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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, January 27, 1909, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-01-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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Y E S O U
v
E S O V E
THAT SHOVI 15 NOT THE
OILY THINlG THAT FALLS
THIS TIME OF THE YEAR,
OUR PRICES ARE COMING
DOWN ON -SOME of ouf^
VERY best VALUES, we
DoriT
WAN%AHY LEFT-
OVERS i^^BUSTERv-
PRJCE-S HAVE FALLEN,
HAVE NOT FALLEN ON SHIPPED IN "FAKE"
STUFF.
HAVE LEFT OF THE REGULAR, LINE.S OF GOOD
MERCHANDISE. IT 1,5 IMPo5-5I5LE YOU
KNOW, TO &UY JUST EXACTLY WHAT YOU
ARE GOING TO SELL AND No MORE. WHAT
WE HAVE LEFT OF OUR WINTER GOODS WE
SHALL SELL
AT
2,0()0 yards of Mottled and Outing Flan- 171/
nels, 9c and 10c values, now /2C
1 lot of Plaid Dress Goods, 25c values
now
1 lot of Dress Flannels, Broad Cloths and Lighter
Weave Dress Goods to clean up re- 1/_ (\fC
gardless of cost /3 V-JlT
500 Dress Goods Remnants that are marked to sell
at LESS THAN COST.
On all our Women's, Misses' and OA07~ f~\CC
Children's Underwear m\3 /0 V-Jll
On Prints, Percales and Sheetings 10% OFF
We want to clean up all our Cloaks, Suits and
Skirts and are making Lower Prices Than Ever.
Get Busy before they are all gone.
For your next order.
Prompt delivery.
PRESTON'S
Y
®lje ^aily £cafcet
MiOIIOX. BOOTH DAKOTA.
TELEPHONE, NO. 269.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27, 190!)
•IBM Of IDBIVMrTIOlf.
By •»U,l y*tr 14.00
Bjr Mil, 9 months #.00
By mall, months 1.00
By mail, I month .86
By carrier p«r w««k .. 10
F. hTAHL PiopiMot,
11. A. HTAHL. BBKIBVIK*
STATE NEWS
Sioux Falls-More than 400 Knights
of Columbaa of
IOWR,
Minnesota and
Booth Dakota, beside a few scattering
delegates fiom further state? gather,
in Sioux Falls Sunday as gue^t* of
Marquette Council. No. 815 of this
city. The gatnering was the largest
K. C. event ever held in South Dakota,
•nd marked the Dig annual initiation
of the local council. Sixty-fivo candi
dates were initiated.
Pierre-The present warm weather
following the late severe cold has start
ed the streams west of the river run
ning. The ice has broken up in Bad
river and piled onto the ice in the
Miaaoari at the month of the smaller
i* th ,,,
i, .f '1H V
,5, v
V
A
1

t-'
teai
:•.
I .%•
•srrew rTtAs-
bUT
THEY HAVE FALLEN ON WHAT WE
j. A. JOHNSON.
Phone
TON'S GROCERY
THEY
THE FOLLOWING PRICED:
PHONE 225
stream, backing up the vater to a
depth of several feet. It is also re
ported that the ice in Cheyenne river is
broken up. But while a few more
warm days will make crossing the
river on the ice somewhat dangerous,
no to the present teams are yet using
the ice bridge daily.
Huron—The recent death of Mrs. Ja
cob Haar at the family homestead in
Hutchinson county is worthy of more
than pausing mention, for the reason
that she ip survived by much more
than the usual number of grandchil
dren and great grandchildren. Mrs.
Haar was 70 years of age,and had been
a resident of Hutchinson county for a
period of thirty two years She was
the mother of thirteen cnildren, of
whom five are dead. 8he had ninety
fix grandchildren and eighty-one
Krewt-grandchi ldrcn. She bad a wide
acquaintance throughout Hutchinson
and adjoining counties and was affec
tionately called "Grandma" by scoria
of people by whom she was highly
re
spected and loved.
Beresford—The interest of the farm
era of the extreme southeastern portion
of the state is centered at present in
the annual corn show and farmers' in
stitute which will be held at Beres-
1
wrrrt n,
1
f&f 5'. «.* 'Jt-.f
i
"7
W 5
ford on Thursday, Friday and Satur
day of this week. The affair will be
tin! big event of the year "in that
part of the state, and it is expected
ttie attendance will be greater thaa
at any former corn contest and farm
en' institute ever held in that region.
