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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, December 14, 1908, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1908-12-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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angry at manner of cep*
tioa in France.
4,
REMAINS IN HIS HOTEL
...»v
lh»« HI* Arrival in Parte H« Ha#
Not Left Hi* Apartments and Haa
•i'frwK:./' Seen No One but Members of Ven
A ezuelan Colony—Believed French
•A'
Government Has Demanded a For
mal Apology.
Paris, Dor. 14.—President CMtro ot
Venezuela has made no official art
fences to the French government asi
Jtot. He la represented as furiously
•fcgry at the manner in which the
vera men is receiving him in
Franco. Since his arrival In Paria he
(has remained shut up in his apart
ments in the hotel as closely as
though he were a prisoner and, barr
ing
a few members of the Venezuelan
Qblony, he has seen nobody.
The officials of the foreign office
kave received formal orders to give
tto explanation of the government's
ittitude toward President Castro.
^\Ve ignore his presence," an official
told. "The conditions upon which the
Jfovernment Is willing to open nego
tiations have been communicated to
fcim."
What these conditions are, beyond
prohibiting President Castro from
.«iaking any political declarations, is
Sot known, but it is believed that
ttiey involve a formal apology.
The French newspapers generally
yoke fun at the "dictator" of Venezu*
•la nevertheless, they insist that thu
Slduced
overnment explain the reasons that
It to change Its
attitude
ward him.
to­
After Government Vessels Only.
S# The Hague, Dec. 14.—It was stated
in official quarters that, the seizure on
the high seas of Venezuelan merchant
Ihips or the stopping of other vorsmIsi
trading between Venezuelan ports is
tot contemplated in the present in
structions to the Dutch warships now
§n duty in Venezuelan waters. Ac
llon is to be taken only against ves
-iels connected with the Venezuelan
Xavy and the marine police service.
SEPARATE SCHOOLS LEGAL
|Cansas Court Approves Segregation
of Races.
Topeka, Kan., Dec. 14.—Cities of
Kansas may provide separate schools
lor white and negro children in the
grades below the high school, but the
achools for negro children must have
facilities and be as easy of ac
ss those provided for white chil
dren. This is a decision of the state
supreme court rendered in the case of
Certain negro children In Parsons,
Who were compelled to attend a school
Mirrounded by railroad tracks. They
tHfcd petitioned the court to be allowed
to attend the white school.
i
flERCE BATTLE IN PERSIA
Hundreds of Rebels Reported Killed
or Wounded.
Odessa, Dec. 14.—Hundreds of Per
sian rebels were killed and wounded
la a battle with a force of loyalists
under command of Ain Ed Dowleh,
according to a message received here
from Tabriz.
The rebels or constitutionalists
§ere
commanded by General Hehir
hair Khan and after a stubborn at
ck on
the
loyalist army
flee.
"sr.
were
forced
(. Wealthy Spaniard Asphyxiated.
New York, Dec. t4.—Luis Salvia, a
Wealthy Spaniard, who came here
from Havana three weeks ago espe
cially to learn English, without a
knowledge of which he said he had
Jpbund it difficult to do business in
&uba, was killed accidentally by as
phyxiation by gas in his room. A
•pubbcr tube supplying a gas heater in
His room became disconnected from
file gaspipe and the room was filled
With gas while he slept
Sent Letters as Joke.
Chicago, Dec. 14.—The mystery of
t&e "Knights of the White Death"
'letters sent to clergymen and citizens
With the threat that unless they left
large sums of money at designated
Spots they would be put to death was
cleared up when William Pollard, aged
fwenty-two, driver of a grocer's
pragon, was arrested and confessed to
sent the missives as a jqlte, ..
luvins
Ends Life on 8teamer
'Kingston, Jamaica, Dec. 14.—Sam
*el C. Smith, an American, commit
Buicide on board the steamer
IS Auguste Wilhelm In this port.
looked himself in his cabin, opened
^jypttin artery in his arm and bled
to(#|Wth. Mr. Smith is said to have
£HtY.,
.fr-lK*
from Canastota, Madison coun
v-here he was Uie Jjwpi
buslr^sa, -i
Sausage Kilts Two.
