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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, February 02, 1909, Image 1

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PANAMANSDENY
RAINEnCHARSE
Reply to Accusations of II'
linois Congressman.
OBALDIA CALLSIT SLANDER
fWHIdent of Panama Issue* State
ment Contradicting Assertion That
Charles P. Taft, William Nelson
Cromwell or Roger P. Farnham
Were Interested in Certain Deals
and Strongly Defends His Acts.
Panama, Feb. 2.—The charges made
In the American congress recently by
Representative Rainey of Illinois
against Domingo de Obaldia, presi
dent of Panama, and others have
brought out denials from the presi
dent and sixteen members of the na
tional assembly. The assemblymen
have signed a statement asserting
that they were present at a meeting
In the president's office where the
contract for the exploitation of the
timber industry along the Atlantic
coast of Panama was discussed and
that during the meeting neither Pres
ident Obaldia nor any one else said or
Implied that Charles P. Taft, William
Nelson Cromwell or Roger L. Farn
ham had any direct or indirect partici-
PRESIDENT OBALDIA.
pation in the business. Concerning
some of the charges President Obal
dia has given out the following state
ment for publication:
"My attitude while in the Colom
bian congress of 1903 and my entire
puolic life are beyond the reach of
slanderers. The Amador-Arias gov-
LOCATED!
After bavins been for seven years in the OPTICAL PROFESSION in
Madison, Mr. A. F. Laity has located at THIS STORE.
EYE GLASSES
PROPERLY FITTBO.
"..J.,,
We have fitted up a very beautiful Httle roOtn for this work,
furnished in Mission style with comfortable chairs and the
necessary apparatus to make the work and the results a
success. Our Optical room is located on the ground floor
tfnd is easy of access. Every pair of glasses fitted here are
FULLY AND ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED
and you connot do better than come here first.
A N E S O N
Druggist Jeweler
Complete Optical Room A. F. Laity, Optician
erninent wa3 not overthrown, but
after the expiration of Its constitu
tional term it was defeated In a fr
election.
"At the ipeetlng in my office neither
Mr. Ehrrnan nor any outsider was
present and no mention was made of
Charles P. Taft, William Nelson Crom
vell or Ron or L. Farnham. The rail
way proposal was presented to the
assembly by a Mr. Ward and was re
jected. The assembly then enacted a
law authorizing the construction of a
railway with national funds to bo
come nutional property. Mr. Eh:
man's timber contract also was re
jected by the assembly, whore a bfM
is now being discussed regulating tti'
foreign exploitation on the Atlanta
coast between the river Conception
and Costa Rica, including the entire
Chagres valley."
TAFT VISITS CULEBRA CUT
Engineers
Approve
Plans far iMk
and Dam at Qatun.
Culebra, Panama, Feb. 2.—William
H. Taft and the engineers accompany
ing him reached here from Panama
on a special train and made a detailed
examination of the fourteen miles of
the Culebra cut. The fact that the
existing plans for the lock and dam at
Gatun are satisfactory to the visiting
engineers has created a local feeling
of optimism and the fears of delay in
the completion of the work have been
relieved. Mr. Taft expected that the
views of the engineers regarding the
situation at Gatun would be favorable
and their findings consequently did
not come as a surprise to him.
GEORGE BUSSE EXONERATED
Brother of Chicago's Mayor Accident
ally Killed Woman.
Chicago, Feb. 1.—George Busse,
Chicago, Feb. 2.—George Busse,
who accidentally shot and killed Mrs.
Lucius C. Tuckerman in the Walton
apartment building, was exonerated
from all Name by a coroner's jury.
Busse, who is a brother of Mayor
Busse, was showing a servant how to
Use a revolver when the trigger
struck against one of the chambers
that was loaded, discharging the
weapon. Mrs. Tuckermnn was dress
ing ii» her room, which is separated
from the Busse apartments by a court.
The bullet struck her and she 4 ted
soon after.*
8teamer Ten Days Overrftfe.
Philadelphia. Feb. 2.—There is con
siderable anxiety over the safety of
the German steamship Maria Rick
mers, now thirty-one days out from
Greenoch, Scotland, and more than
ten days overdue. The anxiety Is
made all the greater by the fact that
terrific storms have swept the Atlan
tic lately. The ship Is under the com
mand of Captain Rupp and carried a
of thirty-two men.
Very Cold in New-England.
Boston, Feb. 2.—Official thermom
eters give but little idea of the sever
ity of the weather conditions in New
England, for a searching northwest
wind swept over the region and drove
the cold through wraps like needles.
