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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, May 06, 1909, Image 1

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SOCIALIST STIRS
PEACEGONGRESS
Usual Calm Deliberations
Rudely Disturbed.
FINALLY TURNED D0WN
Introduces Resolution Declaring So
cialism the "Greatest Peace Force
in the World" and Urges Its Adop
tion—Convention Refuses to Thus
Emphasize the Views of Any Fac
tion of Delegates.
Chicago, May —The peaceful de
liberations of the peace congress wero
rudely disturbed when A. M. Simon
of the Chicago Daily Socialist at
tempted to secure formal recognition
of socialism as the "greatest pear
force in the world."
It happened after the congress had
officially adopted a platform in strict
keeping with its well known prin
ciples along broad lines, carefully
avoiding matters of sectional or polit
Ipal controversy.
Mr. Simon arose with 400 words of
"whereases" and "be it resolved,"
outlining socialistic beliefs and ac
complishments and attributing the
causes of war to "the exploitation of
labor and the impoverishment of those
who toil."
Qreat confusion followed. The reg
ular platform had been read and
amidst the turmoil arouBed by the
Simon resolutions there were repeat
ed calls for the original question. On
a viva voce vote the report of the
resolutions committee carried unani
mously. The question then recurred
to the adoption of the socialist reso
lutions.
Secretary Melendy arose to state
that he thought industrial causes of
war should be recognized and like
wise the efforts of those organizations
which make for peace, but he could
not vote for the resolutions as pre
sented. He suggested a substitute
resolution less radically worded.
Ready to Amend Resolutions.
"If there is any way by which this
recognition of which Mr. Melendy
speaks can be secured I am sure that
the socialists and trade unions will be
very glad to make an amendment that
would recognize this fact," Bald Mr.
Simon.
Judge K. O. Brown of the resolu
tions committee declared that the reg
ular platform already adopted seemed
best to embody the varying opinions
of the delegates as a whole without
unduly emphasizing those of any one
faction.
J. E. Iglehart opposed the Simon
revolutions, saying:
"My opinion is that this convention
will lose more or less of its moral
force, especially with the countries
of Europe, if we interject a partisan
view of any question like this into the
record."
This declaration was received with
applause and a motion to lay on the
table was promptly seconded.
The chair called for a viva voce
vote, the result of which in the ensu
ing confusicn seemed to be against
tabling the matter. A second vote
seemed to have the same result and
standing vote was then demanded
This showed a vote of two to one ir
favor of tabling and it was so ordered
J. J. Sultaire of Milwaukee present
ed a resolution deprecating the allur
ing posters used by the army and
navy recruiting departments in seek
ing new material. Tbe resolution
was voted down.
LAKES TO THE GULF CANAL
Ptnsideration of Plan Taken Up in
Mlinois Legislature
Springfield. 111., May 6.—Considera
tion of the deep waterway plans in
committee of the whole began with
the convening of the house.
Congressman Loriroer gave a de*
scriptton of what the federal govern
ment deep waterway plans are and
their application to Illinois. He said
be wished to go on record now as op
posed to spending $1 of the $20,000
000 bond issue for a deep waterway
until the United States government
agrees to join with the state of 111!
nois in the carrying on of the great
work.
"I am confident, he said, "that when
the survey of the government engi
neers is published that it will demon
strate the feasibility of a waterway
trgm the Lakes to the Gulf."
Prominent Elk Ends Uft
Toledo. O., May 6—Delirious from
Illness Captain William Cook, a prom
Inent Elk, a noted drillmaster and
captain of the Elks' Cherry Pickers,
famous drill squad, leaped from
fourth story window and was in
stantly killed. A daughter tried to
prevent her father jumping, but was
5
A.'
GREAT DAY IN MILWAUKEE
"German Athens of America" Enter*
tains the Kaiser's Envoy.
Milwaukee, May 6.—This city, which
lias a larger proportion of citizens of
Gorman birth or descent than any
other In the United States, is outdo
ing itself today in its welcome to
0
COUNT VON BERNSTORFF.
Count Johann Heinrich von Bernstorff.
the German ambassador to this coun
try.
Count von BernstorfT will remain
here two days. He was welcomed to
the city by Mayor Rose and other offi
cials and will be the guest of honor
at a banquet to be given by the Citi
zens' Business league. At the ban
quet he will speak on "Social Reforms
in Germany."
AST DAY'S WORK
OF PEACE CONGRESS
Closing Proceedings of the Chi
cago Gathering,
Chicago, May 4.—An exchange of
formal greetings between the diplo
matic representatives of various na
tions and a business session to con
sider the practical results of the gath
ering of peace envoys constituted the
last day's work of the second national
peace congress in session in this city.
