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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, April 19, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-04-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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DRUGGIST
Complete Optical Room
NDITIONS BAD
IN ASIA MINOR
Massacres by Ida
Hay Become General.
MANY KILLED AT ADANA
Several Hundred Moslems ani Arme
nlans Slain in Recent Rioting and
the Armenian 8ection of the Town
Destroyed—No Confirmation of Re
ported Killing of Two American
Missionaries.
Constantinople, April 1#.—The news
received here from Asia Minor is dis
tinctly alarming. There is great ex
citement among the Mussulmans at
Beirut and Erzeroum and massacres
We feared.
No confirmation has been received
here of the reported killing of two
American missionaries at Adana. The
latest intelligence received is that sev
eial hundred Armenians and Moslems
1pere killed at Adana in the rioting
•aid that the Armenian quarters of
town wry flinltv overwhelmed
*ne only high-cl*M
Baking Powder told at
a moderate price.
HEAR
The Best Spring Medicine
Cleans trp the system. Fills the arteries
with good, rich blood. Gives strength
«nd vigor to the whole body. In the
NORTH WINDOW
at..
ANDERSON'S DRUG STORE
Guaranteed under the Pure Food Law
$1 Per Bottle
and destroyed by tlames.
The British vice consul at Mersina,
Major Daughty-Wylie, was wounded in
the arm while endeavoring to quell
hostilities at Adana. I
It appears that the Armenians made
brave fight and defended their quar
ter of the town well against the fanat
ical Mohammedans, but in spite ol
their rosistance they wore driven back
and their opponents sacked their'
homes.
Three hundred Mohammedans,
armed with rifles, left Adana by train
for Tarsus, about twenty miles away.
Since the departure of these men com
munication with Tarsus has been in
terrupted. Grave apprehensions are
felt regarding the situation there.
The information In the foregoing
dispatch wan received in consular ad
vices that have come in here.
WOULD DEPOSE THE SULTAN
Thousands of Troops Reported March
ing Against Constantinople.
Berlin, April ID.—Tht Zeltung am'
MIttag publishes a dispatch from Sa
lonlki saying that 30,000 volunteers
already are marching against Constan
tinople and that volunteers are pre
senting themselves at the various bar
racks in large numbers for uniforms,
arms and ammunition. The greatest
enthusiasm prevails.
Dispatches of a soothing nature
have been received from the sultan,
who is attempting to dissuade the
men from marching against the cap
ital. but the troops are firmly resolved
to proceed.
A leader of the Young Turks, who
has Just arrived here from Constan
tinople, declared "the destiny of the
traitorous sultan is decided. Abdul
Ha mid will not complete the thirty
third year of his reign he will be de
throned before Aug. 31, the date of hit
accession."
TWO VILAYETS DESTROYED
Christians cn the Pa'as Coast At
tacked by Mussulmans.
17.—The Christians on the Paias coast
19.—The Christiana on the Paias coast
have bet n r.t talked by Mussulmans.
fw» CiirittUan vilayets lupr*
rohct I n
|i
men
[Cllol JU1J
ON
stole a so
oeees**
"B O O Z 1
A N E S O N
E,"
E,"
JEWELER
A. F. Laity, Optician
burned .• -r-d the l/i/.trist minion
is in grave danger.
SEVEN MORE ARE EXECUTED
Total of Twenty-two Mexican Rioters
Summarily Shot.
Torreon, Mex., April 19.—News
from Velardena, where the religious
riots occurred recently, tell of further
executions of rioters, when seven
were shot, making twenty-two in all
punished by death. Many of the riot
ers fled to the mountains with details
of soldiers in pursuit. During the riot,
it develops, the buildings of the Tor
reon Mercantile company, an Amer
ican concern, was attacked and dam
aged and arras, ammunition and liq
uors taken. The manager declares
that he will lay before the state de
partment at Washington a demand
for Indemnity.
WAS FIRST YANKEE MARTYR
Lowell Honors Private Taylor, Killed
in Baltimore in 1861.
