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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, January 21, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-01-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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PRESTON'S
jaMtaffiiMMrfiM
The Biff Store
fe0^THflANoSl5UN?TTME
|8'fe ONi-V thing that falls
'IS this time of
n
THE
'-1'
S'#
YE-5, Ol/R PRICED HAVE FALLEN, &UT THEY
HAVE NOT FALLEN ON SHIPPED IN "FAKE"
-STUFF. THEY HAVE FALLEN ON WHAT WE
HAVE LEFT OF THE REGULAR LINEJ OF GOOD
MERCHANDISE. IT 1-5 IMPO.S.SI&LE, YOU
KNOW, TO 5UY JU-ST EXACTLY WHAT YOU
ARE GOING TO -5ELL AND No MORE. WHAT
WE HAVE LEFT OF OUR WINTER GooD-5 WE
.SHALL -SELL AT THE FOLLOWING PRICES:
2,000 yards of Mottled and Outing Flan- *7 \/yg%
nels, 9c and 10c values, now /2C
1 lot of Plaid Dress Goods, 25c values -l
now A
1 lot of Dress Flannels, Broad Cloths and Lighter
QWeave Dress Goods to clean up re- 1 /_
*gardless of cost vylT
500 Dress Goods Remnants that are marked to sell
at LESS THAN COST.
On all our Women's, Misses'and OA 07,* Off
Children's Underwear /0 v/11
On Prints, Percales and Sheetings 10% OFF
We want to clean up all our Cloaks, Suits and
Skirts and are making Lower Prices Than Ever.
Get Busy before they are all gone.
J. A. JOHNSON.
Phone
PRESTON'S GROCERY
For your next order.
Prompt delivery.
THE MILL
HARD COAL
$10 for 2,000 Pounds
Don't Forget the FARMERS' INSTITUTE
JAN. 20 and 21
Biscuits will be made at the Taber
n a e o
LITTLE HATCHET ^LOUR
and served FREE both days.
PHONE 225
LARKIN & METCALF
©Ije
year,-
OUR PRICES ARE COMING
'r t)0WN ON SOME OF OUR*
1 'ERV BEST V/ALUE5.WF.
,)OHT WANT-^ASY LEFT*
OVERS K^USTER,
§4
S#
t*
W:$%
t.
"SfiewrT^*
MADIBOW.SOCTH DAKOTA.
TELEPHONE, N()Tm
THURSDAY, JAN. 21. 1900
RRH* Of IVBIOMPTIOM.
tj y»ar .$4 00
Ity m»!l, A month*
8.00
By mail, 8 month* 1.00
Bf mull, 1 month 86
carrier
par
w««k 10
J. K. STAHL Proprietor.
A. HTAH1.. Ra»in«» MaiUffrr.
STATE NEWS
Washington, D. C.—Kepresentative
Martin, of Houth Dakota, introduced a
bill ami-mliiJK tli« irrigation law by
pioviding that where the cost of any
project exceeds $20 au acre the secre
tary of the interior may adjust the
annual payment HO they need not ex
ceed $2 per acre each year. He also
provides for an eight hour workday ou
tne reclamation projects, and ro'jibits
Mongolian labor. Mr. Martin obtained
the adoption of a resolution for the
hoiiHe to hold memorial services in
honor of the late Representative Parker
Sunday afternoon, February 14.
Valentine, Neb. Lea Phillips of
Ko.nobud, S. D.. was found in a snow
drift yesterday frozen to death. He
started oat from Crookston, Neb on
Wednesday with a load A coal and
feed, and that was the last heard of
him until his team showed up at
Rosebud with the check reins still
ui). Searching parties started out and
found his wagon bioken down, but
his tody was not found until today,
it is thought that after he broke
down he started to lead his team to
Kosebud, but lost hi« way and finally
avi* up in tne cold. He lived at
Rosebud and was a freighter.
i Jeddes—December 29,1908, William
P.ircell died near Geddes. leaving two
daughters and a son as his heirs. One
of the daughters, Elizabeth J., is a
sister in the Catholic school at Tabor,
S. 1)., and Joseph Purcell, the son, has
not been heard of for about seven
years. The last heard of him he was
working at Creston, Io., and mailed
a letter to his father from Omaha,
Nel). There is riuite a considerable
amount of property, and the relatives
are trying to locate tne missing son,
Joseph.