Joseph B. Moore, justice of the su
preme court of Michigan, presided
over the business sessions. Ten-min
ute talks were made by eight dele
gates. Alfred H. Love of Philadel
phia, president of the Universal Peace
union, said in part:
Compulsory peace is an incubator
of war: preparation for war is a
menace of war broken treaties of
peace are peace breakers. It is a
lamentable page in our history this
showing to the world the gigantic,
destructive dreadnaughts, our boasted
instruments of death, causing other
countries to imitate this cowardly,
selfish and unneighborly nationality
that can say on its coin 'In God we
trust' and then In Its intercourse with
others repudiate the psalmist when
he says 'The Lord is our refuge and
our strength.'"
Mrs. Fannie Pern Andrews of Bos
ton, secretary of the American School
Peace league, told of the work of that
organization. Henry C. Niles of York,
Pa., told of his state's experiences in
state peace congresses. Other speak
ers were llev. J. L. Tryon of Boston,
assistant secretary of the American
Peace society, who spoke of "The
London Peace Congress of 1908," and
Rev. Gilbert Bowles of Tokio, Japan.
Congressman Richard Bartholdt of
Missouri presided at the "internation
al greetings" session. The principal
speakers were Count Johaun Hein
rich von Bernstorff, the German am
bassador: Wu Ting Fang, the Chinese
ambassador, and Secretary of the In
terlor Richard A. Balllngsr.
NOW HOLDS BEST RECORD
Roosevelt Bass Two More Big Lions
in Africa.
Nairobi, B. E. A., May 8.—Theodore
Roosevelt went Hon hunting again
and before the chase was over two
more big lions had fallen before his
gnn.
Mr. Roosevelt now holds the record
for Hon killing in the protectorate
Since Saturday of last week a total of
five lions and one lioness have been
feagged by him.
Harrlman a Lake Shore Direstw.
Cleveland, May fi.—K. H. Harrlman
was elected a director of the Lake
Shore and Michigan Southern Rail
road company at the annual meeting
of the stockholders here.
Close Content at Lincoln
Lincoln. Neb., May 6.—The official
count probably will be needed to de
clde the Lincoln mayoralty contest
Don L. Love, Republican, claims elec
tion by a plurality of forty-six, while
Robert Malone, Democrat, says he has
lead of twenty-three. More than
csst la tfcs slMtton. wlvsd la a
v*v,
•s*
•4
^'fit
"a
SITUATION AGAIN
SEEMS CRITICAL
Further Anti-Christian Out
breaks Imminent
NEITHER MONEY NON FOOD
Terrible Famine Threatens the Resl
dents of Hadjin, Where Mission
arles Are Helpless to Render As
sistance—Turkish Troops and i
British Warship Leave Beirut foi
Scene of Trouble.
Beirut, Asiatic Turkey, May 6.—Tht
situation at Suadla and Deurtyul agaii:
is critical. Trouble is brewing and
further anti-Christian outbreaks art
feared. Five hundred Turkish troop*
have been dispatched to those twe
points.
In addition the British battleship
Triumph, with the British consul oc
board, left here for Deurtyul.
Hadjin, May 6.—Hadjin is teeing s
terrible famine. There is nelthei
money nor food in the city. The or
phans that have been cared for bj
the American missionaries are crying
for bread and the missionaries are
anxious that their benevolent friends
be notified of the situation here.
DEPOSITED IN FOREIGN BANK
Deposed Sultan Found to Have Marc
Than $5,000,000.
Constantinople, May 6.—The com
mission which is making an inventory
of the property at the imperial palace
at Yildiz has discovered, according to
the local newspapers, bank notes to
the value of $2,250,000 and a large
quantity of jewelry, including a rosary
alone valued at $375,000. Papers
seized at the palace show that Abdul
Hamid had something over $5,000,000
on deposit in a foreign bank.
Tewfik Pasha has placed his resig
nation as grand vizier in the hands ot
TEWFIK PASHA.
the sultan, but. he has agreed to re
tain the post until after the ceremony
of "girding on the sword," which cor
responds to the coronation in other
countries, and for a few days there
after until the country Is quieter.
This ceremony probably will take
place next Monday.
Hllml Pasha has been appointed
grand vizier and will assume office on
the retirement of Tewfik Pasha.
TO PROCEED AT FULL SPEED
American Cruisers at Gioraltar
Way to Merslna.
