OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, June 29, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-06-29/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ife
I I
.•
x.
!r Ji!
Si"':
Yankton—The nows has reached this
city of the marriage at Claremont.
Cal.. on Wednesday, June 23, of Judge
Robert B. Tripp, preeiding judge of the
first South Dakota judicial circuit, and
Miss liertha (irons, eldest daughter of
Mrs. Mary Gross of this city. Miss
Gross h.is been teaching in California,
for several years past. Judge and Mrs.
Tiipp will visit a number of coast
cities before their teturn to Yankton to
reside.
Big Htone—All Big Stone and the
surrounding country axe in the midst
of the preparations for the eleventh an
nual chantuaqua, which will be held
at Hiiupson Park, the noted summer re
port on the shore of Big Stone lake.
Tbe chautauqua will cover two weeks,
lieginning on the 1st of July, and com
ing to a cloee on the 15tb.
Aberdeen—A racing event at the fair
grounds which attriicted a large ciowd
was a match race between Colonel
James Elliott's horve, tbe Artist, and
Janea M. Jenkins'* hexw,
The Big Store.....
A Nice Showing of
WHITE HATS
For the Girls who
Graduate are
NOW ON DISPLAY
.... At The
Morse Millinery Parlors
©Ije ©atiy graft et
MADIHOM, IOOTR DitOti.
TELEPHONE, NO. 269.
4-
1 I'KSDAY, JI NK •»». 10Oi»
•••1 iraioMrnoi.
•II, 1 ft 00
til, A month* I.MI
mall, I month* 1.00
ill, 1 month
e*rrUrp« tn» 10
»r
4
"T
J.f «TA Propvtatoi
H. 1 tTi 111.. Ba*la*««
STATE NEWS
fHoox Falls—kvernor Vess«j, Unit
ed States Attorney Wagner and TT. C.
Cook. (-hairuian of the tepublican state
committee. have gone to Washington.
The gentlemen did not anonnce tho
objects of their journey to tho na
ttonal capital, but it is understood
that it has to do with federal pa
tronage for South Dakota.
Pierre— Governor Vesaoy has graft
ed a requisition for Lee Koppert,
wanted iu Pierre, Witsh., on a charge
of wife desertion Keppert is being
held at Deadwood for the Washington
officers.
Hturgis—A heavy electrical storm
visited this vicinity last night. A
great amount of rain fell. Lightning
struck the Troop stable at Fort
Meade and killed four cavalry horses
in their stalls. A sentry wan knocked
off his horse there, but escaped injury.
A horea belonging to Ed Borrow,
west of hturgis was also killed by
lightning.
Vmm.
the
Our Annual Muslin Underwear Sale
Commences to-morrow and will last for 7 days. We hare a larger and better as
sortment than ever before at prices from 10c to $4 a piece. A beautilul line tf
4 PIECE MUSLIN UNDERWEAR SETS
A DISCOUNT OF 25 PER CENT TO 40 PER CENT WILL BE GIVEN ON
LADIES TAILOR MADE SUITS DURING THIS SALE.
500 Men's, Boys' and Children's Suits to be sold at
60c ON THE OLL
We hare 3 Great Shoe Bargains, don't for get that A lot of Men's Hats, values
from $2.00§to"$3.00 at $1.49 each. Lots of other bargains all around the Store.
J. A. JOHNSON
race was for a purse of f400. and side
bets aggiegating nearly $500 more.
Vnne won in three straight beats.
Watertown—Last Sunday there were
88 persona received into the Methodist
church, as follows: 85 from prolwtion
into full tuemliership 2 were received
liy letter from another community. 1
was receive! on probation. There
were 4 persons baptized, all young
men. Seventeen of tbe new mesnbere
were adults.
Elk Point—D. M.Dickerwm of Ricn
laud began the marketing of bis straw
berries last week. He said that bis
crop was veiy good this year and price*
are good also, although I hey are higher
in tho big cities than here. He has
about 20 people picking l»errien in his
patch of six acres and believes it will
be two weeks lefore they complete the
picking. He also has four acres of
rasplnTries which will lie maiket*d
in July and he thinks he will have a
big crop. His plums are doing better
than they have done foi years and he
has top grafted a hardy variety of wiu
tor apples that do well in this climate
and has over 100 of these grafted trees
bearing fruit.
Watertown—The result of spreading
rails, seven cars and the engine of a
South Dakota Central gravel train
were thrown into a ditch, seven miles
south of Nunda yesterday afternoon
The train was traveling at a rate of
twenty-five miles an hour The enui
neer and fireman were tarown around
in tho cab, but escaped with no serious
injuries. A wrecker was brought to
the scene in a short time, and after
working for several hours, the track
was repaired so as to enable the pas
senger from Sioux Falls to get
through.
