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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, April 02, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-04-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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DRUGGIST
Complete Optical Room
LOOM END SALE
Bright and Saappy, Bargain Arcay in
WALL TAPER
We are over stocked and in order to clean up
quickly will sell 2000 Double Rolls at from
5c to 10c Per Double Roll
We have a few odd rolls that we will sell at a
cent a roll. Come early and get your choice.
MADISON OPERA HOUSE
HUNT COLGROVE Props.
WIGHT THEAT RE CO.
....Presents....
*1116 (511 From the Golden WesT
OAST OF CHARACTERS
Stub West Chester Clyde
Chic Amber Wight
Mabel West Gypsie Clyde
Robt Sinclair... E. Holland
(ierald Stone J- Chas. Haynes
ONeil Hilliurd Wight
Mr. Sinclair B. Tillson
Florence Sinclair. Elfie Corbin
SYNOPSIS
ACT I—The West Hut.
ACT II.—Sinclair's Home.
ACT III.—Sinclair's Grounds.
ACT IV.—Same as Act 2.
Characters named as they appear on the stage.
To-Morrow Night
Wilton Lackaye's Great Play
'The Battle.'
I AT THE MERCY
"OFJHE WINS
Count Zeppelin's Airship in
I Perilous Journey.
FLIGHT OF ELEVEN HOURS
Stormy Weather Prevent* a Landing
and the Failure of a Motor Maket
It Impossible to Drive the Machine
Against the Wind—Drifts Aimlessl)
About Until ftmlltiQiit Permit
Landing.
Dingolfing, Germany, April 2.—The
Zeppelin airship landed safely neat
here after having been eleven hours
ID the air.
Part of this time the circumstance*
99
MATINEE SATURDAY, 2:30, "BUSTER BROWN."
A N E S O N
of the journey were perilous. TU«
rear motor refused to work and the
forward motor alone could not de
velop sufficient strength to drive the
airship against the wind.
Several anxious hours were spent
by the aeronauts before an opportu
nity offered to make a safe landing.
The airship left Friedrlchshafen
early in the morning and five hours
later appeared In the air over the out
skirts of Munich. A distance of 111
miles was covered in five hours. The
count left Friedrichshafen with the
intention of trying to sail from there
to Munich and back. It was his in
tention to land at Munich in the pres
ence of the prince regent and the en
tire garrison of Munich, but owing to
a squally and increasing wind the
maneuver was impossible. The at
tempt was made over the parade
grounds ortslde the city, but as soon
as it was seen to be impossible the
•hip was lifted again into the air.
The count then tried to return to
Munich, but by this time the wind
was so Htrr-ng that he could make no
headway against it. When the seri
ousness of the situation waft realized
the troopa were ordered out to folisw
JEWELER
A. F. Laity, Optician
the ,tM.! i j)n o 10 render
any assi.-'tancf ro.-.- .b!c.
The count endeavored to overcome
the resistance of the wind by rising
to a greater altitude, but this maneu
ver apparently was not successful,
for the balloon was driven rapidly
from the Bight of the people of Munich
in a northeasterly direction. A few
hoars later it landed near this city.
TWELVE HUNDRED
SOLDIERS ON DUTY
6uard Prisoners During Fire at
Fort Leavenworth.
Leavenworth, Kan., April 2.—It took
1,200 United States soldiers to main
tain order and to prevent prisoners
from escaping during a fire which de
stroyed four buildings of the federal
military prison here.
All the 800 prisoners were marched
out of their cellhouses when it seemed
that the whole prison certainly would
be destroyed and were held under
heavy military guard until the fire
was under control. Then after some
of the cellhouses had cooled suffi
clently they were marched back again.
The Are was discovered before mid
night by a sentry, who fired his pistol.
The fire call was sounded and the en
tire garrison at Fort Leavenworth
turned out. The Thirteenth infantry
was thrown around the prison.
The fire, which probably started in
the prison tailor shop, gained rapid
eheadway against the prison guard
working with buckets and small hose.
The fire department of Leavenworth
answered an emergency call and
'joined forces with the soldiers in a
battle against the flames. The fire
was confined to the central row of
buildings and consumed the Industrial
departments of the prison, including
the paint, tailor and carpenter shops
and the laundry. The buildings con
tataed many combustible*.
NEGRO PORTER IMPLICATED
Tries te Bribe Complainant in "Jaek"
Johnson Case.
