OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, May 07, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-05-07/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

n'
i
11'
si
V
if
*&•*£-
.-4.'
^.,
f-'
*v/
s'V
t-
*s
.j§P§i
-j»-
4 v
J?, x»
'.*«
5^,
•**/N ,.,
KMt-
?L
s
•.
Lt-
.«*
h-'
r.V|
K-.
'-v.,
v
0'
k
&
m"
The Big Store.....
SSSSSM
DAKOTA.
TELEPHONE, NO. 269.
FRIDAY. MAY 7. 1909
IS OM IDSSdSiniOll.
*T Mil.l fdr ...» 14.00
By
Mil, antki t.00
BjrMil,•amlki
too
By mall, 1 a
oath
SfMfrtorpw wMk 10
J. f. 8TAHL PtovrtMot.
H. 1. STABL. tuliM) M»n»c*r.
STATE NEWS
Herre—Joe Wiogfield, private secro*
tsry of the governor, is receiving coo'
gratalatioog today A new boy, ra
costly arrived in the secretary's home.
Is the cance.
Wagner—A team of horses owned
by Aagoat Doken, neat here, took'part
la a remaikable runaway a few days
ago, aa a result of which a neighbor
lost sixty rods of strong wire fence.
The team was hiched to a wagon and
was going at top speed when it struck
the fence at the corner of Mr. Stoke«
bory's farm. The corner poet went
under the wagon, thns patting one
horae on eaah side of the fence. The
horses ran on for sixty rods, gather
ing fence aa they went.until the load
attached to the wagon became too
heavy for them to move. Doken fonnd
sixty tods of fence, wagon acd horses
all bunched when be came up to them.
Pollock—Crossing a bridge a mile
east of here at a speed of twenty-five
miles an hour an automobile owned
by T. Tinholt of Herreid and occupied
by him and Frank Alexander of Mound
City suddenly swerved and crashed
down a seven-foot embankment. Tbe
machine turned half a somersanit.
landing sauarely on its top, with the
two men underneath. Though it was
only by a miracle the two men could
com® out of the accident alive,Tinholt
escaped with three broken ribs and
Alexander with a sprained knee and a
bad injnty in the side. An internal
hemorrhage threatened Alexander for
a time but it is believed now hs wi 11
recover.
Pierre—Governor Veesey and his pri
vate secretary, who have been spend
ing a week st the Cheyenne Agency
visiting the governor's eon, returned
last night. The governor reports the
discovery of a crew of ^surveyors at
y-
r,t'y
A Large Exhibit of the Newest Caster Styles are here.
The moat Favored Styles, and .Prices Conspicuously Low.
Never have Women's Tailored Suit* been sopopular as this season, and
never were styles prettier or more varied. The materials are especially
beautiful. Plain and novelties are the most prominent, and the new
satin finished Prunellas are the most conspicuous in tne better SuitB.
Prism isags from
$12 to $35 a Suit
%e afe alio sffowthg an Immense assortment of Skirts, Waists, Muslin
V Underwear, Dress Goods, Wash Goods, Embroideries, Laces and
New Style Corsets
Our stock of Art Squares, Rugs, Carpets, Mattings, Linoleums, Floor OB
Cloths, Lace Curtains, Window Shades and I Iphnls trying Goods is vary
complete, and we invite your inspection.
SIDEWALKS,^"0"5
All Work Guaranteed
«. w. rronpSOK. Brookings Cement Co.
"A JAPANESE GIRL" and
"A CUP OFSAKP
AT THE
Normal Auditorium
FRIDAY, MAY 7th
Catchy Songs, Brilliant Costumes, Effective Drills,
Stunning Dances, Geisha Girls, Strong: Soloists
Reserve Tickets at Jones' Drug Store, 35c. General Admission Tickets
at afl Drug Stores, 25c
®Jje $aU# &eaoct
MAOitoa, loum
J. A. JOHNSON
work on Virgin creek. No informa
tion con Id be extracted from the crew
and there is no little cariosity aroused
and speculations m»de by people here
who are anxious for the time when
more than one railroad will pass
through this city. Since the Northe-n
Pacific people have recently let a con
tract for 150 miles of track from Man
dan, N. D., south and since the party
of surveyors is staking lines north from
Virgin creek.it may be the crew is
making the survey for the Northern
Pacific.
