OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, February 11, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-02-11/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

V
.rf
if*
mm
Sr, v
-•,
2-
t.-
a
jjH"
ft.
Vt'
§t.
fc
V
irf,
•X
g"
v
U
0*
A
I
v
If-
m*
sft
tev
0'
•y.
•.
k
V
Vv»
MW*i WMMt«* «M»
fe1 V
ihhi
%*#.,
?},,
F4'
*?.-V
&
The Big Store
of iiruoiimoii.
Mf mell,l year §4.00
•f mall, 8
month*
Btate
K*
i
RESOLVED
THAT JNOW 15 NOT THE
OMLYTHlMC THAT FALLS
THIS TIME OF THE YEAR/
OUR PRICES ARE COMING
t)CWN ON 50ME OF OUR.
,VERY BEST 1/4LUES. WE
DONT WAN^ANY LEFT-
S.OO
•7 mall, 8 month* 1.00
By
mill, 1 month
Br carrier per week 10
J. p. 8TAHL
Proprietor.
A HTA HI.. Hhii Wsiufn
of whites aud blacks.
Fonda raised by the relief organiza
tions for the earthquake victims in
Italy have reacned ${,( 14.000, this unn
^presenting contributions which
poured in from all quarters through
loading organizations This informa
4!oti is based upon a message from Am
bassador Griscom at Rome to Maj.Ueu.
Lewis,chairman ot the central commit
tee of the American Red Cross aoeietv.
the relief fund is divided as follows:
Italian government committee $2,000,
900: Italian Red Cross, 1800,000
4mer'can National Red Cross,$841,000.
A bill is before the Iowa legislature
to pay to the mother of each baby born
lb that Btate, $1. The bill provides
feat the mene shall be paid out of the
County treasuries upon receipt of a
Certificate signed by the mother and at
tending physician. The bill was in.
trodaced by Representative Folliam.
Foley's Honey and Tar clears the air
£roat,
ssages, stops the irritation in the
soothes the inflamed membranes
Sud the most obstinate cough disappears
Sore and inflamed lungs are healed and
Strengthened aud the cold is expelled
from the system. Refuse any but the
cenuinein the yellow paokase. J. H.
Anderson.
ER
V^%:
YES, OlJK PRICED HAVE FALLEN, BUT THEY
HAVE NOT FALLEN ON SHIPPED IN "FAKE"
-5TUFF. THEY HAVE FALLEN ON WHAT WE
HAVE LEFT OF THE REGULAR LINE-5 OF CooD
MERCHANDISE. IT \S IMPO-S.SI&IE, YOU
KNOW, TO BUY J\JST EXACTLY WHAT YOU
ARE GOING TO .SELL AND NO MORE. WHAT
WE HAVE LEFT OF OUR WINTER GOOD-5 WE
SHALL -SELL AT THE FOLLOWING PRICES:
2,000 yards of Mottled and Outing Flan- *f\f
nels, 9c and 10c values, now /2C
1 lot of Plaid Dress Goods, 25c values 1
now
1 lot of Dress Flannels, Broad Cloths and Lighter
Weave Dress Goods to clean up re- 1/_
gardless of cost vyll
500 Dress Goods Remnants that are marked to sell
at LESS THAN COST.
On all our Women's, Misses* and OAOJL C\CC
Children's Underwear £A3 /O v-JlT
On Prints, Percales and Sheetings 10% OFF
We want to clean up all our Cloaks, Suits and
Skirts and are making Lower Prices Than Ever.
(Jet Busy before they are all gone.
J. A. JOHNSON.
A. J. PETERS,
..SHOE REPAIRING..
Basement Jack's Restaurant
Having recently located in Madison I cor
dially solicit your orders. FIRST CLASS WORK GUARANTEED
®lje JlaiU} icaoci
MA OISOM MOUTH DAKOTA.
TELEPHONE, NO. 269.
