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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, May 19, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-05-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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SfiMker Protests Against til* Possi
bility of Special Legislation to Le
alize the Boycott and Declares
hat "an Organization That Cannot
mive Unless It Gets License to
Break the Laws Deserves to Die."
Hew York, May 19.—Discussion of
the labor problem was the feature of
the day's session of the convention of
the National Association of Manufac
turers. President Van Cleave of the
association spoke in protest against
the possibility of special legislation
In favor of organised labor, pleading
for consideration of the Bubject on
the grouud that such legislation
would constitute a menace to the
country's welfare.
The coming session of congress
would seem a particularly favorable
time to the labor leaders for the urg
ing of legislation to legalize picketing
JAMES W. VAN CLEAVE,
and the boycott, Mr. Van Cleave de
clared. because both parties would be
particularly anxious to control the
next house.
"Reverses In the middle of a presi
dential term." said the speaker, "us
ually mean that the opposing party
will elect the next president. In all
puch canvasses there is always a pow
erful temptation for the politicians In
both partits to make promises and
concessions to all sorts of elements
with the hope of winning or retaining
•flfss"
Urges Further Precautions.
JK'ym'v.
nf i!i«- National
Of «D sad word* of
I
tongue or pen—The
I saddest are tnese:
W
"It might have been
CALUMET
Baking
Powder
void the mishaps
Avoid tl
•ncntt
I
4 ,r
..
KOYAL
Baking Powder
Absolutely Vur*
The only baking powder made
from Royal Grape Cream of Tartar
—made trom grapes—
Royal Baking Powder conveys to food the most healthful of fruit
properties and renders it superior in flavor and whoiesomeness.
BITTER AGAINST
LABORjiNICNS
Van Cleave Addresses Manu
facturers'
Association.
WOULD CONTINUE FIGHT
Ac- i i U T- »t I' 11 •-1
|'class legislation" Mr. Van Cleave
urged necessity of further precau
tions. "Financial confidence is reviv
ing and there is an improvement in
most of the important lines of trade,'
he said. "Unwise labor legislation,
however, could quickly check this
trade uplift."
Referring to the elTorts of labor
leaders to secure tlie enactment rf
anti-injunction legislation President
Van Cleave said:
"We defected them in Washington
then the conspirators massed their
forces in Chicago and attempted to
frighten the Republican national con
vention and its candidates into sanc
tioning their undemocratic, anti-repub
llcan and un-\merican propaganda.
We defeated them there also. As the
plotters then contrived to place their
doctrine of diss favors into the Den
ver platform and as they obtained
formal endorsement for them from
the Democratic candidate we had no
alternative except to 1hrow our sup
port to the Chicago nominee. And we
have excellent reasons for knowing
our work told decisively In tbe gen
erul result.
"Fair minded, public spirited citi
sens will say that an organization
which by the acknowledgment of Its
own leaders cannot live unless it gets
a license to breatc the laws deserves
to die.
"In the United States at this mo
ment there is an absolutism which
violates the orders of its courts, which
denounces its judges and which re
pudiates and defies the laws and au
thority of the nation."
Ml disappoint-
John Kirby, Jr., of Day*
on, O., was
the unanimous choice of the nominat
ing committee as a candidate for
president of the association to suc
ceed James W Van Cleave.
CAUSES LOSS OF Sl bOO.OOU
Fire Destroys Seven-Story Block at
Akrcn, O.
Akron, O., May 19.—Fire in th
seven-story Hower block practically
destroyed the building and its cor
tents, causing a loss which will aggre
gate $1,500,000. Several girls em
ployed in the building had a narrow
escape. Firemen were in danger from
falling walls.
The building was occupied entirely
by light manufacturing companies.
Th^re were upward- of 200 employee
in the biiil lin when the f.re was dis
covered. The blaze started in the
basement and the occupants of the
block had plenty ot time tc escape,
although the young women were
thrown into a panic.