.Mitchell—Some of tbe experiences of
holding down a claim are very un
pleasant, as is indicated in a letter re
ceived by Mrs. Volnev Hpink, who,
with her daughter, is holdiug down a
claim near Letumon, in the northern
part of the state. During the severe
cold weather of ten days ago Mis Spink
none early in the morning ami built a
tire in her shanty, and it took fire in
the roof. The tlaines spread eo quick
ly that she bad all she could do to
•scape with just a few clothes, not
enough to shield her from the bitter
cobl. She walked a mile to a neigh
bor's shanty,and was nearly frozen to
death when she arrived there. Her
clothing, money and everything was
burned in the shanty. The daughter
had remained at a neighoor's over
night ou account of the cold.
Hturgis— Word has been received
here that J. C. Welles and wife were
asphyxiated in Fort Collins, Colo., by
KHH from a coal stove. Mr Welles held
the position of field superintendent for
tho Fort Collins sugar plant. Mr.
Welles established the Sturgis electric
light plant years ago.
Pierre—The call of outstanding state
warrants to the amoant of $72,060, the
twentieth of this month, takes up to
register number n.W-l. This call will
take from the txeiistiry the present cash
on hand, and it is likely there will be
another call before the March tax call
has been received by the «t*te treas
urer.
Deadwood-Following a vistt to the
county hospital and poor farm near
hoie, the Lawrence county commission
ers passed a resolution authorizing tbe
construction of a modern the-proof
building,to cost from #8,000 to $12,000.
The building is to be of reinforced con
crete, bids to be advertised for at once
and the contract let at the April ses
sion of the board, so that the building
can be ready before next winter.
The present building is a fire trap,
and, as many of the occupants are
helpless, the county is in dire need of
a building that will protect tbem.
SOCIETY FILLS COURTROOM
Flocks to Sensational Divorce Case In
Edinburg.
Edlnburg, Jan. 21.—Members of the
smart set from London society were
present in large numbers for the hear
ing of tho much discussed Stirling
divorce case, in which cross petitions
were filed by John Alexander Stirling,
former lieutenant of the King's guards
and l^alrd of Kippendavie, Perthshire,
and his wife, formerly Clara Eliza
beth Taylor of Washington, who mar
ried the Scottisti land owner in 1904
while she was appearing in London
in "The Earl and the Girl."
Both co-respondents were present
in court. Lord Northland was accom
panied by his father, Earl Ranfurly,
former governor of New Zealand
while the famous beauty, Mrs. Mabel
Louise Atherton, named by Mrs. Stir
ling, sat alone, close to the witness
box.
Mrs. McRaney's Experience
Mrs. M. Mclivney, Prentiss, Mips.,
writes: "I was confined to my bed for
three month* with kidney and bladder
trouble and was treated by tMo physic
isns but failed to got relief. No human
tongue can tell how 1 suffered, and I
htid given up hope of ever getting well
nnlil I began taking Foley's Kidney
Hetnedy. After taking two bottles I felt
like a new person, and feel it my duty to
tell suffering women what Foley's Kid
ney Remedy did for ma." J, H. Aader-
HALF MILLION FIRE LOSS
Theater Audiences at Toledo, O., Near
Panic.
Toledo, O., Jan. 21.—«Flre that
caused $500,000 damage broke out in
the theater section just as the per
formances were about to close and
only the coolness of the managers
prevented a panic in the Arcade and
Empire theaters.
When the audiences heard the rush
of the apparatus they arose In fright,
but ware assured that the tire waa
several blocks away and the per
formances were discontinued to en
able them to see It.
The fire, which started in the
Brown, Eager & Hull Hook company's
building on Summit street, complete
ly destroyed that structure, ruined the
building of the Hudson Dry Goods
company, next door, und injured half
a dozen in the neighborhood.
Mining Experiment Stations.