Hoston was officially 4 above zero,
while Eastport, Me., had exa:tly zero
WAR CLOUDS
DISSIPATED
TrtfoBalgariaii Indemnity
Deadlock Broken.
RUSSIAN PLAN ACCEPTED
Citr's Government Agrees to Pay the
$24,OCC),000 Demanded by Turkey
and to Take as Payment the
$16,-
400,000 Offered by Bulgaria—Both
Countries Directly Affected Consent
to the Proposal.
St. Petersburg, Feb. 2.—The Turko
Bulgarian deadlock over the amount
•jf money to be paid Turkey by Bul
garia because of the Bulgarian dec
laration of independence is practically
broken and the war clouds in South
eastern Europe have been dissipated
by the acceptance of a plan proposed
by Russia which reconciles in a novel
manner the Turkish claim of $24,000,
000 and the Bulgarian offer of $16,
400,000.
This plan is based on the war in
demnity of $1,600,000 a year, which,
In accordance with the Berlin treaty
of 1878, Turkey is to pay Russia for
100 years. These payments bear no
interest. The Russian proposal Is to
remit them until the Turkish claim
against Bulgaria is satisfied. Russia
will collect instead $16,400,000 from
Bulgaria in similar installments.
These payments will bear interest and
the amount of this Interest will re
coup Russia.
Bulgaria has formally assented to
this proposal and the Russian govern
ment has assurances that the plan Is
satisfactory to the Turkish govern
ment.
CLOSED BY ORDER OF COURT
Greenfield (Mass.) Bank With Depos
its of $3,000,000.
Boston, Feb. 2.—An injunction to
restrain the Greenfield Savings bank
of Greenfield, Mass., from conducting
further business was issued by Judge
Sheldon of the supreme judicial court
at the request of Savings Bank Com
missioner Jay. The bank, according
to its last statement, has deposits
from 7,000 depositors amounting to
$3,069,318. Its assets totaled $3,182,
779.
The injunction, which is a tem
porary one, is returnable Feb. 10. The
petition on which it was granted
states that examination has shown
that further conduct of the business
of the bank under present conditions
would be hazardous both to the wel
fare of the bank, of its depositors and
of the public.
The proceedings of securing an in
junction against a bank is somewhat
lUUMUAl AJ&l KiA in *hla
MADISON. SOUTH DAKOTA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1909
order that arrangements might
made by the trustees to take charge
of the situation until such time as th»
hazard to which the commissioner ob
jects has been overcome1.
MOUNTAIN LION KILLS BABV
Mother Sees Wild Beast Partially De
vour Offspring. I
Balboa, Cal., Feb. 2.—Her two-year
old boy killed by a monster mountain
Hon and the fierce beast devouring
one of the legs which it had torn from
its socket was the sight that Mr*.
Chris Brown beheld when she entered
the family tent four mites from the
Hotel del Mar.
When the mother realized what had
taken place she screamed and almost
threw herself on the lion, which
growled savagely and backed out of
the rear of the tent, carrying a
mouthful of the human flesh in its
teeth, and disappeared.
COLDEST WEATHER
OF THE WINTER
Great Snftering Among New
York City's Homeless.
New York, Feb. 2.—Swept by a bit
ing northwest wind New York city
experienced the coldest weather of
the winter. With the temperature in
some portions of the greater city
down to the zero point and the offi
cial thermometer on the weather bu
reau registering 5 degrees above zero
the suffering of the homeless during
the night must have been intense.
Two thousand applicants for food
and coffee were lined up at the Bow
ery mission during the night, which
was the largest number fed at that
place thus far this winter. In addi
tion to these 318 persons, including
twenty-four women, were given shel
ter at the city lodging house and the
pier of the charities department at
the foot of East Twenty-sixth street.
Eighteen families wve driven, from
their homes In a tenement house iu
East Seventy-seventh street by a fire.
Policemen whose pity was excited by
their sufferings from the cold went
through the adjoining houses in
search of neighbors who would give
them shelter. The fire caused little
damage.
GREAT RUSH ON COAL YARDS
Gas Supply Fails With Thermometer
Below Zero.
Oolumbus, O., Feb. 2.—With the
thermometer 10 degrees below eero
Lancaster, twenty-five miles from
here, is practically without fire. The
natural gas main from the West Vir
ginia field has broken across the Ohio
river and the city is without a supply.
Lines of people are going to the coal
yards with buckets, baskets and
wheelbarrows or anything else they
can get hold of, but the coal supply
will soon be exhausted. All the fac
tories and schools have closed.
At Upper Sandusky the natural gas
has been reduced to the lowest pres
sure and the water pipes have frozen.
The schools have been dismissed.