Westchester, Pa., Dec. 14.—Two
nbers of the family of George Van
of Mendenhall, Chester county,
dead and three others are ill as
result of ptomaine poisoning,
mused by sausage
procured from
local
grocery store.
PAT CROWE, EVANGELIST
Former Kidnapper Makes Initial Bow
on Platform.
Chicago, Dec. 12.—A well groomed
man with just a tinge of gray in his
hair and of distinguished appearance
addressed about 150 people at St.
Mary's hall, Evanston, on "The Crime
of Society la Dealing With the Crim
inal."
It was Pat Crowe, turned evan
gelist
The kidnapper of Eddie Cudahy
»eera#4
at ease
on the platform and
K
FAT CROWE.
saTd his little piece well, although at
times he forgot some sections, and, by
being compelled to skip to the next
ouo he remembered, ho did not add to
the logical continuity of the theme,
fie did not attempt to bo oratorical,
although at times he rose to the ocea
Bion and sent a few hot shots into the
camp ot the enemy, which, la this
oase, was "demon rum."
NOW BELIEVES HIS
FAITH WAS WRONG
lames Sharp, Humble and Pen
itent, Behind the San.
Kansas City, Dec. 12.—"The Lord
was either not with us or was on a
vacation. Now I know my faith was
wrong, that I was mistaken."
That is the statement made by
James Sharp, better known as "Adam
God," who was captured In Kansas.
It was Sharp who last Tuesday led
his followers into a battle with the
police that has already resulted in five
deaths. A. J. Selsor, aged seventy
two, an Innocent bystander, wounded
by a stray bullet, is the last of the
victims to die.
it is a penitent and humble prophet
that sits in his cell in the police sta
tion here with the responsibility of
five deaths upon him, but insists that
he acted in good faith.
"Honestly, captain," he said to Offi
cer Whitsett, "I believed that we
were doing right and that it was
Clod's will. When the bullets com
menced to hit me then I had a revela
tion. I am glad to be back and want
to stand for anything that God wills.
Oh, it is terrible, terrible.
I had a nice farm in Oklahoma and
was doing well when I believed I was
palled." he continued. "Now I have
qo money, my children have left me
and I have murdered innocent men."
Sharp professed to have received a
revelation from God to preach and he
had said that he believed tho Lord
would protect him and his flock from
harm at the hands of their enemies.
In which manner he spoke of the po
lice. The hand had gone armed ever
since they fought with the Canadian
police a year or so ago.
GIFTS TO MRS. ROOSEVELT
Articles Sent by Chinese Government
Presented.
Washington, Dec. 12.—Mrs. Roose
velt has received the gifts which were
sent from China by Special Ambassa
dor Tang Slmo Yi. They consist of a
very handsome tiger skin lined with
yellow silk and said to be one of the
largest in existence bolts of beauti
ful silk, sables and silver. The gifts
were in six large packages and were
taken to the White House by Yunk
Wi, one of the secretaries of the spe
cial embassy sent by the late emperor
Of China to thank President Roosevelt
tnd the American government for the
remission of a large portion of the
Boxer indemnity.
Heard by Senate Committee.
Washington, Dec. 12.—The senate
committee on commerce heard a
committee appointed by the national
consorvatlon commission, consisting
of W. K. Cavanaugh, president of the
Lakes to the Gulf Deep Waterways
association Governor Deneen of 111J
|ois and Governor Johnson of Minne
sota. Governors of the various states
and other advocates of a deep water
way from the Lakes to the Gulf also
were heard by the committee.
Morgan Makes Fast Run.
New York, Dec. 12.—After baring
predicted in Chicago that "any man
who is a bear on the future of this
country will go broke" J. P. Morgan
returned to New York after a remark
able trip on a special train over the
New York Central. The journey was
I made in seventeen hours and one
minute, which is one hour faster than
the Twentieth Century Melted, the
•rack train of the Central.