Lowell, Mass., April 19.—Patriots'
day in this city was marked by the
unveiling of a monument to Charles
A. Taylor, the first soldier to fall in
defense of the Union in 1861. He was
a member of the old Sixth Massachu
setts infantry and lost his life in the
battle in the streets of Baltimore thst
has been called the first armed con
flict of the Civil war. The regiment
held a reunion here.
Today is the anniversary of the
passage of the regiment through Bal
timore on its way to Washington. It
was the first body of armed men to
reach the capital in response to Pres
ident Lincoln's call. The arrival of
the regiment was awaited with the
greatest anxiety by the president. The
soldiers were welcomed by him with:
"Thank God you are here. Had you
not arrived tonight we should have
been In the hands of the rebels before
morning."
To perpetuate the memory of Tay
lor a bronze tablet was unveiled. The
principal speaker was General Edward
F. Jones, former lieutenant governor
of New York, whr, commanded Uie
regiment.
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA. MONDAY. APHII. 19, 1909
LIloU
11,
LIloU
FARMERS WILL
FOR IT
Secretary Wilson Discusses
Corner in Wheat
LOWER PRICES TO FOLLOW
Present Abnormal Values Will Result
in Larger Acreage and Next Crop
It Likely to Be Unusually Large.
Datlare* Market Gamblers Caused
Present Conditions and the Con­
sumer Must Pay the Cost.
Washington, April 19.—"There is
sufficient wheat In the country at nor
mal prices to make bread for the
American people up to the time when
the new crop comes in," declared Sec
retary of Agriculture Wilson anent
the Chicago wheat corner, "and those
who attempt to keep prices up at pres
ent rates expect to get their money
out of the common people—the con
sumera."
Secretary Wilson's statement was
made in reply to criticisms of J. A.
Patten of Chicago of the crop reports
SECRETARY WILSON.
of the department of agriculture. Mr.
Patten not only discredited the de
partment's estimate of the wheat crop,
but said that the supply of wheat was
scarcer than the government's esti
mates showed.
"The reiwrters of the department
of agriculture are farmers living on
farms and know, if anybody knows,
and have knowledge, if anybody has
knowledge, of the facts," declared the
secretary.
"The large majority of wheat has
left the hands of the farmers," con
tinued the secretary. "A fictitious
price has been created. The farmers
are not beneficiaries of such condl
tiuns. They will naturally plant mor
wheat and next year's crop Is likely
to be abnormally large, when the gam
bkrs will not be in the market and
mischief will be done by the distui'i
ante of the crop system.
"In the corner of 1898, when the
price of wheat was run up to
th« price was depressed the follow!:
year below 80 cents, the result, un
doubtedly, of the upsetting of the
equilibrium of normal supply and de
mand."
To show that a scarcity of wheat in
this country is not the cause of the
present abnormal increase in the
prices Secretary Wilson points out
that the amount of wheat produced in
the calendar year 1908 was 6(i5,00'».
000 bushels, as compared with 634,00 ».
000 bushels for the crop year 19(»7,
making 31,000,000 bushelB more for
the last crop year than was found the
year previous.
CONTINUES TO GO HIGHER
Wheat Advance3 in Price on Chicago
Board of Trade.
Chicago, April 19.—James •. Pat-
tap. loader of the Mar *nd Jul* wheat
i hulls, was r.oi in tin market, 'accord­
ing to his own statement, but prices
advanced nevertheless. July touched
I $1.18%. May closed 1 cent up, at
$1.28%
PRACTICHUYIHWNS STRIKE
Marine Cooks and Stewards Refuse to
Work With Nonunion Men.
Buffalo, N. Y., April 19.—While not
officially declaring a strike J. M.
Secord of this city, general secretary
of the Marine Cooks and Stewards'
union, has instructed his men not to
take employment on any boat on
which there are nonunion crews or
control engineers. The cooks and
btewards are affiliated with the Lake
Seamen's union and it is not believed
that the latter organization can hold
off much longer In declaring the
strike officially. The marine firemen
i have voted a benefit of $3 a week to
men called out on the various boats.
The police have been called on sev
eral times to disperse crowds throw
fhg coal at passing boats manned with
nonunion crews.
SEVEN-YEAR-OLD HEROINE
Michigan Girl Rescues
Baby
Federal Judge Assumes Exclu
sive Control ol Rate Cases.