Hionx Falls—Sioux Falls and vicin
ity is not a welcoming resort foi clair
voyants, gypsies, or any class of for
tune-toilets. Chief John A. Grose of
the police department herded a span
gled band of Gypsy queens up the
street to their wagons yestereday, and
ordered the gypsy loids and masters,
who were engaged in tne gentle art of
horse-trading, out of the city with
them. Minnesota has passed a law
which provides prohibitive licenses for
clairvoyants and fortune-tellers, and
since the towns of that state have
been taking advantage of it to paw
ordinances, the readers of tne future
have been heiding across the state
line into the Dakotas,
Pierre—A call lor outstanding war
rants up to the nnmber 20.255 has been
made by the state treasurer for May 7.
This will leave only |57,000 in the out
standing legistered warrant land, and
will reduce the net floating debt to
1557,000.
DeFmet—Elaborate preparations are
being made for the annual celebration
of the Old Settlers' association, which
will be held at this place on June 10.
These gatherings have been held each
year for a number of years pa«t, and
each celebration always is more inter
esting and moie largely attended than
its predecessor.
^Aberdeen-Fire last night destroyed
the elevator, two grain warehouses
and implement warehouse and a hay
barn, and horse barn owned by the
Freeman Bain company. The total lias
is |60,000, with insurance of $10,000.
A high wind prevailed at the time.
The fire-proof station of the Great
Northern, between the burning build
ing and numerous frame buildings,was
all that saved the town from the most
die
sastrous file in
it§
history,
\.
4
m.*
WEEPS FOR HA
Bride Wouldn't Tie His Tie or
Peel His Orange
Went Home.
New York, May 5.— "I want my
mother! (Hobs.) I want to go home
to my mother! (More sobe.) I don't
want to be married any more!" (Sobs
long and loud.) It was not the young
bride, but the bridegroom, Frederick
Gronbaldt of Bnswx street, Jersey
City, who thus called for his mother
as if bis 21 year old heart would
break, sixteen days after hi* mHiring
And now he can be with his mother
all the time, for yesterday Charles
Hughes, the special master to whom
the case had l»een referred, recommend
ed to the chancery court at Trenton
that his wife, Eugenie Gronbaldt, be
granted a divorce on the ground of de
sertion.
The Gronbaldts were married at St,
Paul's church, Jersey City. Inside of
Ihree weeks the bridegroom juet had to
no home and have his mother tie his
tie for bim the way it should be tied
H"d as only a mother can tie it. He
staved at home foi some time, and
when nis bride went to coax him
back her mother-in-law slammed the
door in her face.
But Freddie was s good boy and
meant to do right, so the next day he
bade bis mother a tearful goodby and
went back to bis wife. But in a few
lays his eyes were red with weeping
again and he went a second time to
mother. This happened off and on for
eight months, and then Freddy went
home for good. That was in Decem
ber. Then the bride sued for ber
separation. There are no children.
Nobody could convinco Freddy Gron
baldt now that the hand that nad
rocked bis cradle was not the hand to
tie his ties and put the mostaid in the
foot bath when he had a dreadful cold
in the head.
But once Freddy was headstrong.
He wsnted to be married, and thought
he could get along all right without
bis mother. Ob, how many boys tnere
are in the world who think they can
cot loose from mother the way FTeddy
Gronbaldt thought he could! How
many boys there are who are afraid of
the taunts of coarse companions about
their mothers' apron strings! Freddv
Gronbaldt was like that once. But
not now. He has shed his hitter
tears he has known what it is not to
have a mother's flap-jacks on a cold
winter morning, but now the wanderer
has returned.
His cruel awakening came on the
very first morning after leaving home.
It was at the breakfast table. How
well he remembers it! They had
oranges for breakfast. The bride eat
opposite in her new pink morning
wrapper peeling her orange and smil
ing at him. He waited and waited,
bat finally could stand it no longer,
and in a voice choked with sobs and
disappointment asked if she wasn't go
ing to peel and quarter hia orange for
him just as his mother bad always
done.