.John Sundberg, of Whiting, president
of the Iowa Corn Growers' association,
who scored the corn at the national
corn show at Omaha, and the state
corn show at Sioux Falls, will be pre
nant anil score the exhibits of corn.
Sioux Falls—P. T. Unruh, formerly
postmaster at Tyndall. faces a charge
bv the fedetal authorities witd an at
tempt to defrand through the United
States mails. It is claimed that he
tried to cheat the Mennonite Aid plan,
a mutual insurance organization,out of
'iirge sums of money, through the
medium of tne mails. In the com
plaint brought by the federal attor
neys in the federal court here, it is
alleged that
Unruh
mailed, at Emmett,
Neb., March 1H, 1908,a letter addressed
to David Ewert, secretaiy of tne Men
nonite Aid rian, at Mountain Lake.
Minn His object the complaint states,
WHS to defraud the mutual association.
The prosecuting witness for the govern
ment is J. A. Tracy of Sioux City.
Otuer witnesses named are Jerry Carle
ton,of Sioux Falls and Davicl Ewert of
Mountain Lake, Minn In a hearing
before United States Commissioner
White, Unrah was bound over to ap
pearance before the federal court undet
bonds of f1,000.
FIRST PIONEER
Burial of the Ashes of W.
W- Brookings at
Yankton
Yankton, Jan. 2(i Very quietly and
totally without ostentation a little
metallic box was deposited in Yankton
cemetery. It contained the ashes ot
Wilinot Wood Brookings, whose re
mains were cremated in Boston a year
ago by bis request. Cairying out an
other wish, his ashes were brought
here to be buried near Yankton, where
in the early days the name of W. W.
ISrookingH carried as much weight and
authority as ever did toe most fore
most citizen of this city. A massive
^ray granite shaft was at once placed
over the ashes, with the simple inscrip
tion: "First Pioneer, Brookings.''
This brief record is sufficient for the
pioneer, who will recall that W. W.
Brookings was one of the small oand
of "fifty riners" who risked their
lives again and again that Dakota
territory might be settled by the
whites. He WHS a member of the in
trepid band that first settled Sioux
Kails, only, after a short stay, to bt
driven out by the Indians, who killed
anl scalped Brookings' nearest neigh
bors, the AmidoiiB. who were killed by
Little Crow's baud in 18G2.
Mr. Brookings was a member of the
famous "squatter" legislature, was
pi evident of the state, and acted as
provisional governor of the territory
part of the time. He served in the
first legislature and held many promi
nent offices during the early days. He
also enjoyed the distinction of pre
euipting the first land in Dakota terri
tory, the tract being the present site of
the Queen Bee mill and Brookings is
land at Sioux Falls. The name of
Brookings is prominent in the histcry
of Yankton and her industries, and his
career, is, in'fact, very largely that of
the early history of the state. Brook
ings county was Reamed after him, as
was the county seat of the same
county. A very few of the earliest
pioneers are still alive, among them
G. W. Kingsbury. Ephriam Miner and
J. R. Hanson,all of whom were present
at tne interment of the ashes of their
early day friend.
Dututh Fireman KMiea.
TMiluth, Jan. 27.—John Kelly, a fire
man connected with headquarters of
the Are department, was instantly
killed by falling three stories from a
burning building. While he was at a
third story window or the Exchange
hotel a terrific explosion occurred,
which hurled the fireman to his death.
Lincoln's Birthday a Holiday.
"Washington. Jan. 27.—Making Feb.
12 a epccial letal holiday in the Dis
trict of Columbia and the territories
of the United States In commemora
tion of the birth of Abraham Lincoln
was the first business brought before
the house. The house passed the res
olntion nn'ie.Inuni1 ly.
Notice of Special Election.
Be it resolved bv the city council of
the city of Madison, S D.:
That notice is hereby given that a
special election will be held in the
city of Madison. S. D., on Tuesday,
February 2nd, 1909, at which time the
following proposition will be submitted
to the electors viz:
Snail fifteen thousand dollais
(#15,000) in I onds ot the Independent
school district, No. 1, of the city of
Madison, S. D., be issued for the pur
pose of erecting a public school build
ing in the said city of Madison.