Washington, May 6.—Instructions
have been sent to the North Carolina
and Montana, which have arrived at
Gibraltar on their way to Asiatic Tur
key waters to protect American inter
ests, to proceed to Merslna as soon
as the ships have coaled. Captain
William A. Marshall, commanding the
squadron, has been ordered to view
the situation at Merslna and then con
tinue with one or both of the cruisers
to Alexandretta, according to the
needs of the situation existing when
he reaches Merslna. It will take
about two days for the North Carolina
and Montana to take on coal at Gib
raltar and they have been ordered to
proceed at full speed just as soon as
coaling has been completed.
It is probable that they wfl! peach
Merslna about May 12.
Arrested on Anothsr Charge.
Union City, Tenn., May 6.—Pete
and Smith Branham, two of the night
rider defendants now out on ball
awaiting trial, were arrested and
placed in Jail here charged with the
murder of a man named Phillips on
Reelfoot lako late Tuesday afternoon.
It is said that the parties were in
prsvent her father jumping, oui ww lead of twenty-mree. mwe «.!. of a nreacrlptlon by one of his clerks.
mab*e to restrain
you. to
I
ot
.*.N
totw
steadta*
ate
MADISON. SOUTH DAKOTA* THURSDAY, MAY 6, 1909
AFTER RICH LAND OWNERS
7
Object of Black Hand Soc.«ty Organ-
ized in Mexico.
Manzannillo, Mex., May 6.—A Black
Hand society has been formed in this
community, having for its purpose the
extermination of such rich land own
ers or merchants as have Incurred the
enmity of its members. A novel plan
has been evolved and when the death
of such a wealthy person Is decided
on a basket of lemons is brought
forth In secret conclave and all the
members draw one. Finally a marked
lemon falls to the lot of the pros
pective slayer and the yellow fruit Is
sent to the prospective victim. Then
he dies.
Commissario Politico Nicasia Gon
sales of the town of San JoBe del Gon
zales is the first victim and his as
sassin was Juan Chaearria, who has
been imprisoned.
IS WORRYING STEAM ROADS
Competition of Electric Lines foi
Freight Business.
Chicago, May 6.—Western and East
ern railroads are alarmed over the
prospects of competition for freight
business on the part of the electric
railroads. The announcement that
the Eastern Illinois and the Rock Isl
and system would interchange freight
traffic with the Illinois traction sys
tern has made the problem of electric
line competition one of the most
pressing of traffic problems.
Within a few days there will be a
conference of traffic officials of Chi
cago roads to decide whether it would
be wise to follow the example of the
Eastern Illinois.
-JIL.
EMPLOYE OF SUGAR
TRUST ARRESTED
fiovernment After Men Who
Manipulated Scalps.
New York, May 6.—Criminal pro
ceedings as an outgrowth of the gov
ernment's suit against the American
Sugar Refining company, which re
suited in disclosures of wholesale un
ci erwelghlng of sugar fin ports, have
been begun by the federal authorities
here.
Thomas Kehoe, for many years a
checker on the docks of the company
in Brooklyn, was placed under arrest
charged with being one of the men
who took part in fraudulent manip
ulation of the scales as a result ot
which the American Sugar Refining
company recently paid to the govern
ment $2,134,000 In back duties.
Kehoe pleaded not guilty when ar
raigned, waived examination and gave
bail for bis appearance on May 12 be
fore the United States court in Man
hattan.
Kehoe is the man who, according
to government witnesses in the sugar
suit, was caught in November, 1907,
actually using a fraudulent spring on
the scales of the sugar company in
Brooklyn.
SIX MEXICANS DIE IN FIGHT
Young American .Held on Charge of
Murder.
Vera Crux, Mex., May 6.—Harold
Sanborn, son of President Sanborn of
the Junta Plantation company and
the Sanborn Lumber company, is in
jail and six Mexicans are dead as the
result of a clash between young San
born and the owner of the La Tlenda
plantation on the one side and a num
ber of Mexicans on the other.
Vicente Espinosa, a prominent cat
tleman, and one woman are among
the dead.
Both President Sanborn and hi^soa
are Chicagoans.
NEW RECORD FOR SEASON
May Wheat at Chicago Advances to
»1.29'/2.
Chicago, May 6.—May wheat ad
vanced to $1.29%, a new high record
price, shortly after the opening of
business on the board of trade. July
rose 1 cent, to $1.17. Dry weather in
Kansas and Nebraska were the new
bullish Influences.
Wright Brothers Salt for Heflfft
London, May 6.—Wilbur and Or
ville Wright journeyed down to South
ampton and embarked on board the
steamer Kronprinzessln Cecelie for
New York. A large gathering of mem
bers of the Aero club bade the Amer*
ican aviators farewell from London
Orville Wright said he and his brother
Were going home to conduct further
experiments of a secret nature.
