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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, May 05, 1909, Image 4

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-05-05/ed-1/seq-4/

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TO RECOMMEND
CHANCE IN LAW
fosifeflt Hopes to Remedy
Commodities Clause.
"V .'• V
CABINET DISCUSSES
Announced That Mr. Tall Intends to
•••4
D*vot« Mush Time Thia Summer to
,/i a Study of the Question of Corpora
Hon Control, the Recent 8uprerre
?«•',* Court Oecieton Having a Bearing on
1
tha Investigation.'
WaaMngton, May 4,-*»Tl*e decision
•f the supreme court of the Unite*!
States in the case of the "commodities
•lause" of the Hepburn railroad rate
tew was discussed at the cabinet
Sieeting. President Taft repeatedly
lu announced that he intends to take
*p and study the question of the con
'|rol of corporations during the sum-
Bier months and the "commodities
Slause" decision undoubtedly will have
distinct bearing on his considers
Hon of the matter, ft was said that
Iff. Taft will devote himself largely
lk the subject of recommending
Songress the passage of legislation
WKich will prevent the possibility rl
Sa evasion of the clause by the coa
railroads.
Under the decision of the court the
Railroads can carry coal for any com
which they do not own outright
SfafOVgh holding companies, however
oould control the mines and the
transportation of the output as though
So law on the subject existed. To
YMMdjr the act in this respect will he
fhe question to which the president
frill first direct his inquiry.
Mr. Taft also will have recommen
dations to make as to legislation tend
fat to bring railroads and other cor
foratlons more definitely under gov
Srnment regulations.
AGED MOTHER ON THE STIRD
lire. of
Halne Testifies at the
I Under cross-examination by Mr. De
tnu
Mr
a. Halns broke down com
Irately and had to be excused from
tb* witness stand. She was led Fob
Sing from the courtroom as Justice
ordered a short recess.
VIOLATWN
OF
LAW
v*
,jj*, «?.'"
4
:f
Trial
Her Son.
Plashing, I* I., May i—Mi*. Vtr
%fnla Halns, mother of Captain P. C.
jkains, on trial for the murder of W.
|L Annls, was called to testify. She
appeared quite feeble and Major
thrins, her son, assisted her to the
irltneaa stand. Mrs. Hains glanced
St Captain Ilatns as she passed by
in the courtroom, but there was
sign of recognition on the defend
Snt's face. Mrs. Halns' hair is al
Stoat white. She spoke distinctly, but
Appeared a little nervous when sh
lagan her testimony. Mr. Mclntyr
iaked her about her own early life
Snd the time of Captain llalns' birth.
Mrs. Halns said she had been sub
Ibct to dizzy spells for several yewrs
previous to her son's birth. She told
feow Captain Halns suffered from
Nightmares when he was two and
Vhree years old. He would spring up
•I bed and cry out. she said, and it
ipsa difficult to restrain him.
i Mrs. Halns related the story of the
JJfecldoat when her son, at the age of
tine years, fell down the hatchway of
tfce llgMftwee tender Pharos. She
Said thia fall had a very serious effect
IN that her son suffered from severe
Mrrou* headaches for a long time
#terward.
ALLEGED
inig«r af Socialist Paper o«# Ti^ll
In Federal Court.
Fort Scott, Kan., May 5.—The trial
the Ap
paper at
flRratll, Kan., charged with violating
the ptfbtal laws, began In the federal
«purt here. Ex-Governor Taylor of
Kentucky is here and will appear as
ft witneaa for the prosecution.
Port Scott, Kan.. May 5.—T
i Fred Warren, manager of
paalfo Reason, a Socialist
The government charges Warren
iMth having transgressed the postal
|t«a fat sending his newspaper
thronth the malts in envelopes on
#hich was printed fn large red letters
aia
oif*r of $1,000 reward for any pev
attn who would return Governor Tar
tar to Kentucky to stnnd trial for the
alleged murder of Governor Onobel.