Foley's llonoy and Tar is a safeguard
against serious results from springoolds
which inflame the lungs and develop
into pneumonia. Avoid counterfeits by
insisting upon having the genuine Fol
ey's Honey and Tar, which contains no
harmful drugs.—J. II. Anderso.'
If you have backache and urinary
troubles you should take Foley's Kidney
Kemedv to strengthen and build up the
kidneys so they will aci properly, as a
serious kidney trouble may develop --J
H. Anderson.
Wt, often wonder how any person can
be porsuadod into taking anything but
Foleys Honey and Tar for coughs, colds
and lnng trouble. Do not be fooled
into aocepting "own make'' of other sub
stitutes. The genuine contains no
harmful drupe and is in a yellow £aak
age.y—J. H. Andetaoi
Madison, S. D.
5 1 1 E A N A V E
1
TARIFF TALK
The Vote of Senator Crawford
on Important Schedules
Analyzed.
Washington. June 28.—The senator
ial corresitondents who by dispatches
in the newspapers two or three days
ago undertook to create the impulsion
that Senator Crawford had suddenly
changed his course and hastened to the
support of the finance committee and
Senator Aldrich.were jarred from their
disillusion yesterday when he took the
floor with Senator Cummins and made
a spirited and active fight against the
pioposal of the committee to increase
the duty upon sciap iron, as fixnl ly
the bouse bill from 50 cents a ton to
£2.50 a ton
The only evidence for the statements
made in the newspapers recently was
the vote of Senator Crawfjrd upon the
woolen schedule. People in South Da
kota will readily understand why he
opposed making changes iu the
woolen schedule,which necessarily in
volved a leduction iu the rate of
duty upon raw wool. Ftom his
viewpoint, the contest in the woolen
schedule was in reality a contest lie
tweea the carded woolen manufac
turers and the worsted woolen manu
facturers, the carded wool people want
a change in the schedule that would
enable them to get cheaper wools It
follows, of course, that tbe changes
urged necessarily affectod the duty up
on wool. The painful experience of
the wool growers in South Dakota af
ter the change made by tne Wilson act
of 1894, have not been forgotten, and
solely in the interest of tie wool glow
ers of South Dakotat in this instance
Senator Crawford supported the woolen
schedules, which had been reported
and passed by the house, and which
was not aiaterially changed by the
finance committee in the senate.
When the -use has been closed, it
will be tound that Senator Crawford's
course has been consistent from the lie
ginning to tbe end and that he will
not find it necessary to make any
apology for a single vote be has cast.
As to the rate lixed by the finance
committee on print paper, according to
Senator Crawford's view, as given to
your coiiespondent. that matter is en
tirely different from the impression
that has been created, The senator is
emphaUonUf ia favor of both ft**
GREAT
CLEARANCE SALE!
COAST LUMBER
New Schedule of Rates for Mil
waukee Extension -First
Through Train.
Aberdeen,June 28. —Division Freignt
and Passenger Agent O. F. Waller of
tbe Milwaukee announces that the
lumber tariffs en shipments from tbe
Pacific coast country aie now effective
and are lower tnan rates heietofore ob
tained to this city, which news will lie
welcomed 'by builders and dealers
alike. A great deal more Pacific
coast lumbei will be used in this sec
tion in the future which is one direct
result of the building of the Chicago,
Milwaukee & l'uget Sound road.
In this connection it mav be an
nounced that the Milwaukee will not
tfocome a member of the Transconti
nental Freight association, made up
of the lines included witbin that
classification. This does not mean
that the road ccntemplates a rate war,
but merely that it considers it can do
better by itself and its patrons for tbe
present by remaining independent of
t'ne association. Of course when
freight tariffs are to be changed, the
interstate commerce commission must
pass upon them first, but the decision
ot the road to remain out of the group
in the association will do away with
any conferences which might be de
manded before it could adopt such
rates. The road expects to have iu
operation ^within a short time a
freight schedule of 144 hours from
Chicago.
Press dispatches state that the gen
eral offices of tne company for the
handling of all business west of the
Missouii river will be located in Seat
tle and that already the men have heon
started toward that city, the expecta
tion being that matters will he so set
tled that the work will .be on in the
western offices almost immediately.
The offices will De located in the fine
new Henry building in a short time,
temporary quarters only being occupied
at present.
The first through passenger train
from Chicago to Seattle over the line
has reached Seattle, hearing President
A. J. Earling of the Milwaukee sys
tem, Roswe
11 Mider of the Itoard of
directors, President H. R. Williams of
tbe Puget Sound road, H. B. Earling,
general superintendent, and K. M.
Calkins, traffic manager. Tbe actual
running time was ninety-two hours,
though a week was consumed by the
paity as inspection was made and side
trips taken. The train passed through
Alx'ideen
FOLEYSIftWEMAR
OF.