Voice of Actress Worth $5,000.
Chicago, May 6.—A jury awarded
(5,000 to Miss Grace Reals an ao
tress, who sued A. W. Adamick, 4
druggist, for $25,000 because, she a!'
leged, her vocal chordi had been In
jured through a mistake iu the filling
V,"
Session May Extend to July 1.
T„ i Washington, May 6.—President Taft
has come t0 the ooneiUSion
0f
as a re
talks with senators and mem-
bers of the house of representative
during the past two days that then'
is little or no chance for an adjourn
ment of congress before June IS »i
July 1.
9
Deafuens Cannot be Cured
by local applii ations, is 'hey cannot
reach the diseased portion of ti e ear.
The re is only one way to cure dmfncHs
and that is by constitutional remedies.
Deafness is caused by an inflamed con
jditionof the mucous lining of tho Eu
Ktachian Tube. When this tube is in
tinmed you have a rumbling sound or
imperfect hearing, and when it is en
tirelv closed, deafness is the result, and
unless the iuflaiuatioo can he taken out
end this tube is restored to its normal
condition, hearing will be destroyed for
ever nine cases out of ten are caused by
Catarrh, which is nothing but an in
flamed condition of the mucous purfaces.
We will give One llundreo Dollars for
any case of deafness (caused by catarrh)
that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh
Cure. Send forcirc lars, free.
F. J. CHENEY «fc LO Toledo, O.
Hold by Druggists, 75.
Take liall's Family Pills for onnstipation
F.-ley's Honey and Tar ie a safeguard
against serious results from spring colds
which inflame the lungs and develop
into pneumonia. Avoid co nterfeits by
insisting upon having the genuine Foi
ey's Hone and Tar, which contains no
harmful drugs.—J. II. Anderso.
People past middle life usually have
some kidney or bladder disord that
sa the vitality, which is naturally
lower in old age. Foley's Kidney Rem
edy corrects urinary troubles, stimulates
the kidneys, and restores strength and
vigor, ll cured uric acid troubles by
-^rcLig!hening the kidneys so they will
strain out the uric acid that sett'es in
the muscles and joints causing rheum
aticm.—J. H. Anderson.
If you have backache and urinary
troubles you should take Foley's Kidney
Remedy to strengthen and build up the
kidney s so they will ac properly, as a
s* rious kidney trouble may develop- .I.
H. Anderson.
THOMPSON & LEE,
Practical Electricians
—Keep on Hand—
Electrical Supplies
Wiring and other Elec
trical Work Done on short
Notice..
SHOP IN IRELAND BUILDING
MADISON CEMENT CO.
J. S. Thompson & Son, Prop.
Sidewalk Workers and
all Kinds of Cement Work
Phone Red-450
Miss Grinager
Fashionable Milliner
Myjnew Spring Stock
lus arrived and I will
be pleased to have th|
ladies call ik Uf
sped it.
MISS GRINAGER
DR. C, O. ESTREM,
Kiysiciaa and
OfFia PNOME 293
JgOUSE ntONf, Cram 43»
Offkt ever Tke Bif Store MADISON. S. DAK
0R. H. P. GULSTINE,
I ...DWTIST.m
pmnc
OffkxswrTteBfe Stars MADISON. S. DAI
•mM
'V-
1
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COMING SOON!
CAMPBELL BRO'S
Great Consolidated
SHOWS
CIRCUS
HIPPODROME
,-'fi fry
'r-, /*, -v
&
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ftfUSEUM
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
MENAGERIE
CORRECT STYLES FROM THE
|0ST RELIABLE MANUEACUTRERS
McKIBBIN $3 HATS
The best value on earth
for the money.
Monarch and Cluett
$1 and $1.50 Shirts
beautiful, new patterns
strictly fast color. Nothing
better. .'
"Vogue" Neckwear, Hos
iery and Suspenders. The
most Extravagant line of
jgoods in the market at
Jpopular prices.
FOOT SCHUIZE and ENDIC0TT
JOHNSON SHOES and OXFORDS
jEvery shade and style imaginable
$3 to $5 values. Guaranteed to
rive satisfaction.
LOOK AT THESE
C01APSABLE BABY CARTS
The best on the market
They must be seea
be appreciated.
We have an elegant
line if
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Rugs,
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See My Line and Get Prices
E O E K
.1
Art Squares,
Lace Curtains
Handsome Leather
Upholstered Rsckers
1
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A
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