THUKSDAY. FKH. II, 190S
—SWOW rTKr
LAID F08HUBBY
Sioux Falls Woman Surprise*
Hwf Husband and His
Charmer
Sioux Falls, Feb. 10.—The unexpect
ed return of his wife, who was supposed
to lie away, ou a visit, landed John
1
The North Dakota legislature baa
pussed a bill prohibiting too marriage
Ht that
Z11 rati and a Mrs. Johnson, with whom
'he was found in his home, in the city
1 jail, both parties iuvolved are mar
iied and have families.
Mrs. Zuraff, who went away from
town yesterday on a visit, left her
children at a small town nearby, and
returned on the next train. She dis
covered through neighbors that her
suspicions were realized. Mrs. John
son, wno is mother of two daughters,
had invaded hei home. Mrs. Zuraff
called the police, and Night Captain
Johnson and Officer John Webb accom
panied her to her home.
The husband aud Mrs. Johnson were
found in the house. He answered the
door and Mrs. Johnson was callfd from
upstairs. Mrs. Zuraff demanded the
arrest of both. What charges the wite
will prefer is not known, as both her
husband and Mrs. Johnson,tnongh they
had been dnuking, were cbthed.
However, the other woman was an
intruder in her home, and Mrs. ZuraS
insisted ou the arrest and will appear
against her husnand and the other
woman.
Threatening fwerifmese with oWJdreB
is (|uickly and safels calmed by Prevent
ics. These little Caudy Cold Cure Tab
lets should always be at hand--for
promptness is all important. Pieventics
contain no quinine, nothing harsh or
sickening. They are indeed "the stitch
in time". Carried in pocket or jju-se,
Preventics are a genuine safe guard'
a&ains.tCoMe
.vr
& '\KfcVi V
i
V
i.y
fai.-*" 1tW-'
*3? 1 jww .sA'-v' jh- .**•
2 c. Sold by CiuriaiictuU
Mi'
FARM LIFE
MESSAG!
President Tells of
Country Needs.
COMMISSION'S BEPOBT.
More Profit and Satisfaction to
farmers Should Result
From Its l/Vwk.
Washington, Feb. 9. President
Roosevelt sent to congress today u
special message transmitting the re
port of the country life commission,
appointed by him to investigate the
conditions of life
011
the farms of the
country and to make recommendations
of ways and means whereby farm life
may be made more remunerative and
attractive.
In the message the president lays
stress upon the fact that the farmers
and their families are the stay and
strength of the country aud that what
ever tends to make their lives less
burdensome or unattractive is neces
sary to the interests of the nation.
He praises the work of the members
GIFKOHIJ 1'! NCHOT
WALTER H.PAGE
^\iiPR
of the commission, wtio, as ne says,
have labored without pay and do not
uow ask compensation for their work.
The only recommendation in the mes
sage is the request for an appropria
tion of $25,000 to enable the commis
sion to digest the material it has col
lected and put it in such shape that
It will be available for the nation.
In an appendix to the message, pre
ceding the report of the commission,
the president comments ou the replies
made by a Missouri farmer to the ques
tions asked by the commission. "To
the question, "Is the supply of farm la
bor in your neighborhood satisfacto
ry?' the answer is, 'No, because the
people have gone out of the baby busi
ness,' and when asked as to the reme
dy he answers, 'Give a petition to
every mothor who gives birth to seven
living boys on American soil.'
The president's message la as fol
lows:
To the Senate and House of Repre
sentatives:
I transmit herewith the report of the
commission on country life. At the
outset I desire to point out that not
a dollar of the public money has been
paid to any commissioner for his work
on the commission.
The report shows the general condi
tion of farming life In the open coun
try and points out Its larger problems.
It Indicates ways in which the govern
ment, national and state, may show
the people how to solve some of these
problems, and it suggests a continu
ance of the work which the commis
sion began.
Method* of tho Commission.
Judging by thirty public hearings, to
which farmers and farmers' wives
from forty states and territories came,
and from 120,000 answers to printed
questions sent out by the department
of agriculture, the commission finds
that the general level of country life
Is high compared with any preceding
time or with any other land. If it has
in recent years slipped down in some
places, it has risen In more places.
Its progress has been general, if not
Uniform.