Trimmed Hats
AT
MISS BOGEN'S
Beginning June 26
'.••ilp wood and fiee wood pulp, which
re used oy the paper mills iu Wiscon
u and along the Canadian border in
N w York and in New England in the
•inufacture of cheap print paper.
Tiese mills import from Canada the
w od pulp and pulp wood used in the
anafacture of this cheap print paper,
•t .d, of course, the senator stands upon
i e platform of the republican party
u South Dakota in favor of free wood
ilp and free pulp wood. His vote,
aich has been referred to, was not
tst upon this question at all, because
has not yet come up for a vote.
1
He only vote so far, which he has
i net upon the subject, relates to tbe
print paier itself, which these Amer
in paper mills in Wisconsin. New
jrk and New England manufacture
1 Tie Dingley rate on this print paper is
a ton. The house bill proposes to
duce it to #2 a ton and the senate
iance committee reported in favor of
fixing it at #4 a ton. When the mat
was up for debate. Senator LaFol
i te stated that the paper mills in
Wisconsin could not continue to manu
i dure print paper, if the duty was re
iuced to $2 a ton, but won Id be com
piled to at once abandon its manufac
ire, and if such a late were enforced
'mediately, it would put them out of
isiness. He favored retaining a duty
ft a ton until 1912 to enable then
gradually go ont of the business of
manufacturing print paper. The only
(Terence between nis position and
at of Senator Crawford was that the
itter favored fixing the duty at #4 a
n without putting a limit upon the
me so as to enable these mills to con
tine the manufacture of print paper
i)on the American side as long as it is
•ssible for them to do it, and ^if they
n get free pulp wood and fre«i wood
ilp from Canada, they will probably
•1 able to continue in the business in
'finitely.
DISCUSS WORLD'S PROGRESS
Uplift Workers in Convent!#*! fet
Boston.
Boston, June 2ft.—The third annual
sociological conference established by
George W. Coleman of the Christian
Endeavor World began today at Sagn
more Beach. The conference, which
will last throe days, has called ti
gethcr a large number of social work
ers, who will discuss such subjects ns
"The Social Progress of the Pa^t
Year," "The Whole World's Socl n
Unrest," "The Negro in a Demc
racy," "How Industrial Education Will
Bring Social Reconstruction" and
"The Cost of Crowding Women Work
ers."
The speakers include Rabbi Stephen
S. Wise of the Free synagogue. New
York, William Ellis, the Phlladel
phia journalist Robert A. Woods "f
South End House, Boston Mre. RfO
mond Robins of Chicago and Ray
Stnnnard Baker, the writer.
Double Drowning in uanaaa.
Winnipeg, Man., June 29.—A doubn
drowning occurred at Fort Willlaiii.
Ont when Mrs. J. L. Langton, a brlil.
of twenty year.*, and her broth* i.
William Wayd, a Canadian Pacific tii
mnn, lost their lives by the upsettimr
•f their nanoe in an eddy of Kan.
river.
TARIFF BILL PUZZLES TAFT.
President Told Wool Men Story Apro
pos of Schedule Intricacies.
President Taft recently confessed
a delegation of Ohio woolen inanuffi
turers that he has liecome bewildered
by the Intricacies of the tariff mens
ure. The delegation of manufacturers
was the seventh that has called In th
last few days, and all of them haw
urged conflicting changes in the sch»
ule as proposed in the senate bill. T!
president threw up his hands when
the wiolen men sprang a seventh su
pestion radically different from those
made previously by other textile mnn
ufacturers.
"Gentlemen, gentlemen," he is re
ported to have exclaimed, "you remii.d
me of au experience I had on my re
cent trip Into the south. When pass
lng through the mountains of Tenni s
see a reception committee boarded our
car to accompany us to a town in
which I was to speak. They were
fine fellows, nnd the chnlrman of
the
committee was anxious to tell me nil
nlout the country. Our train was
running along the bank of a beautiful
Stream, and I asked its name.
The
chairman mumbled something that
was unintelligible. I asked him to
repeat It. Again he mumbled so that
1 couldn't cnteh what he said.
"'1 beg your pardon,' I said, 'but I
didn't understand It. Will you Bpell
ltr
'Waal, I don't reckon as how I kin,'
he replied. 'Some folks spells it one
way, other folks spells It another, and
still other folks spells it different. In
my pore Jedgement. jedge, they ain't
no correct way to spell It.'"
The president looked around the
group laughingly and added that, while
he was not prepared to admit he was
quite so uninformed on the tariff, he
would confess that on some of the
schedules the story explained his posl
tlon falrlv well.
Financial Statement
No. 8,14V. Report of lh* condition of tho First
National Hank, at Mariteon, In tha HtHtPof South
Dakota,
at th»
clono of
tnip|niiip
IIioihIIh
.Tune 'J3, 1(*K
HKMll'lU'BI*.