Tfcla offer, it is stated, was suggested
fey the taking of Moyer and Haywood
Untm Denver to Idaho to be tried on a
eftarge of murdering Governor Steun-
Tragedy Follows Komancek
Naw York, May 5.—As the tmgie
SMniteatlem of a romance begun on
Shipboard two years ago, when both
infer* ateerage paaaengers on the way
t# America from the same village in
mnt
Mendel Woinatock, twenty-
years old, a journeyman tailor of
Haven, shot and killed Route
sixteen yeara old, and com ml t
suicide. She had refused t»
9*
1
him.
PawHs Atraaa to Reforms.
Fetarabui-g, May 6.—Special dls
raMivad here from Teheran
KMst the shah of Persia has ac-
%ai*e
& lots'
4t tha
ON THE TARIFF'S TRAIL
Views of Women on Alleged Dis
crimination Against Them.
T/Ot
CASE
THE FRIVOLOUS, SAYS ONE
Proposed Incrcas* on Hats, Stockings,
Qlovos and tho Liks Rssontcd In
Torms Not to Bo Mistaksn—MHard
Enough Now to Dross Properly,"
Claims Milwaukee Woman.
From many points In the United
State* since the publication of the
Payne tariff bill have arisen cries from
the women ou what they claim Is the
discrimination ngainst them. It ap
pears to them that the revenue needed
to overcome the threatened big deficit
In the national treasury must come out
of their poeketbooks in the Increased
tariff ou hats, gloves, stockings and
other articles of necessity, together
with higher priced tea and cocoa.
Some of the indignation follows:
Wants tho Frivolous Taxod.
Miss Florence Sanvllle, secretary of
the Consumers' league, In Philadel
phia, said: "If the increased tariff
causes the poor working woman to
have but half a pound of tea where
her slender Income now allows her a
pound, it Is surely all wrong. And
stocklugs for her little ones too! There
certainly never have been too many
pairs of stockings In the homes of the
poor. If the frivolous ones want Paris
creations let thetn be the ones to pay
for them. A womau who can pay $10
for a willow plume might as well pay
$11. Those are the ones to aid In
making up treasury deficits, not the
women in mills and factories who earn
$5 a week and subsist largely on tea
and cocoa."
At the College club Miss Margaret
Brendllnger, the club'a president, said:
"We are all lu fear and trembling over
our Easter bonnets. They may have
to be homemade."
"It Is Hard Enough New."
Milwaukee women resent payta®1 the
proposed duty on gloves, stockings and
other articles of women's apparel. The
directors of the State Consumers'
league of Wisconsin will memorialize
congress In the matter.
Said Mrs. Julia Kurt?., head of a
Home For Unfortunate Girls: "The
tariff on clothing, as proposed In the
Payne bill, Is not going to affect the
rich, but the poor. The rich womau
will be rather glad than otherwise to
have a higher price on her clothes. It
makes It harder for the poor woman
to approach the rich woman's style
The working girl will be the one hard
est hit. It is hard enough now for her
to clothe herself properly."
"Stockings Cost Too Much Naw."
The clubwomen of the two Kansas
cities have signed petitions to con
gressmen to vote against the Payne
tariff bill unless it Is amended with
respect to stockings and gloves, toys,
chocolate and cocoa. Isaac K. Kiin
brell, former prosecuting attorney,
wrote the petition.
Mrs. Harlan I.. Spangier, president
of the Bancroft club and secretary and
treasurer of the Women's Council of
Clubs, says: "I have figured that my
stockings cost me too much now with
out paying any more. I don't see how
any woman can get along with less
than twenty pairs of stockings a year.
Gloves, too, are a big expense. The
Bancroft club la going to take the
tariff question up at its next regular
meeting. I am sure the club will com
plain against the passing of the bill, as
every woman lu Kansas City should
do."
Mrs. Viola Dale McMurray, athletic
instructor for the Kansas City Wo
man's Athletic club, said: "Congress
men are not going to overlook petitions
signed by women. They know that
married women often control the votes
of their liusbauds, and some unmarried
girls can control two or three votes."
Said Mrs. Welbur L. Bell of the
Athenaeum club aud one of Its ex
presldents: "The clubwomen of Kan
sas City study all public measures, but
they are doubly interested in the tariff
on stockings and gloves because it will
affect every woman, no matter what
her station. The Athenaeum- chub has
425 members, and I'm sure they will
all sign the petition."