Billek Taken to Joliet.
Chicago, Feb. 2.—Herman Billek,
after two years' imprisonment in the
county Jail, in which he has five
times been respited from death on the
gallows, was taken to the Joliet peni
tentiary to begin a term of life im
prisonment for the murder of Mary
Vrzal. The death sentence of Billek
was commuted to life Imprisonment
by Governor Deneen.
Declares He Will Not Resign.
Jackson, Mich., Feb. 2.—"Resign?
Not in a thousand years. I am going
to defend my position and fight for
my honor," declared Warden Allen N.
Armstrong of the penitentiary here.
The prison board of control and Gov
ernor Warner met here to consider
the situation arising from the war-"
den's arrest Saturday on a charge of
bribery.
No Evidence of Wrongdoing.
Portsmouth, la., Feb. 2.—The State
bank of Portsmouth, which has been
in the hands of the state bank exam
iner since the suicide of the cashier,
C. S. Scroggins, has been reopened.
There were but few withdrawals of
deposits. The examiner reported the
bank's condition excellent and said no
evidence was found of wrongaolng by
the cashier.
Fight for Wisconsin 8enatorship.
Madison, Wis., Feb. 2.—Strong pres
sure is being brought to bear buth for
and against the re-election of United
States Senator Isaac Stephenson when
the two legislative branches again
meet in joint assembly. The primary
Investigation resolution, which has
not yet been disposed of, is the cause
of a number of the members withhold*
ing their support from
8enator
phenson.
aaaa
ia
Ste­
CANNON tlPAND
Full flavor
and
strength arc essen­
tial virtues in pepper: we test ours
for both. For example, many pep
pers you buy give off an offensive
odor when scalded that of Tone
pepper is pungent and inviting.
Tone Bros. Spices—all kinds—
possess those fine seasoning
properties which are found only
in spices of high quality. Sealed
air-tight, with no weakening, no
exposure to impurities, no loss of
Nature's goodness.
Grooere-fO Cents
Tfcers *rr
two fc!ridr. of splees
ONC'S and "othera.**
PEPPER
LSPICE
NUTMEG
GINGER
TONC FiBOS Dm Mnlnn*. I own.
NO SERIOUS DAMAGE DONE
Ipa nisfc Earthquake Only a Slight
Disturbance.
Madrid, Feb. 1.—Communication
with Southern Spain and with the
City of Barcelona is uninterrupted
and normal and the reports emanating
from Englarrtl relative to a disastrous
earthquake and tidal wave are un
true.
There was a slight earth shock at
Totana, in the province of Murcia,
but no serious damage was done
Slight shocks were also felt in the
village of Olias.
At both Totana and Olias the in
habitants fled panic stricken to the
suburbs, fearing that a disaster was
upon them such as devastated Mes
sina, Italy.
The seismic disturbance was reg
istered on the instruments of the in
Btitute at Valencia.
It is reported that the moment the
quake occurred the sun was hidden
by a dense gray cloud, which, how
ever, disappeared immediately, while
a shower of hailstones as large as
walnuts covered the ground to a
depth of several centimeters.
1
The street cleaning department had
600 men at work removing the snow
during the night, but when the cold
became intense the men suffered so
greatly that the work was discontin- I
ued.
TWO DIE IN MINE BLAST
Panic Follows Fatal Explosion in
Colliery.
Pittsburg, Feb. 1.—Two men were
killed and 300 narrowly escaped death
from an explosion of coal dust at the
Sewicklev mine of the Keystone Coal
and Coke company at Madison, Pa.
The explosion caused a panic among
300 men on the day shift and all made
a rush for the exits. With the ex
ceptlon of the two victims mentioned
all succeeded in escaping before the
firedamp settled around where they
were working.
Refuses to Give Up Office.
Columbus, O., Feb. 2.—John Sulli
van of Hamilton, Governor Harmon's
appointee to the sstate railroad com
mlssionership, was sworn in by Cap
tain Julius Armstrong of the adjutant
general's office. He demanded pos
session of the office from
J.
C. Morris
of Youngstown, the appointee of ex
Governor Harris, but Morris refused
to vacate. Sullivan said that he
would immediately bring quo war
ranto proceedings to get the office.
BAIL DECLARED FORFEITED
Broughton Brandenburgh Fails to Ap
pear for Trial.
New York, Feb. 2.—Broughton Bran
denburgh, the magazine writer who
was indicted on a charge of grand
larceny as a result of his sale to a
newspaper of an article alleged to
have been written by Grover Cleve
land, failed to appear before Justice
Dowling to answer to the indictment.