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Lfrom
GRAIN AMD PROVISION PRICES I NEW TRIAL NOT GRANTED
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Dec. 12.—Wheat—Dec.,
*1.05 M, May, $1.0*%. On track—No.
1 hard, $1.08% No. 1 Northern, $1.
07% No. 2 Northern, *1.057/8S 1.06%
Mo. Northern, *1.02%@1.04%.
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Dec. 12.—Wheat—To arrive
and on track—No. 1 hard, $1.08% No.
1 Northern, $1.07% No. 2 Northern,
$1.05% Dec., $1.06% May, $1.08%
July, $1.08%. Flax—To arrive and on
track, $1.43 Dec., $1.42% May, fl.45.
St Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul, Dcc. 12.—Cattle—Good to
choice steers, $5.50©6.50 fair to good,
$4
.50(?t 5.25 good to choice cows and
heifers, $3.50f/,4.50 veals, $5.25^/6.00.
Hogs—$5.00tf 5.55. Sheep—Wethers,
$4.25(^4.50 yearlings, [email protected]
spring Iambs, *6.25^16.76.
Chicago Qrain and Provisions.
Chicago, Dec. 12.—Wheat—Dec., $1.
01 May, $1.06# 1.06% July, 98%c.
Corn—Dec., 57%ffi57%c May, 61%c
Sept., 61%c. Oats—Dec., 50%c May,
52%c JuJy, 47%c Sept., 40%ifi40%c.
Pork—Jan., $15.67% May, $16.00.
Butter—Creameries, 22#30c, dairies,
21 %(ff 25c. Eggs—32c. Poultry—Tur
keys, 13c chickens, [email protected] springs,
10c.
Chicago Union 8tock Yards.
Chicago, Dec. 12.—Cattle—Beeves.
$3.40?/7.65 Texans, $3.405" 4.30 West
ern cattle, $3.30/5(5.65 stockers and
feeders, $2.60(?» 4.SO cows and heifers,
$1.50(fr4.90 calves, $6.00(38 50. Hogs
—Light, $5.00(f( 5.55 mixed, [email protected]
5.75 heavy. $5.25#5.80 rough, $5.25
?i5.40 good to choice heavy, $5.40
#5.80 pigs, $3.50(f? 4.75. Sheep, $2.50
(04.70 yearlings, $4.25g)6.00 lambs,
*4.50(^7.40.
Fsrmer Kmetf ay rram.
St. Paul, Dec. 12.—P. J. Benson, a
farmer living at Inver Grove, was In
stantly killed and James McDevitt of
the same place was painfully Injured
when a Rock Island freight train
struck the buggy they were in at a
crossing near Inver Grove. The horses
escaped injury, but the buggy was
reduced to kindling wood.
Noted Frontiersman Dead.
Kansas City, Dec. 14.—James Brice.
seventy-six years old, a frontiersman
Who carried the United States mails
from Independence, Mo., to Santa Fe
N. M., fifty years ago, is dead at his
home here. Brice was born in Ire
land and entered the mail service in
this country In 1858 and traveled the
Santa Fe trail for ten yeaars.
IT'S YOUR KIDNEYS
Dont Mistake the Causae of Your
Troubles—A Madison Citi
zen Shows^ How to
Cure Them
Many ieople never suspect their kid
neys. if suffering from a lame, weak
or aching back they think that it iH
only muscular weakness when urinary
trouble sets in they think it will soon
correct itself. And so it is with all
the other symptoms of kidney disor
ders. That is just where the danger
lieB. You must cure tnese troubles or
they may lead to diabetes or Blight's
disease. The best remedy to use is
Doan s Kidney Pills. It cures all ills
which are caused by weak or diseased
kidneys. Madison people testify to
permanent cures
"Henry A. Colburn, Madison,4^. D.,
says: "Several years ago I strained
my hack and after that endnred great
suffering
kidney complaint.
There was a dull ache through the
small of my back, accompanied by ter
rible pains in my loins and kidneys, i
knew by the unnatural appearance of
the secretions that my kidneys were
disordered and finally procured a box
of Doan's Kidney Pills at Anderson's
drug store. They helped me from the
fiist, I continued and am now well and
strong."