The voting places shall be as follows:
In the Fitst ward, northwest jury
room in court house.
in the Second ward, firemen's hall.
In the Tbiid ward, north room, N.
L. Anderson's shop.
In the Fourth ward, office of Sea ton
livery nam.
At said election the polls shall be
open from 9 o'clock in the forenoon un
til 4 o'clock in the afternoon fuA. no
longer.
Adopted Jan 18th, 1909.
—Oeo. H. IVaskey,
Mayor.
Attest
—Wm. Rae,
Auditor.
OKLAHOMA TOWN
LOT PROBE OPEKS
Predicted That Prominent Men
Will Be Indicted.
Muskogee. Okla., Jan. 27—Special
Interest attaches to the sitting of the
federal grand Jury here to investigate
the alleged town lot frauds by reason
of the implication of the governor,
Charles N. -Haskell, in the invest^a
tlon. He, in turn, declares the entire
matter is due to the enmity of Will
iam K. Hearst. This ramification of
the case is an echo of the presiden
tial campaign of last year.
In the years 1900 and 1901 a large
number of lots were disposed of to
purchasers, who registered their
names with the movement in much
the same manner as when land is
"homesteaded." Federal authorities
now claim that unscrupulous men
scheduled the namOs of a nirmber of
"dummies" »nd thus obtained titles
to a number of lots when they were
entitled to but one. About two hun
dred and fifty persons whose names
are said to have been used in this
manner are now htere, having been
subpoenaed by the government from
Texas, Ohio. West Virginia, Tennes
see, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Missouri,
Virginia and Arkansas. They are ex
pected to testify as to what part they
had in the registering of their names
in applying for land.
It Is confidently expected by many
that several men "high up" in local
affairs will be hit by the investiga
tion.
BRITISH WORKERS'DEMANDS
Measures Advocated by Labor Party,
Now in Convention.
Portsmouth, Eng., Jan. 27.—The
ninth annual meeting of the Labor
party of Great Britain, which assem
bled here today, will discuss matters
of importance to the working people
of this country and to those in other
lands who are interested in measures
looking to their advancement. The
Labor party has thirty-one represen
tatives In parliament and it was
largely due to their efforts that the
old age pension law, which went into
effect Jan. 1, was enacted.
Among the proposals to be dis
cussed at the meeting or convention,
as it would be called In the United
States, is one fixing the old age pen
sion limit at fifty-five years and grant
ing pensions to physically incapaci
tated workers at the age of thirty.
To provide the necessary funds It is
proposed that an income tax of 2
shillings in the pound be levied on in
comes of £20,000, 3 shillings on in
comes of £30,000 and corresponding
rates up to £200,000, beyond which
all incomes shall be confiscated to the
state.
James R. MacDonald, member of
parliament for Leicester, the secre
tary of the Labor party, will submit
resolutions Including demands for the
special taxation of state conferred
monopolies, increased estate and
legacy duties and a substantial be
ginning of the taxation of land val
ues. Other resolutions will demand
ptate insurance foV workmen, the
maintenance of school children, a
universal seven-hour day, the nation
alization of land, railways, mines and
hospitals, a minimum universal wage
of .10 shillings a week and a universal
adult franchise for males and females.
SITUATION MORE SERIOUS
Bulgaria Preparing to Go to War
With Turkey.
Berlin, Jan. 27.—While It is admit
ted in German official circles that the
Bulgarian-Turkish situation has grown
more serious with the recent mobili
zation of Bulgarian reserves an im
mediate collision between the two
powers is not apprehended. It is
pointed out as an encpuraging circum
stance that the Turkish government
has made no claim for territorial com
pensation in Eastern Roumelia, but
this has been decided as not feasible
in diplomatic circles. Should Turkey,
however, claim a part of Roumelia
the situation might become critical
and Bulgaria might forthwith tab# up
arms.
Preparing to Welcome Taft.
New Orleans, Jan. 27.—Arrange
ments for the reception which the
city of New Orleans will give in honor
of President-Elect Taft and the mem
bers of his party when they return to
the United States via New Orleans
Feb. 13 are already being made. Vari
ous commercial bodies will take a
prominent part in the event, while
the city and state officials will also
contribute their share towards the
welcome.
