shown, the panic was allayed and
the troops returned to their posts. It
is added that the two generals in com
mand of the troops at Avtovac and
Gazko have been summarily retired*
TOWN WILL BE REMOVED
Mine to Be Ooened on Site of Iron
Mountain, Mich.
Marinette, Wis., Nov. 30.—A deal
completed by Attorney F. J. Truedell
of Menominee, acting for United
States Senator Isaac Stephenson of
this city, the estate of the late S. M.
Stephenson of Menominee and other
parties with the Oliver Mining com
pany, a subsidiary company of the
United States Steel corporation, will
in all probability mean the removal
of the entire business section of the
city of Iron Mountain in the not far
distant future to a new location and
will open up a great iron mine under
the site of the First National Rank
building, the Northwestern passenger
station and other large properties in
that section. The mineral right3 are
owned by Senator Stephenson and
others. The deal will mean the prac
tlcal removal of the business section
of Iron Mountain.
Boy Confesses to Incendiarism.
Baker C'ty, Ore., Nov. 30—A series
of fires In this city during the past
tew months, which resulted in losses
amounting to $40,000, has been traced
to a fifteen-year-old boy named Golden
Ormond. He has been arrested and
has confessed his crime to detectives.
The confession alleged to have been
made by the youth reveals a morbid
desire to avenge the reprimand of a
schoolteacher and a delight in the ex
cltement which was attendant upon
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Tlie only high-class
Baking Powder sold at
a moderate price
FRANCE
STIRRED
BY REVELATiONS
Steinheil Case Still the Sen
sation of the Hour.
MOST REMARKABLE WOMAN
Accused Had Numerous
Romantic Af-
fairs With Persons of Note in Polit
ical and Artistic Circles and Is
Oalled "the Charmer of Men."
Press Prints Minute Details of Re
lations With Late President Faure.
Paris, Nov. 30.—The Steinheil case
ecntinues to be the sensation of the
hour in all France. No one ventures
to say where the revelations will end.
The political side looms larger and
larger every day and the interest
harks back always to the tragic death
in Paris in 1899 of Felix Faure, pres
ident of France. M. Faure died in the
midst of the Dreyfus excitement.
The most minute details of the
scene in the room where he expired
in the company of Madame Steinheil
are flagrantly published by even the
Republican newspapers. Up to the
present time this incident in the
career of Madame Steinheil has only
been referred to covertly. The Roy
alist and anti-Dreyfus organs are de
manding an official investigation into
the death of M. Faure and intimate
openly that M. Faure, as the insupera
ble obstacle to the leaders of the
Dreyfus agitation, was the victim of a
plot. They hav» put forward the old
allegation that M. Faure intended to
yield to the petitions of the Drey
fusards and sign an order for the re
vision of the case and that conse
quently he was poisoned.
The only reason to believe that M.
Faure did not die a natural death is
found in the fact that his body de
composed with unusual rapidity and
to offset this there are the statements
of five of the best known physicians
of Paris, who certified that he died of
cerebral hemorrhage.
The other story, that Madame Stein
heil was present when he passed
away, seems unfortunately to be tru
and great regret is expressed that cir
cumstances have now compelled the
disclosure to the wcrld of this old
scandal which the Favire family an
the friends of the former president
thought was buried with his body.
Contain No 3tate Secrets.
That letters containing evidence of
M. Faure's relations with Madam
Steinheil we-e surrendered after
his
death probably is true, but the idea
that these communications contained
compromising state secrets is rejected
by all who were behind the scenes at
the time.
With regard to the crimes them
selves—Madame Steinheil's husband
and her mother, Madame Japy, wen
found murdered in the Steinheil's
home In Paris on May 31 of this year
and at the same time Madame Stein
heil was discovered bound and ga^g^d
the net is drawing closer and closer
around the wife. Stories of her nu
merous romantic affairs with person
of note in political and artistic circles
are coming to light daily and they
prove what a remarkable woman she
was. She is now called "the charmer
of men." Her salon was dazzling!y
brilliant. Her last lover, In whose
eyes she declared she wanted to jus
tify herself, has now been discovered
and his identity furnished a clue to
the motive for the crime. He is a
wealthy widower and frankly dls
cusses his Intimacy with Madame
Steinheil. This was broken off short
ly before the murders. She had pre
viously told him she would get a
divorce and marry him. When he
learned of the murders he suspected
the truth and came to Paris. He saw
Madame Steinheil and told her never
to see him again until she had cleared
herself. The prevailing belief In
Paris is that Madame Steinheil de
liberately had her husband and
mother assassinated.
