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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, July 16, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-07-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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BfiSfiG KESSASE
TO (MEHfcES
Aldrich and Payne Called to
the White House.
TAFT'S ATTITUDE IS HRM
That the President Insists Upon Hie
Adoption of the Corporation Tax
Amendment is the Substance of a
Report fay the Senate and House
Leaders Following a Conference
With the Chief Executive.
Washington, July 16.—That Presi
dent Tart "stands right where he has
stood all alqaig" and will insist upon
the adoption of the corporation tax
amendment is the substance of a re
port made to the tariff conference by
Senator Aldrich and Representative
Payne. The loaders of the senate and
house had been at the White House,
having been summoned by the presi
dent to explain a persistent rumor
that the corporation tax proposition
was in danger of being dropped in
Conference,
It had t^een reported and not denied
that a majority of the conferees were
opposed to the adoption of the meas
ure providing for a 2 per cent tax
upon the net earnings of corporations
organized for profit. The announce
ment that the administration would
be satisfied with a tax of 1 per cent
and that the redraft of the amend
ment made by Attorney
^Powder
fl'^^V-1!.#^ Absolutely Pure
i
The Only Baking Powder
made from
Royal Grape Cream of Tartar
Hhade from Grapes—
Royal Baking Powder lias not its counterpart at
home or abroad. Its qualities, which make the
food nutritious and healthful, are peculiar to itself
and are not constituent in other leavening agents.
General
Wickorsham would contain this
change did not remove the objections
entertained by the conference. The
representatives of the house protest
ed against the federal government's
entering upon such a "new and rad
ical method of raising revenues."
Discouraging reports about the re
ception planned for the proposition
when it should be returned to the
conferees determined the president to
get at the bottom of the situation and
to learn, if he could, whether the ad
verse sentiment was strong enough to
encompass the defeat of the amend
ment.
LITTLE PROGRESS 13 MADE
Conferees Consider Cotton Goods and
Lead Products.
Washington, July Hi.—Two ques
tions which it was known would be as
stubbornly fought as any in the tariff
bill, namely, cotton goods and lead
products, were taken up by the con
ferees, but were not disposed of dur
ing the forenoon session. An early
Adjournment was taken to permit th*
house members to attend the sessien
of that body and to allow Senator Al
drich and Representative Payne to go
to the White House as the president's
guests at luncheon.
Members of the house
conference
committee declined to accept the sen
ate amendments to the cotton sched
ule when that subject was taken up.
These amendments consist chiefly of
changes from ad valorem to "specific
duties fer the purpose of carrying out
the original intent of the Dinghy
rates, which senate conferees assert
have been pulled down by misinter
pretation of the Din^lev law.
TWO YOUNG WOMEN DROWNED
Girl Br.th^rr? L«f Their Lives at
&!innec.pcl'3.
M!nnoape!t£. July 16.—Jennie Hage
lln, Aged •. cr.ty-oTip, and Jessie Chris-
drowned in the Mississippi rivet iu
this city.
The girls were In the habit of swim
mine in the river early every morn
ing. They pot out too far in the cur
rent and the water, being exception
ally cold, chilled them and when they
were carried off their feet they were
unable to resist the current.
Elizabeth Haselln, aged nineteen
sister of one of the victims, was also
in the water when the two girls wi nt
down. She was about to be swept
away when Kmil Zinzraz. driver for
the City Ice company, saw the girl'.-*
predicament and plunged into the
I water, clothes and all. He reached
Elizabeth and dragged her to the
shore, but was too late to nive the
others.
COULD DO IT OVER AGAIN
Weston Feels Fine After Walking
Across Continent.
San Francisco, July Ifi.—Edward
Payson Weston has handed to Pos-f
master Arthur Flake the letter which
Postmaster Morgan of New York city
gave to W ton March 15 last. Tlu
little ceremony ended one of the most
remarkable feats of pedestrian istn
ever recorded. Although Weston was
four days behind the schedule he had
set for himself the old man-was not
down hearte-l.
"It was a great walk," he said, "and
but for unforeseen difficulties and
hardships in the last three weeks of
my journey would have been here on
the 100th day. Still I am feeling fine
and er.nl,1 do it ovor again."