Of course she did it, and was sorry
she hadn't thought of it herself. Bat
in spite of the bride's contrition Freddy
begsn to have his eyes opened. He
might have got over that first grief
and disappintment had not others fol
lowed thick and fast.
They were invited to a party,
freddy laced his own shoes without
complaining and tried to put on a brave
face and not spoil the evening foi his
bride, although the pleasure was ad
taken out of it for him by her neglect.
But when she confessed that she did
not know how to tie his new four-in
hand for him he couldn't restrain
himself any longer. Tne tears would
come «nd Freddy ciied so herd that it
made bis head ache, and be couldn't
go to the party at all, although there
weie a lot of nice young folks there
whom ha kniw anil »sn»a^ hn »Uk
BIG LAWSUIT
Former Owners of Stock in
Mine Want to Recofwr
Holdings
Huron,May 6.—Monday, Judge Tay
lor, in chambers.heard an argument on
a demurrer in the action brought by
Henry O. Anderson against the Hcan
dia Mining Hyndicate, concerning the
sale of 1,250,000 shares of stock of the
syndicate to Ole Brown, of Minneppo
lis, who with A. 3. Spate and G. J.
Johnson, of Denver, were the chief
share holders, the latter gentlemen
having 05,000 shares each. The claim
is made that the amount paid for the
stock was not equal to its value. The
syndicate owned properties at Nome,
Alaska, which at the time of the sale
were claimed to be of little value
Later il developed that the mines were
worth from fW,000.000 to flO,000,000
and upon this showing, those who part
ed with their stock,now desire to get
posst'88ion ot it again or to be permit
ted to share in the profits of the syn
dicate. Some weeks since, argument
was had before Judge Taylor and per
mission wa« granted for the plaintiffs
to amend their complaint and it was
upon this that the matter was oronght
before Jadge Taylor Monday. The
plaintiffs were represented by Charles
B. Stafford, of the firm of Tubnuan,
Stafford «1 Co. of Chicago, and A. A.
Chauioerlain, of Huron, the defendant
was represented by C. M. Booth, of
Chicago, and Gardner, Fairbank &
Churchill, of this city. While the
syndicate was really organized in
Chicago.it was incorporated under the
law of South Dakota, with offices in
Huron. Judge Taylor's decigtoa Will
not be given till a later date.
HIGH PRICE
Redfleld, May
4
Sales
For School Lands—Recent
in Spink County
0.—Col. 8.
H. Gray.
acting as deputy commissioner of
school and public lands, and charged
with the sale of school lands in Spink
county, has just closed one of the
most successful sales ever conducted
in the state. The lands met a ready
sale, farmers being in attendance
from all parts of the countv. The
lowest price received was f85 per acre,
and the highest price was $90 per acre.
This brings the average at abont
per acre. When it is considered that
these school lands are wholly unim
proved and nohing but raw prairie the
general improvement of the state and
county from twenty years ago can
readily be seen. The minimum price
of school lands was fixed by the consti
tution at 10 per acre, bat in this por
tion of the state 't is safe to say that
very little, if any, will be sold at less
than $35 per acre from now on. The
total amount received by Col.Gray at
chis sale, lasting less than two hoars,
was 1148,155. Thia amount will go
to swell the permanent school fund of
the state and will be loaned out at 5
per cent upon improved farm lands, or
invested in municipal and school
bonds. Gray leports this to be the
most successful sale that has been wit
nessed since statehood by all odds.
The people of Kedfield and Spink
county naturally feel elated over the
fine showing. This sale confirms the
faith that South Dakotans have in
the lands of the "Jim" river valley.
Wanted, for cash, Early Ohio seed
jotatoes, 25 to 100 bushels. Call on
Joseph Benkin, Lake County clothing
r-tore.
Miss Bogen's Fine
MILLINERY SHOWING
is now in its full array and the ladies
of Madison and vicinity are cordially
invited to inspect her most beautiful
and great assortment of
Tailored and Dress Hats
WESTERN ROMANCE
Dashing Young Westerner Se
lects Bride From Among
the Claims
Aberdeen, May 6. Yesterday at
Bath the marriage of Fred Jennewein
of Bison and Miss Lena Svarstad,
daughter of Mrs. J. A. Svarstad, took
place.
The weddnig is the culimnation of
an acquaintance formed when Miss
Svarstad went to the new country over
the rivei to take up a claim.