Mew York. April 2.—Complications
have entered Into the case of "Jack"
Johnson, the world's ehampion heavy
weight pugilist, who appeared In court
to.answer a charge preferred against
him nearly two years ago here by
Almee Douglas, a colored girl of sev
enteen years. Before Johnson's ap
pearance In court Joseph Net her land,
a negro porter, was arretted charged
with attempting to bribe Miss Doug
las te stay away from court. Nether
laad said that he was a friend of
Johnson, but that the fighter knew
nothing about his alleged effort to
bribe the girl. Netherland was kept
fcl custody pending the disposition of
the case against Johnson.
After a hearing Johnson was con
victed on a charge preferred by Almee
Douglas and a fine of $200 was im
pose*.
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY. APRIL, 2, 1909
SENATE WILL
AWAIT TARIFF
Decides Not to Consider
Other Legislation.
BALE PLAN IS APPROVED
In Spite of Objection en the Part of
Some of the Membere a Majority
Votes to Do Nothing Until the
Payne Bill le Received From the
House—Heyburn Makes an Bgffnest
Plea Against Programme.
Washington, April t.—The senate,
by a viva voce vote, adopted Senator
Male's resolution to confine the touei
tt sB of the extra session to the con
siii^ration of the tariff question to the
exclusion of everything else except
the bill making provision for the thir
teenth census.
The discussion was participated in
by Senators Culberson, Bacon, Talia
t'erro, Bailey, William Alden Smith
ai• I. Heyburn. Mr. Smith objeted
that the resolution practically placed
the senate in recess until the tariff
bill is brought in.
.Mr. Heyburn made an earnest ple«
for the exception of tfc£ reports of the
committee on revisl^ of the laws,
which is preparing a recodification of
the federal statutes. He said that the
ir.mmittee has been constantly en
gaged in this work and urged that it
might just as well as not be heard at
this time when there is very little to
engage the attention of the senate
winle the tariff bill is being prepared.
Mr Heyburn expressed the opinion
that there are other important matters
of legislation besides the tariff.
Mr. Hale, however, declined to yield
to Mr. Heyburn, saying that if any
exception was made other committees
would also seek recognition, with the
result that it would be impossible to
give concentrated action to the tariff
which the president had suggested aa
necessary in order to procure expedi
tious action on that Important subject
of legislation.
ATTENDANCE' VERY SMALL
Debate on the Tariff Bill Contlnuee in
the Houee.
Washington, April 2.—The plan of
the Republican leaders to close gen
eral debate on the tariff bill having
been abandoned there was only a
slight increase in the attendance when
the house met.
Opening the day's debate Mr. Can
trill (Ky.), in his maiden speech as a
representative, discussed the tobacco
and hemp schedules. Because tobacco
was the prey of a great trust he said
it needed protection. Mr. Cantrill
urged that the bill be amended so
that they may not be discriminated
against, but that such a duty for rev
enue should be applied as would not
cripple those industries in his state
and elsewhere.
A general defense of the bill was
made by Mr. Gaines (W. Va.), a mem
bar of the committee on ways and
means. In preparing the Payne bill,
he said, the committee proceeded upon
the principle that if there was any
thing in the Dingley schedules more
than enough to protect and behind
whieh persons could combine and un
duly hold up prices the Republican
party was required to lop off that ex
eaas, "and that," be said, "we have
undertaken to do in this bi&*
REPRIMANDED BY MR. TAFT
Members Who Said He Endorsed "In
surgent" Movements.
Washington, April 2.—At a meeting
of the Republican members of the
Ohio house delegation it was agreed
to suggest to the rules committee
that the house be given an opportu
nity in connection with the Payne
bill for a separate vote on coffee, tea,
lumber and hides. The delegation
was far from being unanimous in op
position to any of the provisions of
the bill, but all agreed there should
be a vote on these items.
The general situation was much im
proved, the house leaders said. The
report was current that President Taft
had gently reprimanded some mem
bers of the house for representing him
as having endorsed "insurgent'* move
ments against the bill.
After Due Deliberation.
Washington, April 2.—Speaker Can
non, after a conference w'*h Presi
dent Taft, was asked when h« thought
the house would vote on the Payne
tariff bill. "God knows," he replied
He added that no vote would be taken
Sntil after opportunity for due delib
eration had been given.
More bunragettee uo to mii.
London, April 2.—Nine of the mill
tant female suffragettes who were ar
rested while attemjptinf to toros y
in 1 iiiin il liouff of omiwns
were arraigned in the Bow street po
lice court and sent by the magistrate
to Join their sifters in Holloway Jail
for one month. All refused to giT*»
surety for their good behavior.