For Bale by all dealers. Price 50
cents. Poster-Milhnrn Co., Buffalo,
New York, sole agents for the United
States.
Remember tbe name—Dosn'B—and
take no other.
Mrs. McRaney's Experience
Mrs. M. McRsney, Prentiss, Miss.,
writes: "I was confinod to my bed for
three months with kidney and bladder
trouble and was treated by tMO pliysic
inns but failed to got relief. No human
tongue can tell how l^uffered, and I
had given up hope of ever getting well
nntil I began taking Koley'B Kidney
Remedy. After taking two bottles 1 felt
like a new person, and feel it my duty to
tell suffering women what Foley's Kid
ney Remedy did for me." J, H. Ander
son.
AUGUSr WILLIGES,
—Manufacturer of—
Fine Furs
609 4th Street,
SIOUX CITY, IOWA.
Orders lor Special Work
or Repairing Solicited.
1
v'fit,* '-"*,•// u "i
!'*,&<
:./i!
,*
Court Passes on Pennsylvania Cap
itol Conspiracy Cases.
Harrlsburg, Pa., Dec. 12.—A new
trial was refused to four of the de
fendants in the capitol conspiracy
cases by Judge George Kunkle in th
Dauphin county court, before which
the men had been tried. The defend
ants are John H. Sanderson, Phlla
delphla, the contractor for the furnish
lntfs and decorations in the $13,000,("W
capitol James Shumaker, Johns
o w n w o w a s s u e i n e n e n o
board of public grounds and building
during the period of the furnishing of
the building William P. Snyd'-r.
Spring City, former auditor general
of the state, and William L. Mathues.
former state treasurer. These men,
with Joseph M. Huston, Philadelphia
the architect of the great building,
were charged with conspiracy to
chc ut and defraud the state in con
nection with furnishing and decorat
ing the capitol, but Huston secured a
severance and his trial has not yet
come up. The four defendants were
tried la9t spring and were convicted
as charged.
NOTABLE MEETING IN LONDON
Movement for Government Owned
Cables Given Impetus.
London, Dec. 12.—The movement in
favor of government ownership of sub
marine cables received a substantial
impotus at a meeting held at the Man
slon House. The lord mayor of Lon
don presided and among thoBe pres
ent were representatives of the varl
ous linos Interested, Lord Milner, Lord
Strathcona, the "nrl of Jersey, th'
Duke of Argyle, Mr. Lemieux, thy
Canadian postmaster general Sir E/
wnrd Sassoon and a number of colo
nial representatives.
The speakers were unanimous on
the necessity of a uniform system of
cabling throughout the empire that
should be available for the masses
and Mr. Lemieux and Mr. Collins, the
agent general of Australia, pledged
their respective governments to the
support thereof.
Soldiers and Citizens Clash.
Port Townsend, Wash., Dec. 12
For the second time within a month
a conflict between artillerymen from
Fort Worden and Port Townsend citi
zens and police developed into a riot
Charles Kaiser, a bartender, wn*
beaten Into insensibility by a crowd
of poldlers who took possession of his
place. The police, aided by citizens,
finally suppressed the disturbance
Eight soldiers were arrested.
Dentist Murders Physiatail.
ITazelhurst, Miss., Dec. 12.—Dr. A
S. Pitts, a physician, was shot and
killed at his office here by Dr. Thomas
Birdsong, dentist, after a quarrel. Dr
Birdsong is a brother-in-law of Mrs
Annie Birdsong, convicted two years
ago for the killing of Dr. Butler of
Montlcello and was later pardoned by
Governor Vardaman. Dr. Birdsong
was hurried to jail before threats of
vengeance could be executed.
Pimple on Nose Causes Death.
St. Paul, Dec. 12.—John Mailer, aged
forty, prominent attorney and Mason,
died at the city hospital from blood
poisoning starting from a pimple on
the nose. Mr. Mailer was taken to the
hospital two weeks ago, after the In
flammation from the pimple had
spread over his face. The victim had
been associated for nineteen years
with the law firm of Durmeat &
Moore.