MRS. TAFT MUCH IMPROVED
President's Wife Recovering Freer.
Nervous Breakdown.
Washington, May 19.—Mrs. Taft.
wao suffered a nervous breakdown, Is
much improved. After the call of Dr.
Delaney, the attending physician, at
the White House it was announced
t*iat the president's wife had rested
comfortably and was much better.
Mrs. Taft became ill while on n
trip down the Potomac river with thr
president and a small party of friends.
The excitement, heat and exertion, as
the resident himself expressed it,
were too nnnh for her.
the "bad luck1 in baking, by
avoiding Poor Baking
Powder the cheap, or
big can kinds and the high
price Trust brands. They are unreliable—they too often
fail Doa't trust them.
Put your faith in Calumet—the only strictly high-grade
baking powder sold at a moderate cost. We absolutely
guarantee that the results will please you. Guaranteed
under all puie food laws—both State and National.
Refute substitutes—get Calumet*
Rtotirsd Highest Awerd WerWs Pure
Feed EapoejSseTCbicaf* 1MT
"1-
nil ft 'rtM
BREAD FAMINE
IS THREATENED
New York's East Side Bak
eries Close Down.
FOUR MDJO AFFECTED
Increase In Price ef Wheat Cause of
Trouble, Augmented by Coincident
Strike of Employes—Police Fear
Rioting and an Unusually Large
Number of Men Are Detailed foi
Duty in That Section.
New York, May 19.—A bread fam
Ire among the 700,000 residents of the
Eaat Side was inaugurated when more
than 400 bakeries closed down. The
trouble started with the increase ir
the price of wheat recently and was
augmented by the coincident strike of
the bakery employes on the East Side
At a meeting of the bakery owners
it was unanimously decided to close
all of their qhops, numbering more
than 400. The police, hearing of this
detailed an unusually large number of
men on duty in that section during
the hours when housewives usually
visit the bakeries. There was a fear
that the riotous scenes c.f a lew years
ago, when the price of meat was
raised, might be repeated.
Bakers who are not affected by th?
action of the meeting will not be able
to supply one-tenth of the demand for
bread in the crowded Kast Side and
therefore it was believed that there
would be au unprecedented demand
for flour and bread from other sec
tion*.
SHOCKING DOUBLE TRAGEDY
Young Couple Found Dead Four Days
After Marriage.
Portland, Ore., May 19.—Informa
tion has reached here of the finding,
four dayB after their marriage, of the
bodies of Louis H. Worley and his
bride at their home near Redmond, a
town in the vicinity of Prineville, Ore.
The tragedy Is shrouded in mystery.
Mrs. Worley's charred body was
found In the burned ruins of the
home, while that of her husband was
found in the barn with a bullet wound
in the temple. According to the ver
dict of the coroner's Jury, which held
an Inquest over Mrs. Worley's body,
the woman came to her death acci
dentally. Whether Worley committed
suicide or whether the couple were
victims of a double murder has not
been decided. Worley came to Ore
gon from 8t. T^ouis, where he was
born. He owned one of the best
farms In the district and was conoid
ered prosperous. Recently he sent
for Miss Ruth Leeroy of Chicago, his
sweetheart, who had known him in
the East, and she came here and
married him, the wedding taking place
Wednesday last.
BLOCKS TRAFFIC FOR
yvvp*
i
A
TIME
Partial Caveinof Famous Tunnel Near
Leadville, Colo.
Denver, May 19.—Nearly 600 feet of
the famous tunnel over Tennessee
pass on the Denver and Rio Grande
railway, located about five miles west
of Leadville, has caved in. There
were no casualties, but the tracks will
be blocked probably for three days.
The cavein occurred about 1,000
feet from the portal of the tunnel,
probably at one of three air shafts
that reach up through the tunnel roof,
and undoubtedly was caused by the
melting of the extremely heavy
snows.
The discovery of the cavein was
made by a track walker. Believing
that the vast mass of dirt and rock
had buried a train he hurried back to
the first station and gave the warning.