His bail of $1,500, which was given
by a bonding company, was forfeited.
A bench warrant for Brandenburgh's
arvp°t Immediately issued.
Habitual
Constipation
May tx»|)cvmaiwnll) ovc«comcl)yproper
personal efforts iKc assistance
O^thcono truly (jencjicial laxative
remedy, oj frgfi an iiir oj
To get its beneficial effects, afwayi
buy the genuine
Syrup^ftgs^Cl ixir^Sewui
manufactured by tKf
CALIFORNIA
FigSyrup Co.
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
PresidtRt'
to
Ragb
i* die Ump lor th« student or
W-FEVER
Senna,
VtfWn no longer needed astKe best of
remedies, when required, are to assist
mature and not to supplant the natur.
olfunctions, which must depend ulti«
mately upon proper- nourishment,
proper efforts,and right livinfcgencraM/.
wee-
SOLP BVALLLEAOINC MUGCfSTS
•Matteonly, regular price 50i ftr Dottle
THE
Madison State
MADISON, S. D.
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
VAL BLATZ BREWINQ CO.
MILWAUKEE BEER
on draught at
FRED KURTH'S,
J. S. MURPHY,
PETER HEAGNEY
Prioate stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
at all Leading Saloons in the city.
L. J. AHMANN, Agent.
7 1
TsWP'l
(Equipped with Smokeless Device)
the room you want to heat—suitable for any room in the
house. It has a real smokeless device absolutely preventing
smoke or snipll—turn the wick as high as you can or
as low as you like—brass font holds 4 quarts of oil
that gives out glowing heat for 9 hours. Fin
ished in japan and nickel—an ornament
anywhere. Every heater warranted.
itticr. It gives briiluat rieidy light
that makes iludyi leaiur*. Malt oi brass. aickel plated and equipped
with the latest improved central drah burner. Every (amp warranted.
U you cannot obtain the Perfection Oil Heater or Rayo Lamp
ywr dealer write to our nearest agency (or descriptive circular,
STANDARD Oil. COMPAMT
lmnnummuuu \\\\\\\\n\\\\\uu\uu\\\\\\\m\\v\\u\\\\\\\\\\^
QATAR RH
ELY'S CREAM BALM
8ure to Cive Satisfaction.
CIVRS RKLIEF AT ONCB.
It dcanses, soot hen, lieals and protects th®
diseased membraae resulting from Catarrh
end driven away a Cold in the Head quickly.
Restores the Senses of Taste and BinelL
Easy to use. Contains no injurions dru^s
Ap »lie«l into the nostrils and absorbed.
Liu03 Size, 50 cents at Druggists or by
inxil. Liquid Cream Balm for use is
atomizers, 75 cents.
ELY BR^THFRS, 66 Warr«n St.. N«w Yorft
C, KENNEDY,
Vice President.
Where yon wan! It—
When yon want itr—
No smoke—no smell—io trouble.
Often you want heat in a hurry
in some rocra in the house the fur
nace does not reach, Jt'ft so casjr to
pick up and carry A
PERFECTION Oil Healer
Im
WESTER* CANADA
I More Big Crops In 1908
60,000 settlers from the United States
In 1908. New Districts open
ed for settlement.
jJO ai res of land to
ada In August, 1908, was an In
spiration.
Many have paid the
entire cost
of their farms and had a bal
ance of from 110.00 to $20.00 per
acre as a result of one crop.
8irinc and Winter Wheat.
Oats, llarl»-y. Flax and Pena
are the principal crops, while
the wild grasses bring to per
fection the best cattle ivcr sold
on the Chicago market.
'M
\3
"il»
v'
U
A *3r
Schools and
ChuKbi'ulii
j*ar* touch
Splendid Climate, I
all localities. Rall«
moat of the settled dtatrteto, aul
prlcea for produce are always
wood. Lands may also
be
purchased
From Railway and Land
r. •vyjT' T5?
/v
1
I 4 0 'i
I' u*y ririfc '4-skkfei.v^2'L
Companies.
For pamphlets, map* aad infor
mation regarding lew Bailwsr
Kates, apply to KuperSnt«nae*t
I MnlgrmtloK, Ottawa. Custe.
ur to tb»
autUuriwd Cauaiiaa
Out.
J. M. McLACHLAN.
Box 116.
Watertown, 8. D.
"L 'J-
'if
I
9
t.
Vv^l
EACH SETTLER
160 free homestead
and 160 acres at
[onlr $3 per acre.
"A vast, rich coun
try and a contented,
rosperous people."
xtract from corre
pondence of a
[Kansas Editor,
whose
[visit to Western Can­
WM

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