Pet Dog 8aves Five Lives.
Detroit, Mich., April 2.—A pet dog
saved the lives of five members of
the family of Glenn Mott in Wyan
dotte, a suburb. Mrs Mott was awak
ened by the dog tugging at the bed
clothes and found the house in flames.
The occupants had just tin* to es
cape through a window.
WILL END DAYS IN ASYLUM
Famous Turf Plunger Blind and
Broken in Health.
Oakland. Cal., April 2.—Sightless,
broken in health and with his mind
unhinged Edward W. Purser, whose
fame as a plunger rang through all
turfdom some twelve years ago and
whose daring wagers and unfailing
luck made his name a byword wher
ever fast horses are matched in the
sport of kings, lies in the Emergency
hospital with the certainty before him
of ending his days in a state asylum
for the insane.
Fourteen years ago Purser first
came to this coast, bringing with him
a string of racers. Among them was
the famous "breadwinner," Buckwa.
At that time Purser was associated
with Riley Giannan, who died at Raw
hide, Nev., something over a year ago,
Grannan hit the down grade that year,
never to regain his place in the sport
ing world, but Purser found luck al
ways at his elbow for several years
and added to his fortune.
Gradually ill health overcame him.
however, and then his luck deserted
him and he drifted steadily along the
downward course.
GOVERNOR SMITH TO RESIGN
WIN Leave Philippines and Reeume
Practice of Law.
San Francisco, April 2.—It is re
ported here that Governor General
Smith of the Philippines will resign
his executive position and sail for
this city May 15 to resume the prac
tice of law. which he abandoned when
the Spanish-American war began.
Governor General Smith was a part
ner of Judge Frank Murasky when lie
left for the scene of hostilities in the
islands as colonel of the First regi
ment of the national guard of Cali
fornia.
LOSS OF HALF A MILLION
Little Cuban Town Practically De
stroyed by Fire.
Santiago, Cuba, April 2.—The little
town of La Maya, twenty miles north
of this city, was practically destroyed
by fire. So far as is known no lives
were lost. The loss is placed at over
$500,000. The cause of the fire is un
known. Firemen and engines were
sent out from here on a special train,
but their efforts to check the flames
were unavailing.
No
Question
as to the
Superiority
Mf
CALUMET
Baking Powder
RacafoJ Hkkaat Aww4
Verifr PrnTssJ FipiitHis
We Invite Your
Patronage**....
NEW SPRING CLOTHING
AND FURNISHINGS
The most Complete Line in the City
We showing an immence line of SUITS ^LND
CRAVENETS, made by some of the leading manu
facturers in the country, rangjug, in price from
$12.50 'to $27.50
FURNISHINGS
This department represents the newest in everything.
Every imaginable style in: 5
HATS, CAPS, SHIRTS, NECKWEAR, HOSIERY, Etc.
See our special line of Suits at $15, they are, excep
tional valuet. .* .* .*
CHAS. & KENNEDY & KENNEDY.:
ItaakUnt1
—THE
QR. a £. GULST1NE,
•.DENTIST...
€a€lclhwq jfo.
IF YOU WANT
to save time and mon
ey and get a square
deal, now is the time
to plan the Wall Dec
orations for your
home, your store,
your office.
O N'T W A
I
until you are ready to
have the work done.
Decide in advance on
your color effects, and
thus get what you
want.
am ready to show you the swellest line of
WALL PAPERS
in the city, at prices that will surprise you.'
Remember, 1 carry the largest stock in the city
and I make Saturday a special sales day* tu «how«„
a n s e o o s o e v e y o y
I carry a full line of Kalsomine, Varnish, Room
Mouldings and Plate Rails. When you come to,
town call and see what I have to offer you. .,
BURT STACY,
Madison State Bank
MADISON. S.
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
PHONE 293
Office is ratfeffkc Blk. MAMSON, S. Mk
£)R. O. ESTREM,
Pfeyskian and Surgeea
OFFICE PHONE 293
HOUSE PHONE, Crass 439
fXfjSf is Postefice Bit MADISON. S. OAK
4 i? v. -a
«'i oii'i iw» i iiniMWfBM—
l.y-IV*'k/'-f
THE
Decorator*
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4$
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F0LEY3B0NEF*X%B
rtessik* wetfi sl hMUlea^i
White Wyandotte Eggs
Seventy-five Cents
per Setting, or Three
Dollars per Hundred
Mrs. Geo. Porter^
•MIPMPPIPW
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