Jjoane anil ll«count« 11
Ovirilr»fti,
Hoourt*! and anHocnmd
U S
hiik to 8tKiiri
t.
circulation
hoiifw, furniture
22,500.011
lo,ooi mi
s,ODo.ini
I S. to *ecurn I!. U. dnpoMta..
lion de, iSfCiintli*B,otr
Hankliii!
and fixtures..
Km'from National tank« (not reaxrva
St,»lV2l
[)tu- from Htate Hunks nnd Rankers...
IMit* from approved rtwrvt* agents 42,(Hi!
Chi'ek^ nml other chhIi items
Nnti.H ofottiHr National lianka
1WI
4,05o*i
fractional pap«r curreucy, ulckel* and
(•Mite
Lawful Money Keeerve In B»nk viz
•ft.26
Sp"Cl.' fa.'KCi.^
Legal tender note*
V.UOU.U)
Redemption fund with U. 8. treMurer
(f per cout of circulation) 1,1am.no
Total |440,«7 i
UASIUTIM.
Capital stock paid In 50.0.XI
Surplus fund
It,Wo.
t'lnlividod profit*,
Imp up"QMe
and
taxcK paid 17 ifi'J
National tiank n t»t outstanding *£i,&00
Dun to otln'r National hank* 8,4&s
lm
to stati' liankn ami banket#. .... 44,IIHv
Individual di'pomtf KUbjivt toel»«Ck....
1M.HOI
Demand i trtlflcatOM of dopowlt
Time 'i rtiflrnte« of ilt»)osit 12a]«{r
CVrtifiid
C'hookx
Canhi^rV checks outstanding l.Ms
I'Dlt^d t)tat«a deposit* 10,00*1
Total
State of
Sonth
I,. McCalllHter, cAehlerof tht above named
hank, do »olt*mnlf nw««r that the above statement
is
tru« to Uie lM*t of
iny
$10.00 values for
8.00
PHONE 195
COAL
a u
6.00
5.00
4.00
3.00
a
Teachers' Institute.
Notice is hereby given that the
Lak« county teachers' inistituto will
hold Jnno 28 to Jnly 3, 1909, in
connection with the gammer school
now in wwion at the btate Normal.
L. C. Kellogg, county rapt, of aoboola.
DoafnesR Oannot bo Cured
by local applications, us thoy oanmt
roach tho diseased portion of the ear.
There if* only one way to cure doAfnoBfl
and that is by constitutional romedlen.
Deafness is cauaod hy an inflamed
uiiIobh
jj(W
Dakota, county of Lake, hh
I,U.
knowledge
and
belief
U MeCAM.ISTKlt, Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to
before me
ttiln rth
day «f Junt*, tWW Fiunk O 1'ai.mkh, NoUry
FuLUc.
u
a
2.00
a
u
41
Come Early and Have Your
Choice.
E. W. KETCHAH
will deliver promptly tetay fwrt el tho
the best grade of
HARD AND SOFT COAL
PHONE 256
We handle only the
best and deliver to
all parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
GRINAGER BROS
UNLOADING SALE
CONTINUED ONE WEEK TO
Saturday, July 3rd
Special Prices
con­
dition of the tnuoous lining of the Eu
stachian Tube. When thiH tube i8 in
Humed you have a rumbling sound or
imperfect hearing, ami when it is en
tii olr closed, deafness is the result, and
the inllatnation can he taken out
and this tube is restored to its normal
condition, hearing will bo destroyed for
ever nine case* out of ten are caused by
Catarrh, which ie nothing hut an in
flamed condition of the mucoun nurfaoen.
We will give One Hundred Dollarwfor
any case of doafnoss (caused by catarrhi
that cannot bo cured br Hall's Catarrh
Cure. Bend for circulars, free.l
7
Comet—AttMt: F. D. rim, 1, L. Fun. K
r. McCaujore*.
F. J. CHENEY .V CO Toledo, O.
Hold by Druggist, 75,
Take Hall's Family Piila for oonsUpaUon
$7.00
6.00
4.50
3.75
2.85
2.25
1.50
dty
COAL
on
all
Clothing-Special Prices
on Shirts, Underwear,
Straw Hats, Oxfords,
Work Shirts, Overalls,
etc.
WE WANT THE CASH
McDANIEL & TRIMMER
CONSUMING CIVIL ENGINfIRS
Special Attention Given feo
Land Drainage and Surveys
CHAS. A. TRIMMER, MADISON, S&
Office with F. G. fall
DR. C. O. ESTREM,
Physician and Surgeon
OfFICf PHONE 293
MUSE PHONE, Greet 439
Office over Tne Big Store MADISON. S.
OAK
|)R. H. P. GULST1NE,
...DENTIST™
PN0NE 293
Office ever The lit SW jMAPtSON. S. M*

xml | txt