Washington, Jan. 21.—Representa
tive Martin of Soutji Dakota thinks
that the government should establish
mining experiment stations in the
vaiious states of the Union in which
there are known to be deposits of
precious metals, after the order of
the agricultural experiment stations,
and he has introduced a bill to this
end. The object Is to encourage the
development of the mineral resources.
Onfera Suppression ef Boycott.
Constantinople, Jan. 21.—The gov
ernment has issued instructions to
the customs authorities to take meas
ures to suppress the existing boycott
on Austrian and Bulgarian goods.
This step is taken, according to the
wording of the order, because "Aus
tria is on the point of settling her
dispute with Turkey and a decision
has been reached to establish an
agreement with Bulgaria."
Harmon to Retain Receivership.
Cincinnati, Jan. 21.—Governor Jud
son Harmon, whose resignation as re
ceiver of the Cincinnati, Hamilton and
Dayton railroad was presented before
his inauguration as governor of Ohio,
has withdrawn the resignation at the
urgent request of United States Cir
cuit. Judge Lurton and will retain con
trol of the railroad until May 1, un
lets the receivership is lifted prior to
that il Ue.
ROOSEVELT'S '98 MILE RIDE.
President Rode Seventeen Hours to
Refute Criticisms of Officers' Tests.
In the Interests of showing that his
endurance tests for army officers have
not been excessively hard, President
Roosevelt recently rode ninety-eight
miles on horseback and was none the
worse for it the next day apparently.
When he dismounted at night at the
White Ilouse door, more than seven
teen hours after having departed
therefrom, he explained, according to
a Washington dispatch, that he want
ed to "prove to the critics who have
found fault with the recent order re
quiring all army and navy officers to
take a physical test that if a president
who is not in training can ride ninety
miles plus In one day without being
laid up in bed thereby It should not be
too much to ask the men who are
supposed to be in the best of physical
training all the time to ride ninety
miles In three days."
Mounting his jumper Rorwell in
front of the White House door at 3:30
o'clock in the morning, he dismounted
at the same place at 8:40 o'clock at
night. The Journey was to Warren
ton, Va.. and back. "And Virginia
roads In the winter time," said the
president, "are not usually in the best
condition."
On the return trip the last thirty
miles of the journey were made in
sleet and rain, while the last fifteen
miles were In almost pitch darkness.
When he dismounted his coat and hat
were frozen stiff with sleet and Ice.
In less than an hour after returning
to the White House the president had
changed his Ice coated clothing for
evening drerfs and appeared in the din
ing room, ready for as hearty a meal
as he has oaten for a long time. If
any of the critics of his "army riding
order" had dropped in about that time
they would have been sadly disap
pointed, for the president did not show
in the least by his walk that he had
been sitting for nearly seventeen hour*
In a hard saddle.
Grief Stricken Italy.
[Offered In sympathy to Italians la Amer
ica.]
O lovety, stricken land
Of the fierce titan's home,
That wakes and throws the brand
To make of thousand lives his
priceless hecatomb
Thy dwellings, mart and Shrill*
A sepulture awaits.
Bitter as is the brine
Or ash far blown upon Meaaina'a
azure straits!
But land of every heart—
Of every dreaming soul
That homes to thee and art—
Madonna-land, we in thy sorrows
seek a part.
Who hath more right to share
(Of all the peopled earth)
Tho sorrows tliou must bear?
So many sons of thine have here
ttnlr home and hearth!
Divided by the sea.
Afar they stand and weep.
Their loves are slain in thee.
Lapped in burnt sepulture oryaonk
en In the deep!
Thy queen but yesterday
Thy little children sought,
Who hurt and moaning lay.
And as she bent to them the name
of "Mother" taught!
Bo would my own fair land
Unto thine orphaned ores
In guise of parent stand.
Oh, call her "Mother!" f* Mi
Italy's absent sons I
Ith 1L Ttcanaa ia Mew York/JUoer-
IN ftiiSSOL'RI FiATE CASES
Final Arguments in Long Battle Be
gun at Kansas City.