"Without aid from the tariff, prices
on women's clothing have been going
up for a long time," Mrs. G. B. Longau,
president of the Parliameutary club,
said. "The proposed tariff would make
It even worse. The women are alive
to the Importance of this bill, and they
will let the legislatures know of their
objections."
Ohio Women After Indian.
Cleveland (O.) clubwoineu &T6 plafl
lilng to Interest Senator Burton in the
fight against the proposed increased
tariff on women's apparel. He is a
bachelor and usually prefers to side
step conferences with the gentler sex,
but be will not be allowed to escape
now.
"We must make It ao uncomfortable
for our congressmen and seuators that
they will join us In our light," said
Mrs. Henry Thompson, a leading club
woman.
"Not only are we opposed to the
advances in the Payne bill, but we
Selleve that the duties on certain of
theae articles should be reduced from
the present rates of the Dlngley tariff."
said another clubwoman, adding. "You
muat not nse my name if you put that
In the paper."
Chlaago Woman
Perala al
Tha Chicago WoBtMifc dab haa da
noamced the hotifrr?, gtotaa and hat
Srtwdalaa of 4tm Agraa Mil, «aS tha
Hi
fL-Jh
Illinois Federation
Jin-,-*
of
Women's Clubs
will protest al the moiling.
Mrs. Harold McCormkk, who Was
Miss Edith Rockefeller, speaking for
the women who cannot afford to pay
the tax, said: "I will write a personal
letter to the ways and means commit
tee protesting against the bill. Any
little Influence of mine is certainly on
the side of those who will have to pay
this undue tax."
Mrs. Lock wood Honore said: "Here
Is a subject on which women are the
experts. They can speak with author
lty, and the whole nation will listen."
Mrs. Collins Reed has written
Senator Cullom: "Though a disfran
chised citizen, I shall feel most severely
the weight of the increased tariff on
stockings and gloves. I think the pro
posed bill Is most Iniquitous, as the
burden Is placed on the backs of those
who already stagger—the poor and the
salaried classes."
"Make It so uncomfortable for your
congressman and our lone senator.
Shelby M. Cullom, that they will do
something," exhorted Mrs. E. M. Hen
derson the other day to the League of
Cook County Clubs.
Mrs. Charles Ilenrotln said: "I think
the women should certainly take up
the unreasonable tariff on hosiery and
gloves. We shall try to take action at
this biggest of all of our suffcajflst as
aembllea."
Appeal* to Spin staff.
A protest against the duty on tea Is
raised by Katherlne Howard of Balti
more, but only on the ground of dis
crimination against her sex.
"In the new tariff bill," she says,
"beer and whisky are not going to be
touched, coffee Is on the free list, but
tea- that solace of the spinster lady—Is
to be taxed 8 aud 9 cents a pound. It
is time for the unmarried women of
the country to protest. Tea is dis
tinctly a feminine beverage, while the
bachelor gentleman Is addicted to the
use of beer and whisky—In fact, be has
often been susiiected of preferring It to
matrimony. Therefore everybody will
agree that It Is a wicked discrimina
tion to pass lightly over these bever
ages and place the whole expense upon
tea."
HUMPHREY AT WHITE HOUSE
Juriaft Criticised by Roosevelt Calla on
Taft.
Washington, May P.—Judge J. Otis
Humphrey of the Southern district of
Illinois, who save the decision that
meant Immunity for the alleged beef
trust, is not persona non grata at the
White House these days. A few
months ago he would not have ven
tured across Its portals, but now he
fearlessly entered the president's
aillce and got a friendly reception
S
JUDGE HUMPHREY.
from Mr. Taft, who greeted him with
the salutation: "I have heard of you
before, Judge.
Mr. Taft had reference to the mes
sage sent to congress by his prede
cessor urging the passage of a bill
giving the government the right of
appeal in criminal cases, in which Mr.