NUMBER OF PEOPLE KILLED
Building Being Remodeled at Phila
delphia Collapses.
Philadelphia, July 16.—Several per
sons were killed and aDcut a score
injured by the collapse of a portion
of a five-story brick building at Elev
enth and Market streets. The wreck
age is piled thirty feet high and the
number of killed will not be definitely
known until the debris Is cleared
away. The police say they
believe
tight workmen are under the wrec\
age and that they are probably dea i.
None of the injured is believed to be
fatally hurt.
The building Is an old fashioned
structure about twenty-five feet wide
on Market street and 100 feet do
on Eleventh street. It was being
modeled for the United Gas Improve
ment company as a sales department.
The two fronts up to the second story
had been torn out and the upper
floors were shored up by heavy tim
bers. The entire front and about
forty-five feet of the Eleventh street
side fell.
The building stood at one of the
busiest corners of the shopping dis
trict and the sidewalks were crowded
with people. The wall fell with a
terrific roar. Tremendous excitement
ensued and reports spread that many
were killed, some of them women.
BANK OFFICIAL ARRESTED
Is Accused of Misappropriating More
Than $100,000.
New Orleans, July 16.—Occupying
a prison cell instead oi his palatial
home In State street is the fate of
Wyatt II. Ingram, Jr., for t)it» past
six years trusted officer of the Hiber
nian Bank and Trust company of New
Orleans, who has been arrested on
the charge of forgery and defalcation.
According to officers of the Hiber
nian Bank and Trust company and the
district attorney's office Ingram made
complete confession of misappropri
ating $100,000 of the bank's funds and
3f forging the name of a depositor to
i check for $5,000. Other fraudulent
acts were executed by vouchers which
fee, as trust officer, drew against in
active accounts. Speculation in stock*
and bonds is ascribed as the cause of
'm Ci&Y»X»£il'..
COMPELLED TO
ANSWER QUERY
Mrs. Thaw Says Harry
Threaten to Kill Her.
PLEADS TO BE EXCUSED
Explains Her Position to the Court
and With Tears in Her Eyes Begs
Him Not to Compel Her to Reply.
Further Testifies That Thaw Told
Her He Was Not Insane When Hs
Killed Stanford White.
White Plains, N. Y., July 16.—Ev«
lyn Nesbit Thaw took the witness
stand In the hearing on Harry K.
Thaw's mental condition in the su
preme court here. Mrs. Thaw ap
e red as a witness for the state,
which is opposing the release of her
fumband from the Matteawan insane
n.-ylum.
Justice Mills, having ruled that the
witness could answer the questions
in regard to the threat made to kill
her by her husband during a conversa
tion at Matteawan asylum which had
been excluded from her former testi
mony on the grounds of privilege.
Deputy Attorney General Clark asked
her:
"Did Hairy K. Thaw at that time
say this to you, or this in substance,
*1 shall have to kill you when I get
out of here?"'
Mrs. Thaw appealed to the court
and begged Justice Mills not to make
her answer the question.
"Can I claim a privilege on the
ground that it would tend to incrim
inate me?" asked Mrs. Thaw.
Justice Mills said she could not
claim a privilege on that account.
Turning to the court with tears in
her eyes Mrs. Thaw said:
Pitiful Plea to the Court.
**I don't want to answer that ques
tton it places me in a terrible pos!
tion. My husband will refuse to sup
port me the minute I answer it and 1
will incur his everlasting enmity. I
am very much afraid to answer it I
don't care how he has treated me, I
am still married to him and I do not
want to answer it."
Justice Mills quickly Instructed the
witness to answer and she said with
a long drawn sigh:
"Yes, he did."
Mrs. Thaw further testified that
during the same conversation Harry
Thaw told her he was not crazy on
the night he shot Stanford White.
"I only missed him by a minute on
the night before," the witness said
her husband told her.
Thaw sat with his eyes intently on
his wife as she testified and shook
his head when she told of the threat.
Mrs. Thaw was excused and An
thf.py C. Corn stock, president of the
New York 8ociety for the Suppression
of Vice, was called as the next wit
ness, Mr. Comstock's evidence re
lated to conversations he had had
with Thaw regarding alleged wrongs
done young glrla by White and oth
ers and was largely a repetition of
witness' testimony on the trial of
Thaw for the murder of White.