Review ef BOslness Conditions.
New York, Dee. 12.—Dispatches to
Dun's Trade Review indicate season
able conditions in the business world,
wholesale lines moving slowly be
cause of inventories, while holiday
goods are
la
vear ago.
*$®rrJr+^'" "+•,
better demand than a
Choughs that are tight, or distressing
tickling conghs, get quick and certain
help from Dr. Shoop's Cough Remedy.
On this account druggists everywher3
are favoring Dr. Shoop's Cough llein
edy. And it isentirely free from Opium
hlorofooin or any other stupefying
drug. The tender leaves of a harmless
lung healing mountainous shrub give to
Dr. Whoop's Cough Remedy its curative
properties. Those leaves have the pow
er to cure the most distressing cough,
and to soothe and to heal the most sen
sitive bronchial membrane. Mother's
should, for safety's sake alono, always
demand D». Seoop's. It can with per
feet freedom be given to even the
youngest babes. Test it ouce yourself
and see! S ild bv Chris Rchutz.
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
-. Preiident
v s V y-
Home in
where
A
Hoarse coughs and stuffy eolds that
may develop into pneumonia over night
are quickly cured by Foley's Honey and
Tar, as it soothes inflamed membranes
heals the lungs and expels the oold from
the system. J. H. Anderson.
Rheumatism
I hav found a tri»n1 ami nirr for Khi-u
mutism! Notii n-nifily that will straighten tho
distorted limbs of clironir cripples, nor turn txny
growths buck to tl.'sh tifwin. That is impossible,
lint I can now suroly kill tho pains and pangs oi
this deplorable lis.'as«.
In Germany—with a Chemist in tho City of
Darmstadt—I found the last ingredient with
which l)r. Shoop's Rheumatic Remedy was made
a perfected, dependable prescription. Without
that lust ingredient, I successfully treated many,
many cases of Rheumatism but now. at lust, it uni
formly cures all curable cases of this heretofore
much dreaded disease. Those sand-like jfruniilur
wastes, found in Rheumatic Mood seem to
dissolve
ami iass away under the action of this remedy us
freely as does surar when added to pure water.
And then, when dissolved, these ioisonous wastes
freely pass from th« system, and the cause of
Rheumatism is gone forever. There is now no
real need—no actual excuse to suffer longer with
out liulp. We sell, and in confidence recommend
Dr. Shoop's
Rheumatic Remedv
SCHUTZ A KETCHAM
THE
FARM LOANS j*AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
i" I &
C. KENNEDY,HEZ3
Vice ent.
State Bank
MADISON, S. D.
i
IAND IS THE BASIS OF
ALL WEALTH
andOthe demand for Lake County farms is increasing. If you
are search of a
a
and where your family will have the advantages
GOOD SOCIETY GOOD SCHOOLS
GOOD CHURCH FACILITIES
Then come and see me, and I will show 'Ott 1tist what you want
If you are renting land now, paying $3 to $5 annual
rental, I
will show
it to you at what you
If you want a good location in Madison
lar^e number
oi
in Madison
the
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA.
COAL
PHONE 195
Good Climate
you can raise Wheat, Oats Barley Corp, Potatoes and in
fact everything adapted to this latitude and whei#
you can successfully carry on
Dairying & Stock
yuu l'usi as good iand and sell
wil.pay
where you are in three ye^rs, and
will
give you easy terms ot payment
I
substantial buildings have been built
past season and the pit~r is steadily
growing in population.
Correspondence Solicited
Chas. B. Kennedy,
ot
out in rental
have such for vou.
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO.
MILWAUKEE BEER
on draught
at
FRED KURTH'S,
J. 8. MURPHY,
HEAGNEY & MUNSONS
Prioate stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
at all Leading Saloons in the
citjr.
L. J. AHMANN, Agent.
PHONE 236
We handle only the
best and deliver to
all parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO,
Successor to Jones & Metcalfj
E. W. KETCHAn
irill deliver promptly to any part of the city
the best grade ef
I^HARD AND JSOFT COAL
COAL
1

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