ROOT TENDERS RESIGNATION
Robert Bacon to 8ucceed Him as Sec
retary of State.
Washington, Jan. 26.—Secretary of
State Root has tendered to President
Roosevelt his resignation, effective on
qualification of his successor, Robert
Bacon, whose nomination, along with
that of J. C. O'Loughlin to be assist
ant secretary of state in place of Mr.
Bacon, was sent to the senate.
Girnell Student Electrocuted.
ItTiaca, N. Y., Jan. 26.—On the eve
of the festivities of junior week, the
most brilliant social epoch of the Cor
nell year, the undergraduate commu
nity was shocked by the tragic death
Of Parkman Leavitt of East Orange,
N. J., a freshman in the college of
mechanical engineering. Leavitt was
tlectrocuted BY a
UYO
wire.
First Survivor to Rsach America
Tells Vivid Earthquake Tale.
"SEEMED LIKE WORLD'S END."
"Thouflht I Was In Purgatory," lay*
Giuseppe Cutroneo, Who Witneasod
Sicilian City's Fearful Fate—Tidal
Wave a Terrifying 8ight.
Giuseppe Cutroneo, a butcher of
Messina, who lost his wife and three
ehildren in the recent earthquake
tvhlch devastated Sicily, is the first
witness of the great disaster to reach
New York. In telling of his escape
from death he said in part:
"I was in the cattle business in Mes
sina, and to this fact I owe my life.
On the morning of Iec. 28 I got up at
4:15 o'clock to take a trip Into the
country to buy steers. All was quiet
as I left my home, 188 Corso Victor
Emmanuel, and walked to the station,
about a mile distant. As It happened,
the car In which I took my seat was
the last coach, which stood outside the
train shed. Had I taken a forward car
I doubtless would have been killed.
"Of a sudden the car shot up in the
air, falling with a crash on one side.
A deafening roar filled my head. The
air became suffocating. My body seem
ed to grow numb all at once. I don't
know how long I lay in a sort of stu
por before I realized that there was a
hole over me, through which 1 climbed.
"The spectacle again stupefied me. I
thought the world had come to an end
and that I was in purgatory. 1 could
not at first recognize what I saw as
Messina. Still the earth trembled, and
quakes came Intermittently, each one
toppling over walls that had been
cracked or left standing by the first
shock. I looked back at the station. It
had collapsed, and the train shed had
fallen on the forward part of the train
and crushed it almost flat.
"As soon as I realized that I was
still alive I thought of my wife and
three little children. I rushed back
into Messina, although now fires had
started in all directions. Here would
tower the flame of a broken gas main,
roaring and leaping like a gigantic
torch. There the wood skeleton of a
house blazed like a hundred bonfires in
one. The air was full of smoke and
dust, yet I could see close to the
shore a great rift, where the earth had
been torn apart. Into it many of the
houses had fallen, catching fire as
they fell, so that the smoke that rose
made the ditch look like an elongated
volcano.
"I looked Beaward and was trans
fixed by the most terrifying sight of
all. A wave was advancing toward
the city that grew as it approached
until It seemed as high as the light
house. It tumbled the ships about like
toys, turning them turtle or tossing
them on their beam ends. It came
with tremendous velocity, but to me it
seemed an age before It swept over
the lighthouse and engulfed the city,
tearing away the piers like paper and
swallowing the shore front. Far in
land it swept, extinguishing many of
the fires.
"The people running about in the
streets acted like lunatics. Some were
clambering over the ruins in their
nlghtclothes searching for relatives.
Through cracks the people that still
lived cried to those they feared were
dead. Other survivors whom I met
had wound around them bits of carpet
or bedclothes, while others had for
gotten all about apparel.
"I found only a heap of bricks,
twisted iron and wood splinters where
I used to live. The five stores had
tumbled into a heap about fifteen feet
high. My home was in a four room
flat on the first floor. It had been
burled at the bottom. Without think
ing how impossible was the task I be
gan to dig in the ruins. Down below I
could hear moans, and they made me
work like a madman.