Yet farming does not yield either the
profit or the satisfaction that it ought
to yield and may be made to yield.
There Is discontent in the country and
in places discouragement. Farmers as
a class do not magnify their calling,
and the movement to the towns,
though, I am happy to say, less than
formerly, is still strong.
How Farmers Can Help Themsolvos.
Itedar intern it la helpfal to
promote discussion of ways in which
the people can help themselves. There
are three main directions in which
the farmers can help themselves—
namely, better farming, better busi
ness and better living on the farm.
Tho national department of agricul
ture, which has rendered services
equaled by no other similar depart
ment In nny other time or place the
state departments of agriculture, the
*t i(e colleges of agriculture and the
me 'hanle arts, especially through their
extension work the state agricultural
experiment stations, the Farmers' un
ion, the grange, the agrlrnitural press
and other similar agencies have all
combined to place within the reach
of the American farmer an amount
and quality of agricultural Informa
tion which IT applied would enable
him over large areas to double the
production of the farm.
The object of the commission on
country life, therefor*1, is not to help
the farmer raise better crops, but to
call lils attention to the opportunities
for better business and better living
on the farm. If country life is to be
come what It should be and what I
believe It ultimately will be—one of
the most dignified, desirable and sought
after ways of earning a living- the
farmer must take advantage not only
of the agricultural knowledge which
is at his disposal, but of the methods
which have raised and continue to
raise the standards of living and of
Intelligence in other callings.
Those engaged in all other industrial
and commercial callings have found
it necessary under modern economic
conditions to organize themselves for
mutual advantage and for the protec
tion of their own particular Interests
in relation to other interests. The
farmers of every progressive Euro
pean country have realized this essen
tial fact and have found in the co
operative system exactly the form of
business combination they need.
Now, whatever the state may do to
ward Improving the practice of
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S COMMISSION ON COUNTRY LIFE.
KEN YON UBUTTERrta.!)
ENRY WALLACE
BAlI-b:Yi
1/
culture, it Is not within the sphere of
any government to reorganize the
farmers' business or reconstruct the
social life of farming communities.
It is, however, quite within its power
to use its Influence and the machinery
of publicity which it can control for
calling public attention to the needs
and the facts. For example, it is the
obvious duty of the government to call
the attention of farmers to the grow
ing monopolization of water power.
The farmers, above all, should have
i that power, on reasonable terms, for
cheap transportation, for lighting their
homes aud for Innumerable uses in
the dally tasks on the farm.
Farmers' Own Work Needed.
It would be Idle to assert that life
on the farm occupies as good a posi
tion in dignity, desirability and busi
ness results as the farmers might
I easily give It If they chose. One of
the chief difficulties is the failure of
I country life as it exists at present to
satisfy the higher social and intellec
tual aspirations of country people.
1 Whether the constant draining away
of so much of the best elements in the
rural population Into the towps is due
chiefly to this cause or to the superior
business opportunities of city life may
be open to question. But no one at
all familiar with farm life throughout
the I'nited States can fall to recognize
the necessity for building up the life
of the farm upon its social as well as
upon its productive side.
It is true that country life has im
proved greatly In attractiveness, health
and comfort and that the farmer's
earnings are higher than they were.
But city life is advancing even more
rapidly becadse of the greater atten
tion which Is being given by the citi
zens of the towns to their own better
ment. For just this reason the Intro
duction of effective agricultural co
operation throughout the Fnlted States
is of the first Importance. Where
farmers are organized co-operatively
they not only avail themselves much
more readily of business opportunities
and improved methods, but it is found
that the organizations which bring
them together in the work of their
lives are used also for social and In
tellectual advancement.
The co-operative plan is the best
plan of organization wherever men
have the right spirit to carry it out.
Under this plan any business under
taking is managed by a committee.
Every mnn has one vote and only one
rote, and every one pots profits ac
cording to what he ftfiU w* bufs or
o •, ...'
supplies. It develops individual re
sponslbfllty and has a moral as well
as a financial value over any other
plan.