Her party pat up at a ranch house
one night and there the brother of the
woman who lived on the ranch met
the party. The brother was Fred Jen
newein.
Mr. Jennewein is one of the well
known young ranchers of that locality.
He took a prominent part in the Bison
Lemmon county seat tight. When a
contest, was seen to be inevitable.it was
decided by the Bison supporter» to send
a man to Belle Fourche to consult an
attorney. Mr. Jennewein was selected,
as he was thought to be well qualified
in presenting the case. He set out on
the ride of 150 miles on Feb. 8 last, the
day of the big blizzard. The ride was
one of great danger, but Mr. Jenne
wein got through safely. His face was
so badly frozen, that it came off to the
lione. After ne bad performed the
work, which took him to Belle Fourche,
he set out on the return ride. By that
time the wind had changed and the
weather had become warm. This
caused the
HUOW
to melt and the
streams in the route were running so
that the rider and his horse were com
pelled to swim many ol them. When
they reached Moreau, the largest of the
streams, the river was nearly cut of
its banks. He secured a ooat from a
settler living on tne river and stretched
a rope ovei the stream, after which he
pulled the horse across, and they
reached Bison well tired out by the ex
perience.
•tossttMcoatfhsadhssblaiitfi
SEMI-ANNUAL
ROTATION SALE
We have been asked by a good many people why we
have not had our Rotation sale tihs spring and the
reason is that the weather has been so measly we
were not in the mood, but now this elegant weather
has made us think you will be interested and here goes.
TUESDAY, MAY 11
25 %DlSCOUNT on all our Muslin Underwear
WEDNESDAY, MAY 12th
25% DISCOUNT on our entire stock of Wash Goods
THURSDAY, MAY 13th
25% DISCOUNT on our entire stock of Shoes
FRIDAY, MAY 14
on all our Shirt Waists, Wash Dresses and Silk Gowns
SATURDAY, MAY 15
25 Discount on our Stock Laces and Embroideries
No Article will be discounted on any day but the one
advertised.
25% DISCOUNT
E A I
"W
f- i
$'i
v
A specialty is made in middle-aged ladies hats as the extremity but beautiful
of this year's style does not appeal to all modes of hair dressing, and therefore
an extra effort was made to obtain the correct styles for the different hair
e s s i n o n v i n e y o u s e y a i n a
Miss Bogen's Millinery Parlors,
1109 FIFTH ST. .... MADISON. S. D.
WATCHES
AND
JEWELRY
REPAIRING
v
bi?
mistake?
i
Sherwin- William Co.
PAINTS AND VARNISHES
This is one of the oldest Paint Manufacturers
in the U. S., and their products have stood
the test for many years being a supperior
qnality. All paints sold with manufacturer*
guarantee.
We have just the thing in WOOD STAINS
fut up in pint bottles, for finishing interior
Woodwork, fine furniture, etc. Any color to
Imitate any kind of wood. .* .* .*
Little Household Paints
any shade or color in 10c cans, up to fine
Enamels at $5.00 per gallon
Jones Drug Co.,
THE CORNER DRUG STORE
COAL
•PHONE 256
We handle only the
best and deliver to
all parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
Ginder's Continued Story
CASH IS KING
After one month's trial of the cash system
(and the hardest month of the year to in*
augerate new methods along these lines)
we are entirely satisfied with results an«
are confident that the Cash System is ajfe
predated by our customers, none of whon§
will be annoyed with statements (duns) of
collectors no occasion for it, they pay a|
they go and enjoy that contented feeling
at the end of the month that is due to all
who are at peace with the butcher. Try
the Ginder Market for a month and b#
convinced that CASH IS KING. No payfa
ing bills twice, no paying the other fellow's
PRESCRIPTIONS
ACCURATELY
COMPOUNDED
COAL
japr account by
GiUfornia Picnic flams
Breakfast Mackerel, salted, each
Salted Salmon, per lb. J*
3 K Herring, per pail V#
THE GINDER MEAT CO.
WHERE CASH IS KING
if
tic
16c
10c
90c
'v.
ti'-y
fe-
6
jjr:
m,.
:v
-V
v """"W
y~j
v,

xml | txt