Kansas City, Jan. 21.—Final argu
ments in the cases of the eighteen
Missouri railways that are contesting
the state 2-cont passenger and max
imum freight rate acts on the ground
that they are confiscatory were begun
in the federal court here before Judge
Eniith McPherson. Frank Hagerman,
Who opened the argument for the rail
roads, fleclared that three companies
have shown an actual loss In carrying
passengers at 2 cents, while the re
turns from the other railroads show
profits of only 2% to 5 per cent. San
ford B. L«*»,dd of Kansas City, who fol
lowed Mr. Hagerman, opening for the
state, arseiteil that one road, the
Burlington, whose officials asserted it
had lost $630,000 in Its state freight
business in 1!J04, had, as a matter of
fact, bhown a profit of about $850,000.
Governor Herbert S. Hadley, who
had been active in these proceedings
while attorney general, will make the
principal argument for the stale.
The case has attracted widespread
attention. For many months
experts
for both sides gathered testimony to
uphold their contentions and a mass
of figures was presented during No
vember and December last.
ARGUED IN HIGHEST COURT
Cases Involving Legality of Portion
of Hepburn Law.
Washington, Jan. 20.—Argument in
the "commodities clause" cases has
been reached in the supreme court of
the United States. Attorney General
Bonaparte and Solicitor General Hoyt
appeared for the government and
John D. Johnson of Philadelphia and
Robert W. de Forest and Walker D.
11 inos of New York for the railroad
companies.
The cases involve the constitution
ality of the clause in the "Hepburn
rate law of 190fi prohibiting railroads
from carrying their own products ic
Interstate commerce.
The United States circuit court for
the Eastern district of Pennsylvania
decided against the law and the gov
ernment is asking the supreta* eeurl
to reverse that decision.
New York, Jan. 21.—Transfer ot
control of the Wisconsin Central Rail
way company took place at the Car
negie TrvyU company. Newman Erb
and associates, who some time ago
acquired options on a majority of the
company's stock, paid for these se
curities. Tiie deal involves between
$4,000,000 and $5,000,000.
A Personal Appeal
If we oould talk to you persorally
about the great merit of Foley's Honey
nnd Tar, for coutrhs, colds and lung
trouble, \ou never could be irduced to
experiment with unknown preparations
that may contain Mime harmful drags.
Foley's Honey and Tar costs you no more
and has a record of *orty years
of Ctires.
J. H. Anderson.
Foley's Orino laxative cures chronic
cnostipat ion and stimulates tee liver.
Orino regulates the bowels so they will
act naturally and you do not have to
take purgatives continuously. J. H.
Anderson.
Notice of Special Election.
Be it xeaolved by the city of Madi
son, S D.:
That notice is hereby given that a
special eleetion will be held in the
city of Madison. S. D., on Tuesday,
F'ebruary 2nd. 1909, at which time tbe
following pr( position will be submitted
to^the electors viz:
Snail fifteen thousand dolhus
($1.*),000) in I onds ot the independent
school district, No. 1, of the city of
Madison, S. D., be issued for the pur
pose of electing a public school build
ing in the said city of Madison.
The voting places shall be as follows:
In the Fiist ward, northwest jury
room in court house.
In the Second ward, firemen's ball.
In the Tbiid ward, north room, N.
L. Anderson's shop.
In the Fourth ward, office of Seaton
livery oarn.
At said election the polls shall be
open from 9 o'clock in the forenoon un
til 4 o'clock in the afternoon and no
longer.
Adopted Jan 18th, 1909.
—Geo H. Waskey,
Mayor.
Attest:
—Wm. Sat,
Auditor.
Notice of Hearing Petition for Letters
of Administration.
State of South Dakota, County of
Lake, ss. In county court. In the
matter of the estHte of Roderick D,
McGillivray, deceased. The state of
South Dakota sends greeting to Nellie
K. McUillivray. William D. McGilii
vray, Arthur R. McCiillivray, and Hai
lau CJ. McGillivray. heirs at law and
next of kiD of Roderick D. McGilli
vray, deceased, aud to all whom these
presents mav come. Notice is hereby
given that Nellie K. McGillivray bus
filed with the judge of this court, a pe
tition praying for letters of administra
tion of the estate of Roderick Mc
Gillivray, deceased, and that Satur
day, the 23rd day of .lauuary, 1909, at
{two o'clock p. m., of said day, being a
day of a regular teiui of this court,
t"-wit: of the January term, 1909, at
tbe office of the county judge, in the
city of Madison, in the county of
Lake, S. D.. has been set for hearing
said petition, when and where any
person interested may appear and
show cause why the said petition
should not he granted.