A train bearing engineers and officials
of the road was rushed to the scene,
but it was found that no one had been
hurt. Arrangements have been made
whereby traffic will be taken care of
by the Colorado Midland railway.
Tokio's Mayor uines Americana,
Tokio, May 19.—The mayor gave a
Japanese dinner in honor of Rear Ad
miral Giles B. Harber, commander of
the Third division of the Pacific
squadron. A geisha dance was the
principal entertainment provided dur
ing the dinner. There was no speech
making and the guests of the evening
thoroughly enjoyed the last of the
many functions which have marked
the reception of Harber's fleet while
II has been In these waters.
Kill* Wife} Wounds Stepson.
Atlanta, Ga., May 18. George
Burge, a carpenter out of employment,
returned to his home on the outskirts
of this city and, entering through a
rear window, went to his wife's room
and stabbed her to death. He then
went to the room of his stepson and
after a desperate struggle stabbed and
seriously lnjwred him. Burgs then
SMSpSd.
S--
.H' -t
MADISON. SOUTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY. MAY 19, 1909
MAKING FIGHT FOR TRAFFIC
•oo Line to Construct Three
Branch Lines.
Chicago, May IP.—It is said that a
direct line between Winnipeg and Chi
cago will be in operation over the
rails (if the Canadian Pacific railway
by the fall of 1910. This will be ac
complished by the building of u
ranch of the Soo line from Thiei
'Hiver Falls, Minn., to Duluth, meet
ing the plans of the Great Northern
railway in its projected line from
"Winnipeg to the international bound
ary.
The Soo will. In addition, soon be
gin work on two other branch lines
These are made possible by the pur
chase of the Wisconsin Central by the
Canadian Pacific. One of these
branches will be a Cutoff intended to
shorten the distance between Minne
apolis and Chicago, thereby placing
the eompanj in a position to bid foi
both freight and passenger traffic be
tween Chicago and the Twin Cities.
The other branch line will be con
strutted from Booten. eighty miles
west of St. Taul on the main line ol
the Soo line, to Duluth, forming a
direct connection between the So*1
line and the Head of the Lakes.
SERVED IN THE PHILIPPINES
William S. Washburn Appointed Civil
Service Commissioner.
Washington, May 19—President
Taft has announced the nomination of
William S. Washburn as civil service
commissioner, vice James T. Will
lams, resigned. He was for years a
civil service commission employe
here and served as civil service com
missioner in the Philippines under
Mr Taft. His nomination is bastd on
his Philippine record. Mr. Washburn
Is a resident of Now York.
President Taft also sent to the sen
ate the nomination of Walter E
Clark as governor of Alaska, to sue
ceed Governor Hoggatt, reined. Mr.
Clurk has for years been the Wash
ington correspondent of the Seattle
Post-Intelligencer and is unusually
well informed on Alaskan affairs.
MI I
SENT TO THE SENATE
FINANCE COMMITTEE
Gore Resolution for Imresffga
floo
ill
Senator Aldrich said it was evi
dent that such an investigation as
that contemplated by the resolution
could not be conducted before the
pending tariff bill was disposed of,
but he had no objection to such an in
vestigation being undertaken. Sen
ator Carter pointed out the fact that
in doing this work the finance conn
mittee would necessarily cover the
same ground which the proposed tar
iff commission would cover.
By a vote of 50 to 29 the resolution
was sent to the committee on finance,
Senators Bristow, Crawford and La
Follette voting no with the Demo
crats.
Senator Stone's amendment to con
tinue tbe Dlrgley rates on razors was
defeated, 86 to 43.
MAY WHEAT GOES
fHfttlj)
Retail Puces.
Washington^ May It. Senatoi
Gore's resolution directing the com
mittee on finance to conduct an in
vesication into wholesale and retail
prices of commodities was discussed
before the senate at some length
Seeking to have the resolution adopt
ed Mr. Gore said he wished to have
statements concerning the extortion
ate prices of retail dealers fully
probed so that the country might
know just where the responsibility
for high prices rests.