"I would sometimes think I heard
my wife's cry, and I would yell down
Into some crevice, 'Floria, Floria, here
is your Giuseppe!' and then I would
call to my children—to Diego, my six
year-old little boy to Tony, who was
four, and Natalina, the baby. I was
still digging when some Russian sol
diers came and asked me If I did not
want something to eat. Eighty people
were in the house where I lived, and
only one or two besides myself escaped.
"For two days and a night I wan
dered about Messina until I thought
the sights of crime and death would
drive me crazy. Ghouls began to prey
upon the dead, digging up corpses to
rob them. When the soldiers caught
these fiends at work they would riddle
them with bullets.
"Never will I forget my run toward
my home. I saw many persons. Sev
eral had been injured by falling walls.
One man, with his legs broken, worked
his way painfully along, leaving a
trail of blood behind him. Again I
saw a woman crawling over a mass of
ruins, clinging to a child. God! If I
live a thousand years 1 can never for
get those sightsl Here an old man
was making his way along, searchiug
wildly among the smoking ruins for
loved ones. I saw another man scram
bling over the ruins, calling his wife's
name as I was doing. A year was
lived in that day.
"On the evening of Dec. 28'about 200
of the survivors, including myself,
went aboard the Regina Marguarita,
which the government had made use
of as a transport We were carried
to Palermo. On reaching Palermo I
went to a hospital. On my wny I met a
well dressed man. who on learning I
wanted to come to Ajoerica, gave
me
|38 for my passage."
V
COAL
is one of the most convenient articles in the
home both for comfort and in sickness.
We Carry the Best Hot Water Bottle Made,
so good that with
this store we give a
Two Guarantee
a
PHONE 195
fOIETSHONEWCAR
•top* tl&e cough and heals lunga
8tomach trouble is hut a symptom of. and not
In itsf If a t*uo dispas.. We think of Dyspepsia.
Heartburn, and Indigestion as real diseases, yet
they arc symptoms only of a curtain spedfi#
Nerv« sickness—nothing *'tfw.
It was this fact that first eorrcetly 1P1 Dr. Shoo#
In the crention of thut now very popular Stomacf
Rem .ly—Ir. Shoop's Hestonitivc. Going direct
to tin- siomaih nerves. a!om* brought that suctvsj
and favor in Or. shoopiuid his Resolutive. With
out that oriKinal and highly viw,lprinciple.no
3i.ch lafting Hccomplishnients were ever to be had.
For stomach distress, bloatinf. hilimisness. lad
breath and sallow complexion, try Dr. shoop'a
Restorative—Tablets or Liquid—and sec for your
self what it can and will do, We «*dl and chair,
fully recommend
Dr. Shoop's
Restorative
CHRIS SCHUTZ.
every bottle purchased at
that it will not leak or wear out in that length
of time. If it does not give the service for two
years bring it back and we will exchange for a
new one. We have the regular 2 and 3 quart
sizes, also combination bottle and fountain syr
inge in regular sizes.
We have these goods in several different styles
and prices.
Jones Drug
Co,
CORNER DRUG STORE Phone 260
PHONE 256
We handle only the
best and deliver to
all
MlffCT I IM'll 11 :SSOHg«iSHMI
parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.,
Regular Hams 13c
California Hams, 10c
Cudahy Rex Bacon, 15c
CINDER-BEARD
Our Own Sausage
Sealshipt OysterS Received Twice
Week.
E. W. KETCHAH
will deliver promptly to any part of the city
the best grade of
HARD AND SOFT COAL*
pdimi
y u i
COAL
MARKET
Hoarse coughs and stuffy eolda that
iuav develop into pneumonia over night
are quickly cured by Foley's Honey and
Tar, as it soothes inflami membranes
heals the lunps and expels the cold from
the system. J.U. Anderson.
A Valuable Tip
After exposure or when you feel a
cold coming on take a few doses of Fol
•VI
ne*
"ntl
Hr acd wil1
the
cold from your system. It cures the
moat Htubborn coughs and colds, and
prevents pneumonia. J. H. Anderson.
f. J. GALLAGHER
...Graduated Veterinarian
DENTISTRY and SURGEBY
A Specialty
Office and Hospital, Corner Harth
Ave. and Third Street.
MADISON SO. DAK

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