Farmer*' Problems the Whole Country's
I desire only to take counsel with
the farmers as fellow citizens. It is
not the problem of the farmers alone
that I am discussing with them, but
a problem which affects every city as
well as every farm In the country. It
Is a problem which the working farm
ers will have to solve for themselves,
but it Is a problem which also affects
in only less degree all the rest of us,
and therefore If we can render any
help toward Its solution It Is not only
our duty but our Interest to do so.
The foregoing will, I hope, make It
clear why I appointed a commission to
consider problems of farm life which
have hitherto had far too little atten
tlon and the neglect of which has not
only held back life In the country, but
also lowered the efficiency of the whole
nation. The welfare of the farmer Is
of vital consequence to the welfare of
the whole community. The strength
enlng of country life, therefore, Is the
strengthening of the whole nation.
The commission has tried to help the
farmers to see clearly their own prob
lem and to see It as a whole, to distin
guish clearly between what the gov
ernment can do and what the farmers
must do for themselves, and It wishes
to bring not only the farmers, but the
nation as a whole, to realize that the
growing of crops, though an essential
part, is only a part of country life.
Crop growing Is the essential founda
tion, but It is no less essential that the
farmer should get an adequate return
for what he grows, and It Is 110 less
essential—indeed, It Is literally vital—
that he and his wife and his children
shall lead the right kind of life.
For this reason It is of the first iin
portance that the United States depart
ment of agriculture, through which as
prime agent the ideas the commission
stands for must reach the people,
should become without delay In fact a
department of country life, fitted to
deal not only with crops, but also with
air the larger aspects of life in the open
country.
Three Need* of Country Life.
From all that has been done and
learned three great general and Imme
diate needs of country life stand out:
First.—Effective co-operation among
farmers to put them on a level with
the organized interests with which
they do business.
Second.—A new kind of schools in
the country, which shall teach the
children as much outdoors as Indoors,
and perhaps more, so that they will
prepare for country life and not, as at
present, mainly for life in town.
Third.—Better means of communica
tion, Including good roads and a par
cels post, which the country people
•re everywhere, and rightly, unani
mous in demanding.
To these may well be added better
sanitation, for easily preventable dis
eases hold several million country peo
ple in the slavery of continuous ill
health.
Organization la Necessary.
The commission points out—and I
concur iu the conclusion—that the
most important help that the govern
ment, whether national or state, can
give is to ehow the people how to go
about these tasks of organization, ed
ucation and communication with the
best and quickest results. This can
be done by the collection and spread
of information. One community can
thus be Informed of what other com
munities have done aud one country
i)f what other countries have done.
Such help by the people's govern
ment would lead to a comprehensive
plan of organization, education and
communication and make the farm
ing country better to live In, for in
tellectual and social reasons as well
ub
for purely agricultural reasons.
The government through the de
partment of agriculture does not cul
tivate any man's farm for him, but it
does put at his service useful knowl
edge that lie would not otherwise get.
In the snme way the national and
state governments might put into the
people's hands the new and right
knowledge of school work. The task
of maintaining and developing the
schools would remain, as now, with
the people themselves.
Money For Expenses
Asked.
The only recommendation I submit
Is that an appropriation of $25,000 be
provided to enable the commission to
digest the material it has collected
and to collect and to digest much
more that is within its reach and thus
complete Its work. This would enable
the commission to gather In the har
vest of suggestion which Is resulting
from the discussion it has stirred up.
The commissioners have served with
out compensation, and I do not recom
mend any appropriation for their serv
ices, but only for the expenses that
will be required to finish the task that
they have begun.
To improve our system of agricul
ture seems to me the most urgent of
the tasks which lie before us. but it
cannot, in my judgment, be effected
by measures which touch only the ma
terial and technical side of the sub
ject. The whole business and life of
the farmer must also be taken into
account. Such considerations led mo
to appoint the commission on country
life. Our object should be to help de
velop In the country community the
great ideals of community life as well
as of personal character. One of the
most Important adjuncts to this end
must be the country church, and I in
vite your attention to what the com
mission says of the country church
and of the need of an extension of
such work as that of the Young Men's
Christian association in country com
munities. Let me lay special emphasis
upon wrhat the commission says at the
terz end of Its feport on personal
A Watch Should be
There is nothing so annoying as to carry
a watch that does not tell the accurate
time of day. This can be overcome by
selecting a competent jeweler to do the
repairing and cleaning necessary to keep
it in running
order.