Condition of the Kaftan
Berlin, Nov. £7.—According to
bulletin issued from the new palace
at Potsdam tic co'd with which the
emperor is continues to take
its normal toure®,
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MADISON, SOVTH DAKOTA, MONDAY. NOVEMBER 30, 1908
I
Many Rescued F:om "lames.
New York, Nov. 30.—Mrs. Rebecca
Levy, thirty-five years old, leaped from
the third floor of a burning tenement
house in the Bronx with her two-year
Old daughter In her arms. Both were
seriously injured. Nearly a score of
tenants were overcome by smoke, but
were rescued by police and firemen.
The tin started in the basement and
swept quickly up the elevator shafts.
Crist Rensch,The
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The Devil
Strikers Ignore Invitation.
Perth Amboy, N. J.,
former
Stewart
HEATERS
There arejmany points
about the construction
of the Stewart Heater
sujterior to other
makes in regard to
heating— consuming*
LessJFuelw
We have been selling
stoves for the past
thirty years, always
alert in buying the
best brands to recom
mend to our oustomers
H»rwe m».
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PHONE 22$
F.
Nov.
job. The troops are still
on guard.
G.
30.—The
notice issued at the plant of the Na
tional Fire Proofing company at Keats
bey that the company would resume
operations and that the striking em
ployes who applied for work would
be taken back did not have the de
sired effect. Not a man applied for
his
i
r1-!-
Kitchen Plumbing.
Good plumbing in the kitchen is a matter of great importance
became your health depends on the sanitary conditions existing in this
room
where all food is prepared. Old fashioned sinks with cloted
in piping are lodging places for vermin, moisture and dirt which bring
about serious illness.
If the plumbing of
your
Intchen is old, unsightly and unheal-
thy, let us quote YOU a price on installing a snow-white Ifaetiwd*
Porcelain Enameled n» with open plumbing. Our prices are rea
sonable*, our work high class and what you pay foe this modern kitchen
equipment may im you money in doctor bib./
EXCELSIOR REPAIR CO.,
REMEMBER!!!
|We have exclusive sale of
CADWELL'S IELECTRIC CUT COfFEE
At 35c per pound
And ("GOLD MEDAL" COffEf
At 25c per pound
The Best in Good Groceries
All Kinds
Ball and f. Stoltzman
5AGENCY:
Insurance lands City Property
We have a large list of LAKE COUNTY
FARMS for SALE at Reasonable Prices*
We have in CITY PROPERTIES some sptei*"
did values, in fact real SNAPS.
IN CHEAP LANDS
We have in SOUTH DAKOTA several THOUSANDS of acres and
on easy terms, and in NORTH DAKOTA we have improved or
unimproved forms at very low prices, terms to suit purchaser,
can sell yon a line farm on CROP PAYMENT plan, one half the
crop each year, no CROP no PAY, also we can furnish you with
COWS on time and give you a chance to pay for them, and you all
know that the FAMOUS GOLDEN VALLEY of NORTH iAKOTA
and MONTANA is raising the GRAIN and STOCK.
In MONTANA we have several tracts, including the great
JUDITH and LAKE BASIN districts, where the conditions for
GRAIN and STOCK raising are not second to any place in the
whole UNITED STATES, in the LAKE BASIN district the
Government LANDS was only opened for HOMESTEADS April
23rd, 1908, and you can procure just as good a FARM of 160 as
you ever saw anywhere. Just talk with parties that went there
with us Oct. 20th, '08, who got HOMESTEADS and purchased of
us LAND. Others are going, WHY NOT YOU?
DECEMBER 1st, NEXT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1st, we go
again. COME, go with us. We show you the LANDS fREE, aad
pay your railway tidet if you BUY OUR LAND.
Call at Office in 1.0. O. F. Block or Phone 23^ for
Folders and Information
rah and
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