Roosevelt unreservedly expressed his
opinion of Judge Humphrey, along
with other federal judges, mentioned
by name, whose decisions In cases in
which the government was tataraatad
did not meet his approval.
MAIN HEARS HIGH"
I PRICE OF SEASON
". yk
wnear
tot
may aim
joiy ubuy-
,, lty 6oing Upward.
Chicago, May 5.—July wheat on the
fcoard of trade made a sensationally
bullish showing, advancing from 11.12,
the low point of the day, to $1.16, at
which the market closed. This marked
a net advance of 3% cents. May
closed at $1.28. The market has been
advancing steadily for the last week,
following the spectacular decline
which set afloat reports that James
A. Patten had dropped out of the mar
ket. The day's high prices were 1%
cants under the best price of the bull
campaign for May and only
t%
The day's advance, on top of the
gradual gains of laat week, Is said to
Indicate clearly that the bull cam
paign, which was alleged In many
quarter* to be dead, waa only aleep
lat.
The closing figures were 10 cents
higher than the bottom reached on
April 2? mat.
Flooded by Subterranean Lake.
Silver l^ake, Ind., May 5.-—Three
miles Southeast of this city a subter
ranean lake has burst lis confines and
has submerged the highway to a
depth of twenty feet and lor a lis
tance of more than 100 yardf.
Ten Persons Sustain injuries.
Dayton, O., May 5.—Tea persons
were injured, a number of them seri
ously, by the turning over of a car ou
the Dayton and Northern Traction
llue lu this city.
tiktch Defeat* Pelmaft*
Des Moines, la., May 5.—Before 5,
000 people, the largest crowd that
ever attended a wrestling match in
Iowa, Frank Gotch, world's champion
heavyweight wrestler, defeated Jesse
Reimer of Dea Mokies In two straight
falls, 18% and 15 minutes, reapec-
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICES
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, May 4—Wheat—May.
$1.27% July, Sept.. $1.09^.
On track—No. 1 hard, $1.30
1.30% No. 1 Northern, $1.29%
1.29% No. S Northern, $1.27%^
1.27% No. S Northern, $1.24%^
1-26%.
St. Paul Union 8tock Yards.
8t. Paul, May 4.—Cattle—Good to
choice steers, $4.50£i5.00 fair to good,,
$4.505.00 good to choice cows and
heifers. $4.00(7ia.00 veals, $5.00(i5.7•".
Hog3—?fi.*5®7.05. Sheep—Wetht rs,
$r .'.Off 5.90. yearlings, [email protected]
lambs, $7.00^7.50.
Dttluth Wheat and Pfegfet
DulutTi, May 4.—Wheat—To arrive
and on track—N'o. 1 hard, $1.30^ No.
1 Northern, $1.29 No. 2 Northt.n,
$1.27 May, $1.26^ July, $1.261i
Sept., $1.09%. Flax—To arrive and
on track, $1.68 May, $1.67 July, $1
67 Sept.. $1.44% Oct., $1.31.
Chicago Grain and Provfefone.
Chicago, May 4.—Wheat May,
$1.28 July, $1.16 Sept., $1.05% Dec.,
$!.03%. Corn—May, 71%c July, «K74
?T69c Sept., 67%c, Dec., 58%c.
Thomas Simpson, carpenter, Pipe
stone avenue. Flandreau, B. D.( says:
"I suffered from disordered kidneys for
a great many years and nsed most
every remedy I learned of without
finding relief. The doctors were un
able to ntilp me and my case became
very Berions. My back pained me in
cessantly and I arose in the morning
languid and tired. Having read of
Doan's Kidney Pills, I decided to try
them and procured a box. From tne
first I observed a decided change and in
a very abort time my trouble bad en
tirely disappeared. It is a great plea
sure to recommend tbia excellent pre
paration.
For sale by all dealers. Price 50
cents. Foster-Milbnrn Co., Buffalo,
New Yoik, tole agents for the United
States.
Remember tha name—Doaa'a~ and
take no other.
i
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
President1^
•x.-fVJ
*i'V
iV *f
cents
below the July record.
Bartlett, Patten ft Co., of which the
bull leader, JarccE A. Patten, Is a
member, were credited with selling
May on a moderate scale, but with
making heavy purchases of July.