We have two competent jewelers and
Watchmakers in our store and can as
sure the best workmanship if you will
place your watch in their charge. We
do all repairing of jewelry and Watches
promptly, thus overcoming another an
noyance delay in the return of your
articles left for repair.
Jones Drug Co,
CORNER DRUG STORE
Ideals and locial leadership. Every
thing resolves Itself in the end Into
the question of personality. Neither
society nor government can do much
for country life unless there is volun
tary response in the personal Ideals of
the men and women who live In the
country.
Plea For Farmers' Wives.
In the development of character the
home should be more important than
the school or than society at large.
When once the basic material needs
have been met, high ideals may be
quite Independent of income, but they
cannot be realized without sufficient
Income to provide adequate founda
tion, and where the community at
large is not financially prosperous it
is impossible to develop a high aver
age personal and community ideal. In
short, the fundamental facts of hu
man nature apply to men and women
who live In the country Just as
they apply to men and women
who live in the towns. Given a suffi
cient foundation of material well be
ing, the influence of the farmers and
farmers' wives on their children be
comes the factor of first importance
in determining the attitude of the next
generation toward farr.i life. The
farmer should realize that the person
who most needs consideration on the
farm is his wife. I do not in the least
mean that she should purchase ease at
the expense of duty. Neither man nor
woman is really happy or really useful
save on condition of doing his or her
duty. If the woman shirks her duty
as housewife, as home keeper, as the
mother whose prime function it is to
bear and rear a sufficient number of
healthy children, then she is not en
titled to our regard. But If she does
her duty she is more entitled to our
regard even than the man who does
his duty, and the man should show
special consideration for her needs.
I warn my countrymen that the
great recent progress made in city life
Is not a full measure of our civiliza
tion, for our civilization rests at bot
tom on the wholesomeness, the attrac
tiveness and the completeness as well
as the prosperity of life in the country*.
The men and women on the farms
stand for what is fundamentally best
and most needed In our American life.
Upon the development of country life
rests ultimately our ability by meth
ods of farming requiring the highest
Intelligence to continue to feed and
clothe the hungry nations, to supply
the city with fresh blood, clean bodies
and clear brains that can endure the
terrific strain of modern lite. We need
the development of men in the open
country, who will be in the future, as
in the past, the stay and strength of
the nation in time of war and its guld
ing and controlling spirit in time of
peace.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT.
The White House. Feb. 9. 1009.
Inventor Oliver Dies Suddenly.
Chicago, Feb. 11.—Thomas Oliver,
the typewriter inventor, fell dead in
the Argyle avenue station of the
Northwestern Elevated railway while
on his way to Pine Bluff, Ark., whore
he was to demonstrate one of his lat
est inventions, a cotton picking de
vice. The inventor's wife was with
him and he died in her arms before a
physician could be summoned. Heart
disease is believed to have been the
cause of death.
Minority Report Rejected.
Indianapolis, Feb. 11.—The house,
by a vote of 54 to 44, rejected the
minority report to indefinitely post
pone the Proctor-Tomlinson county op
tion repeal bill. The majority report
recommending the passage of the bill
was adopted.
•late Senators Asphyxiated.
Guthrie, Okla., Feb. 11.—State Sen
ator G. O. Johnson of Fort Cobb is
dead and Senator P. J. Yeager of
Tulsa is dying here as a result of in
baling natural gas from a jet believed
to have txteu accidentally left ojtea.
Phone 260
AMENDS LAW
House of Representatives Passes
Bill Amending Bank
ruptcy Law
Washington, Feb. 10.—After devot
ing almost its entire session to consid
eration of the subject, the bouse
passed a bill making several amend
ments to the national bankruptcy law.