Dated at Madison, S. D., this'12th
day of January, A. D., 1909.
—J. F. Blewitt,
Judge of the County Court.
Atteit: F. R. VanSlyke, Clerk. I
3.
H. William*®, Att'y ft*^Peti
timer.
A Hot Water Bottle
PHONE 195
is one of the most convenient articles in the
home both for comfort and in sickness.
We Carry the Best Hot^iVatei^jottle_Ma^,
Two Year Guarantee
so good that with every bottle purchased at
this store we give a
that it will not leak or wear out in that lengffi
of time. If it does not give the service for two
years^bring it back and we will exchange for a
new one. We have the regular 2 and 3 quart
sizes, also combination bottle and fountain syr
inge in regular sizes.
We have these goods in several different styles
and
prices.
Jones Drug Co
CORNER DRUG STORE
COAL
PHONE 256
We handle only the
best and deliver to
all parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
Ginder—Beard Market
MEAT PRICES
Picnic Hams (California) ic
Rex Bacon, whole strip, 15c
Mutton Rib Stew 5c
Beef Brishit, Boiling 5c
Beef Rib Stews 6c
Spare Ribs 10c
Lard, A-star-1 12V2C
Why pay 15c for Lard when you can get this for 121/?
We solicit your patronage. Compare these prices
and order a
Nice Roast or a Juicy Steak
OUR SAUSAGES? THE BEST EVER.
E. W. KETCHAH
FOLEYSHONETHLVR
will deliver promptly to any part of the qlty
the best grade of
HARD AND SOFT COAL
for childrmni tafm, tare, No oplatom
Indigestion
Stomach trouble is but a symptom of, and not
in itself a true disease. Wu think of Dyspepsia,
Heart bum, and Indigestion as real diseases, yei
they are symptoms only of a curtain specific
Nerve sickness—nothing else.
It was this fuct that tlret correctly led Dr. Shoop
in the creation of that now very popular Stomach
Keinedy— I'r Shoop's Restorative, fioing direct
to the stomal nerves, alone brought that success
and favor to lr. shoopand his Restorative. With
out that original and highly vital principle, no
such lasting accomplishments were ever to be had.
For stomach distress, blew ting, biliousness, bad
breath and sallow complexion, try Dr. Shoop'i
Tablets or Liquid—and see for your-
K"Storativ
ee'f what it can and will do,
fully
recommend
We sell and chew-
Dr. Shoop's
Restorative
CHRIS SCHUTZ.
•9
Phone 260
COAL
Prevention, tho new audyCold Cure
Tablets are haiil by druggists to have
four apodal specific advantages over all
other remedies for a cold. Firrt—They
contain no Quinine, rothing harsh or
sickening. Second— I hey give almost
infltant relief. Third-ploasant to the
taste, like esady. Fourth—A bo*
48 Preventics -at 2fo.
AIBOlarge
fine for
feverish children. Sold by Chris Schutz
Hoarse coughs and stuffy eolds that
may develop into pneumonia over night
are quickly cured by Foley's Iloney and
Tar, as it soothes inilamtd membranes
heals the lungs and expels the cold from
the system. J. H. Anderson.
Why pay more, wneo you oen get, a#|
only 90 fine large cups of Dr. Shoop^s
Heolth coffee, from a2T)c prokage, bntfc
coupon on a 25c Bilv red, "No-Drip" cof
feestrainer besidee.o Look for the coup
on— I put them in ow. The satisfac
tion is, besides most berfect. Sold by
C. A. Kelley & Son.
A Valuable Tip
After exposure or when yon feel a
cold coming on take a few do«es of Fol
ey's 'ney tind Tar and it will expel the
cold from your system. It cures the
most stubborn cough* and colda, and
prevents pneumonia.
IIJ H. Anderson,

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