Thaw's speech and manner during
these conversations, the witness said,
were entirely rational.
BRIDE TAKEN BY PARENTS
Wife of Few Hours Speeding Across
Continent.
Bakersfield, Cal., July 16.—Missing
his bride of a few hours only Edward
Francisco Vurrell, a lx)g Angeles busi
ness man, is disconsolate, while his
wife, kidnapped under the guard of
her parents, now Is speeding across
the continent to Chicago.
Thus love's young dream. In which
Miss Jane Barber, a talented vocalist,
figures as a bride, is shattered, tem
porarily at least.
Their love making all unknown to
the bride's parents, soon ripened into
& decision to wed. Mias Barber went
to Los Angeles and when she returned
she was Mrs. Murrell. The parents,
learning the truth, discountenanced
the step and, it is said, after tears
and pleadings by her parents, the
daughter prepared hastily tor the
Eastern flight.
JOIN MEN NOW ON STRIKE
Three Thousand Tin Workers Walk
Out at Newcastle, Pa.
Pittsburg, July 16.—At the expira
tion of their wage scale at midnight
8,000 workmen, members of the Tin
Plate Workers' Protective association,
walked out of the tin plate plants at
Newcastle, Pa., and joined the strik
ers of the Amalgamated Association
of Iron, Steel and Tin Workers.
The trouble results from the "open
shop" policy declared by the Amer
toan Sheet and Tin
Plate
i.
company
HADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, JtXV 16, 1909
OXFORDS
Entire line of $3.50,
$4.00 and $4.50 in
black, ox-blood and tan
$2.85
Choice
FURNISHINGS
25c and 35c Neckwear, strict- 4 Qp
ly Up-to date. Special
25 doz. Black and Tan Hose, good
quality. As long as they last
per pair 1v
25c Black, Tan, Fancy, men's
PftUlmv, July 16.—Tke situation
at the plant of the Pressed Steel Car
company at McKees Rocks, adjacent
to this city, where 3,500 men are on
strike, is quieter. Following a night
of terror and wild disorder, In which
thirty persons were shot or beaten, a
detachment of the Pennsylvania state
constabulary arrived and soon after
wards the rioting stopped. The men
are frightened and awed by the pres
ence of the mounted state police.
When the police reached the plant
they stationed their horses inside the
great steel plant and then took up
positions outside the fence. A mo
ment later a brick struck one of the
troopers. Instantly th- mill gate was
thrown open, several troopers vaulted
into the saddle and the next minute
dashed fiercely into a crowd of strik
ers and their sympathizers. As they
galloped through the crowd the state
police struck right and left with heavy
riot clubs. The crowd became de
moralized under the terrific assault
and fled in all directions.
That incident occurred at daybreak.
It had a potent effect and since that
time the strikers satisfied themselves
by congregating at the gates of the
mill, but not daring to commit any
act that would cause a repetition ol
constabulary strike methods.
Strikers and the constabulary
clashed several times during the day
and twelve persons were injured
three of whom are in a serious condi
tion. Over a score of strikers and
their sympathizers have been placed
under arrest.
MUCH FARM LAND FLOODED
Mississippi River Continues to Riss
Near 8t. Louis.
St. IjOuSs. July 16.—The Mississippi
river continues to rise. Manufactur
ing concerns on the Illinois side are
moving their stocks to higher ground,
fearing a storm will wash the waves
over the levees. Citizens of Cahokia
worked all night strengthening the
levees, wnich will stand but a slight
rise.