Kansas City, April 19.—Judge Smith
McPherson, in an amended decree
handed down In the United States dis
trict court here, reserved exclusive
jurisdiction in Missouri's rate cases
and In effect instructed the state
courts to keep out of the case. The
decree will dissolve the injunction
against the railroads now ponding in
the state courts and started by the
state officials to enjoin the eighteen
railroads operating In the state from
putting the 3-cent passenger rate Into
efTect.
"This latest decree," said Frank
Hagerman, representing the Missouri
railroads, "means that the federal
court retains absolute control of the
rate situation in Missouri. It will pre-1
vmt any nnur" intet terence on the
uart ol tin stat" emirts."
J1L0 GOLDEN
COFFEE
What is your ideal of excel
lent coffee Don't you like a
mild yet exhilarating aroma—a
coffee that settles quickly and
pours clear—full-flavored, rich,
satisfying, sustaining?
Then you're a sure believer
in OLD GOLDEN goodness
—it's a coffee of special blend,
scientifically matured, balanced
and roasted.
It will please you—it pleases
everybody. Get
it from
grocer.
At the Opera House, for Men Only 8 o'clock
TO-NIGHT
PROF. WEGNER WILL SING
Brother
From Burning Home.
Plymouth, Mich, April 19.—Seven
year-old Zaida White saved the life of
her two-year-old brother by carrying
him out of their burning home. The
barking of the dog awakened the fam
ily and the house was discovered to
be in flames. In the confusion the
baby sleeping In an upstairs room was
overlooked when the family reached
out doors. Zaida discovered that he
was missing and darted back upstairs.
She returned safely down the biasing
staircase with the little fellow in her
arms.
TELLS STATE COURTS
TO KEEP HANDS OFF
See
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
CORRECT A STYltS FROM THE
MOST RELIABLE MANUfACUTRtKS
McKIBBIN $3 MATS
The best value on earth
for the money.
Monarch and Cluett
$1 and $1.50 Shirts
beautiful, new patterns
strictly fast color. Nothing
better.
"Vogue" Neckwear, Hos
iery and Suspenders. The
most Extravagant line of
goods in the market at
popular prices.
fOOT SCIMZE and ENDICOTT
JOHNSON SHOES and OXfORDS
Every shade and style imaginable
$3 to $5 values. Guaranteed to
give satisfaction.
i.^iiuiaMiH
LOOK AT THESE
C0LAPSABLE BABY CARTS
My
A failing tiny nerve,-no larger than I
the finest silken thread, takes from the
heart its impulo, its power, its regu
larity. The stomach also has its hidden
or inside nerve. It was Dr. 8ho:p who
first told us it was wrong to drug a weak
or failing stomach, heart or kidneys.:
His prescription—-Dr. Shoop's Restore- I
five—is directed straight for the cause
of these aiimunts, these weak and falter
ing inside nerves. This no doubt ex
plains why the Restorative has of late
grown so rapidly in popularity. Drug
gists say that those who test the Restor
ative even for a few days soon become I
fully convinced of its wonderful merit,
Anyway, don't drug the organ. Treat
ing the cause of sickness is the only
aensibleard successful way. Sold by
Chris Sohuti,
'jo.
The best on the market
They must be se$n to
be appreciated.
We have an elegant
line el
Rugs,
Art Squares,
Lace Curtains
Handsome Leather
Upholstered Rockers
Line and Get Prices
E O E K
A RELIGIOUS AUTHOR'S feTATE
MENT
R»v. Joseph H. Fesperman, Salisbury,
A7. C., who is the author of several books
writes "For several years I was afflicted
with kidney tiou'ule and last winter 1
was suddenly stricken with a severe
pain in my kidneys ard was confined to
be^ eight ys unable to get up without
assistance. My urine contained a thick
white sediment and I passed same
frequently uay and night. I commenced
taking Foley's Kidney Remedy, and the
pain gradually abated and finally
ceased and my urine became normal. I
cheerfully recommend Foley's Kidney
Remedy.''—J. H. Atderson.
MEttHONRNHB
Jr«. v
-i, E/4j.
I ,f A*.

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