"(5- i'H
a-
4
1 -v fi i* v a*'
ifeir,.
LAND IS
ALL
Home in
where
f%f!i '§r»n
Oats
-May, F.6»[email protected]%c July, 497* c.
Sept., 42%c Dec., 43^°. Pork—May,
$17.77'4 July. $18.00 Sept., $17.97
Butter—Creameries, [email protected] dairies.
1914f'24»4c. Eggs—21^ 22c. Poultry
Turkeys, 17c chickens, 15c
springs, 15c.
Chicago Union Steak VarSs
Chicago, May 4.—Cattle—Bonres.
$5.00(T/ 7.15 Texas stoers. $4.60®5.7"«
Western steers, $1.70fa i.75 stockers
and feeders. $3.60 cows and
heifers, [email protected]: calves, $5.5e?7
7.5C. Ilogi-—14a Lt, $n 8"yi!7.30 mixed,
$7.00' 7.40 heavy. $7.00(ff7.45 roufrh
S7.f0(f» 7.1." got'd to choice hea\v,
$7.T,«. 7.45 Pl£*. $ 75?i 6.75. Sheep
—Native, SU.SOifr 6.2u: yearlings, $( .25
@7.25 lambs, $6.00(?(.8.75.
FAIR EXCHANGE
A New Back for an Oki One
How it Can be Dons In
Madiaon
The backaches at times with a dull,
indescribable feeling, making you
wearj* and restless piercing pains shoot
across the region of the kidneys, and
again the loins are so lame to stoop is
agony. No use to rub or apply a plas
ter to the back in this condition. Yon
cannjt reach the cause. Exchange the
bad back for a new and stronger one.
If
GATARft
Ely'8 Cream Balm
•ura to Qlva Satlafaction.
OlVIS RBUIP AT ONCI.
ft eleanses, soothes, heals and protects tb«
diseased membrane resulting from Catarrh
»nd drives away a Cold in the Head quickly.
Restores the Senses of Taste and Smell.
Easy to use. Contains no injurious drugs
Applied Into the nostrils and absorbed.
LarK'e Size, SO cents at Druggists or by
mail. Liquid Cream Bala for use is
atomizers, 75 cents.
fLY 66 Warraw It. Maw Verl
€. KENNEDY,1
Vice Proidant.
THF«
m.'
EARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
..I,
MADISON, S. i vX,
"A
£i?l
'A
andCthe demand for Lake County farms is increasing.
are search of a
a
you can raise Wheat, Oats Barley Coro, Potatoes and in
fact everything adapted to this latitude and wheie
you can successfully carry on
Dairying ot Stock
Raising
and where your family will have the advantages at
GOOD SOCIETY GOOD SCHOOLS
GOOD CHURCH FACILITIES
Then sge me, and I will show *ott lust what ytm want
If you are renting land now, paying $3 to $5 annual
rental, I will show you "just as good land and sell
it to you at what you will pay out in rental
where you are in three ye^rs, and
will give you easy terms ot payment
you want a good location in Madison
•.j:
4-
PHONE 195
rk','.
mm
-.V
I
__ %/./ y V,
BASIS OF
Good Climate
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO.
MILWAUKEE BEER
on draught at
FRED KURTH'S,
y. S. MURPHY.
If you
A
I
^piar^e number ot substantial buildings have been built
in Madison the past season and the civ* is steadily
growing in population.
Correspondence Solicited
Chas. B. Kennedy,
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA.
have such for vou.
PETER HEAGNEY
Prioate stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
at all Leading Saloons in the city*
L. J. AHMANN, Agent.
Peter Marquart & Son
Cement Walks, Foundations,
Bridges, Culverts, anything and
everything in Guaranteed Ce
ment Construction. s
:SEE«
W. G. MARQUART,
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
E W.
Si.'
1
w'f
A
263
KETCHArt
Will^delW promptly to any part of the dtjiu"
_... the beat jrad# ol
HARD AND SOFT COAt
4?1 v 9 1 it r*
-a
a.
1-.
s.

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