Five thousand acres of farm land
are covered with water by the rail
road embankment breaking at Cul-de
Sac, five miles north of St. Charles,
Mo. The Missorrl river at St. Charlef
is five miles wide, but is falling at
Heraasa sad Jsffejrsoa CK?- Tfce
4
Hosiery. Special OL
25c Boy's Balbriggan Shirts
4 Op
and Drawers, each OL
Harvest Straw Hats up to 50c JtZf
values. Choice JL
About 100 Soft Felt Hats up QCT|-.
to $3.00 values. Choice
Monarch $1.00 and Cluett $1.50
DRESS SHIRTS
To reduce our stock we offer $1.00
Monarch Shirts, about 200 in
all, with or without collars H^Lr
Special
$1.50 Cluett Shirts, about 150 in
all, with or without collars
Choice
$1.15
This is a don't miss it.
ihvlES COWED BY
PRESENCE OF TROOPS
Latter Use Clubs Freely in Dis
persing Growl
Fourteen Thousand Miners Quit
Grand Annual
JULY CLEARING SALE
OF
SUMMER MERCHANDISE
TWO WEEKS
Beginning
SATURDAY, JULY 17tii
Ending
SAIURDAY, JULY 31st
You can save from 25 to
50% during this sale. I am
determined to close out all
summer weights in clothing
and furnishings REGARD
LESS OF PROFITS.
Some odds and ends you will
find BELOW COST. If you
ever attended any of my
previous sales yo know well
that you can bank to find
them as represented.
PLEASE DON'T ASK ME
TO CHARGE as I am quot
ing these Prices for
STRICTLY CAS#
Soke
flood here is caused by the high wat
in the Missouri.
ONLY AFFECTS ONE COMPANY
Work
In Pittsburg District.
Pittsburg, July 16.—Over 14,000 min
ere employed in the mines of the
Pittsburg Coal company, located in
the Pittsburg distric t, have gone on
strike. The strike order was issued
several days ago by the local union
officials and does not have the sane
tion of the national officials of tb«
United Mine Workers of America.
ON A VISIT TO THE CZAR
King Frederick of Denmark at 8t.
Petersburg.
St. Petersburg, July 16.—King Fred
erick of Denmark, accompanied by
Queen Louise and a royal suite, ar
rived at Peterbof on the Danish royal
yacht Daneborg. They were met by
&
PRE. ERICK Vill. 1
Emperor Nicholas, the two empresses
and the queen of Greece and wen'!
greeted heartily. The visit of Kin a
Frederick, which will last about a
week. Is a family affair.
BLAST FATAL TO SOLDIERS
Thres Men Will Die as Result of Pow
der Explosion.
Ckeyenne, Wyo., July 16.—The ex
plosion of 100 pounds of powder in
the barracks of Battery A at Fort
Russell injured seven soldiers, three
fatally, and destroyed the building.
The injured men were preparing blank
ammunition at the time of the explo
•too, tfes osus« of whlofc is unknown.
rgfedr-
88
-w v MS, ,*
MEMBER OF
j-jfo*
4"
*W/i
V
Ot'R MOTTO
x.
^HONEST CONCRETE1
W. G. MARQUART,
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
President*
SUIT CASES
$1.50 and $1.75 neat
looking and 1Q
durable. SPEC «pl«10
Entire line
of
Fancy Vests
up to $4-00 values ifl
Special 4) I I
CLOTHING
Our entire line of Men's and Young
Men's Summer Suits, strictly up-to
date, up to $18.00 values
Choice
$11.75
$20.00, $22.50 and $25.00 values
Choice
$16.00
50 Knee Pants Suits
Knickerbocker Pants, strictly up-to
date. In this lot you will find
nothing less than $3.00 values and
up to $5 values. Choice (T^
during the sale 4^*'
100 Pair Boy's Knee Pants OC.
up to 75c values. Choice OOC
JOS.HLNKIN, Prop.
Peter Marquart & Son
Cement Walks,
Foundations, Bridges,
Culverts, anything
and everything
in
Guaranteed Cement
Construction.
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
THE
Madison State Bank
MADISON, S.
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
E. J. COSTELLO
UNDERTAKER and EMBAIMB
Caskets and Funeral Supplies
Calls Answered Day or Night
Phone 114 MADISON, S. D.
a.
Phone Green 263
C. 4. fc&MNEDY,,
Vice President.
People past middle life usually have
some kidney or bladder disorder that
saps the vitality, which is naturally
lower ia old age. Foley's Kidney Rem
edy corrects urinary troubles, stimulates
the kidneys, and restores strength and
vigor. It cured uric acid troubles by
strengthening the kidneys so they will
Btrain out the uric acid that settles in
the muscles and joints causing
atism.—J. H. Anderson.
f-
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