Clayton of Alabama made a desperate
but unsuccessful attempt to tepeal the
law, he and his supporters claiming it
had served its purpose.
The bill is designed to coirect cer
tain inequalities in the administracion
of the bankruptcy law in various paits
of tne country aud amends the law by
regulating the duties and compensa
tion of receivers in order to prevent
excessive fees. It also provides any
moneyed banking corporation, except a
in unci pal, railroad or banking corpora
tion, can file a petition for bankruptcy,
thereby eliminating the discrepancies
which heretofore existed where some
court decisions barred many corpora
tions in one circuit, which would be
admitted into bankruptcy in another,
and restores the language of the act
of 1807 which has been fully settled by
decision of the courts. It provides fur
ther that in any composition proceed
ings it will not be necessary to have
adjudication where a composition is
afteeted, thereby removing the stigma
of bankruptcy, which always attaches
under such circumstances. It prt
vents a few creditors from forcing by
involuntary proceedings a debtor in
to bankruptcy, and then, alter receiv
ing secretly theii additional compen
sation or otherwise, adjusting their
afianii with bankers in order to have
the petition dismissed without the
knowledge of the other creditors. It
enables a trustee, with the consent of
creditors, to appear in their behalf in
proceedings in court connected with hiB
discharge, thereby lessening the ex
pense by separating it from the whole
estate.
It confers ancillary jurisdiction so
that tne assets of the estate can be
marshaled substantially in one court,
obviating the tiling of suits in
ditierent courts where a property might
happen to lie. It provides also that if
a creditor has reasonable cause to be
lieve that ne was receiving a prefer
ence, that shall be a bar to the debtor's
discharge.
tolev Orino Laxative cures constipa
tion rnd liver trouble and makes the
bowels healthy and regular. Orino ia
superior to pills and tablets as it does
not gripe or nauseate. Why take any
thing else. J. 11, Anderson,
Financial Statement
No. 8,14U Ki-pnrt of tin- comiitlon of the First
National Bank, at Madison, in thy Htute of
Dakota, at the
cIobp
fV
^V
V.
J-
^If
''j.
voatlk
of business Feb. 6,1909.
HKHOl'HCEH.
Loans and discounts 4256,464.46
li verdrttfts, secured and unsecured
'whh
IB
t'. .V bonds to secure circulation m'xmii
I tionde to secure I'. W. deponita.... IS'ami iO
Bonds, securities,etc lu 1KM1
banking house, furniture and fixtures!.' s aw uo
Hue from National banks (not reserve
agents) 4Q
Due from Stat Banks and Banker#... l'ftfw'll
line from approved reserve agents •ai'.,,., ..
Clin ks and {.ther oa*h item* ... 'llfi fifl
Notec of other National hanks. a mJ) 5
Fractional paper currency, nickels uiii
cents
kjq
—jr
Lawful Money U serve in Bank viz"--"
Specif*. *22,798 86
legal tender notes 5.SH0 ml gaan«
Redemption fund with U. s. treasurer
circulation).....,,,.,, 125.00
ToUl
......25,678.37
liabiutiis.
Capital stock paidin
Surplus fund
Undivided profits,
9
1
otttl
ii*2S"}5
less expenses and
taxes paid
National bank u-ites ""tstanditi'jf*!!!!
Due to other National hanks....!*!"
Hue to state banks and bankers. ".'*,"
Individual deposits subject to chick*.!
Demand certificates of deposit........
Time certificates of deiKxrit
Cashier'* checks outstanding
United States deposits .'!....."
28.2»
ns.naa
V5i,,V KI
Saviour* deposits ...!!
ll.HHil
1\000.00
H&>,«78.ar
State of South Dakota, eannt? of takn,
I, (1. L. McCallister, rashlerof the above name*
hank, do solemnly swear that the above statement
is true to the best of my knowledge
U
rid belief
L. Mc" AIJ.hTKIi. Cashier
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 11th
day of Feb.,
11*®. Frank O. Palmer,
Notar»
Public.
Correct—Attest: F. D. E. L. Fitth.
f. BlnwtM*.
K

xml | txt