TO St.!
New High Record for the Season at
Chicago.
Chicago, May 19.—Closing ot the
op£n trades of Tracy A Co., whose
failure was announced at New York
sent wheat prices up on the board of
trade. May at $1.30 per bushel mak
lag a new high record.
The market had been in session an
hour before the notice to close the
Tracy trades was posted. This ac
tion, however, had been expected and
the settlement of accounts begun
July wheat advanced 1% cents, to
$1.15%. The high price of May was
an advance of 1% cents. The volum
of trade was not large.
REWARDS AGGREGATE $60,OUU
Detectives Swarming to Soene ol
Great Northern Holdup.
Spokane, Wash., May 19.—Respond
big to the offer of rewards aggregat
Ing 166,000 by the federal authorities
and the railroad for the capture and
eonvlction of the bandits who held up
and plundered a Great Northern train
near Spokane detectives we gathering
here from many places.
8pokane police believe that the rob
bers made their way Into Spokane
and a close watch Is being kept OB
JMbfcMAA MMl feMNMHIi
?HV
v
$
Tl
Jill
Boys' Knee Pants Suits
In the newest Spring
Styles up to $6.50 values
$4.75
SPECIAL
Blue Serge included.
Miss Grinager
Fashionable Milliner
Hy lew Sprif Stock
las irrtved and 1 wB
le pleased to ha
TC
the
ladies call aid
Sped
it.
7
MISS GRINAGER
THOMPSON & LEE,
Practical Electricians
••Keep on Hand—
Electrical Supplies
Wiring and other Elec
trical Work Dose on short
-x
m»m
WT1KUND BtfflDUG
Foley's Honey and Tar is a safeguard
against seriates results from sprliwoolda
which tafianie the lungs and develop
into pMumonia. Avoid eoi nterfeits by
insisting upon having the genuine Fol
ey's Honey asd Tar, which oontains no
*. H. Anderso. i
ROYAL SPECIAL
Owing to the extremely unseasonable
weather we are forced to make some
sacrifice on our Spring Stock regard
less of profits. This offer is
FOR CASH ONLY
8 DAYS
(TIM Hat $3.00
Shirt 1.00
Suspenders .50
lie .50
E O
MADISON CEMENT CO.
J. S. Thompson
Sc
Son, Prop.
Sidewalk Workers and
all Kinds of Cement Work
Phone Red-450
ioimiHHiEr^
MAY1522,
v-J 1 INCLUSIVE
Royal Special No. 1
With any Mans Suit in the Store
at $12.50 and upward we will
present you ABSOLUTELY fREE,
$5 worth of furnishings consisting
of the following:
Royal Special No. 2
With any Young Man's Sail in the
Store at $7.50 and upward we
wiN present you ABSOLUTELY fRCE
$3.00 worth of fornisliings con
sisting of the fofiawins
/Ik Hat
I
Total $5.00
You can select the above furnishings from our entire stock. Cost you notfcwg
EXTRA SPECIAL!
...
50c and 75c Knee
Pants, broken sizes
38c
JOS.tlLNKIN, Prop.
LOOK AT THESE
C0LAPSABIE BABY CARTS
The best on the market
They'must be teen to
be appreciated.
We go, fgfogMt
line of
Ventre
Art Square*
Lace Curtains
Handsoae
Upholstered Rockers
See My Line and Get Prices
HR. C. O. ESTREMr
Qfffcs mm Tbs Mg.Slore
ft-,'!
S
•,
r«^
2jf'
c*' if
s
,^3
$1.S0
Shirt .75
Tie .35
I Suspender^ 25
Hafldkerdmf .15
Total $3.00
h?
50 Pair Men'* Shoe*,
broken sizes, up to $5
values, to close out at
$2.85:
r, 7
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