OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, July 24, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-07-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

aeSWWBiaiSKBEEi.'SaVc
Royal Baking
!KANT REDUCTION
ALL ALONG LINE
Latest Move of Opponents of
Free Raw Material.
DISCRIMINATION CHARGED
Willing to Agree to Reduction on
Wool, Hides, Etc., but Propose to
Plght for Substantial Reductions on
Manufactured Products—President
Bombarded on All Sides by Con
flicting Interests on the Tariff.
Washington, July 24.—"We are go-
tag
to have a bill and soon," said
Senator Elkins of West Virginia after
a brief call at the White House.
All of the congressional callers at
the White House left the impression
that the president would win sufficient
concessions in his fight for downward
revision, especially on raw materials,
as to make it sure that a bill will be
devised which wllL warrant his signa
ture.
But the anti-free raw material sen
ators and representatives are still on
the firing line, devoting their energies
8ENATOR ELKINS.
now to a flank movement against the
schedule on manufactured and fin
ished products. If raw materials are
to be reduced almost to the extent of
putting them on the free list the
ators do not see why the same prin
eiple should not apply to finished
products. Facing defeat on those
items in which their constituents are
most concerned the anti-free raw ma
terial folk are anxious to show that
the other fellows had to suffer much
the same fate.
Elkinc Opposes Discrimination.
"I stand on the Republican plat
form and I am with the president,"
declared Senator Wlkins, "and this ap
plies to his pronouncement of Friday,
too." "So am I," interjected Senator
McCumber tf North Dakota, "but,"
they added in choru3, "we want to see
the revision called for in the platform
carried out without discrimination and
all along the Hue. Why should such
products as hides and oil be made
free and the rates on cotton and
woolen goods kept up so high you
can't reach them on a stepladder?"
"I have studied the bill pretty care
fully," raid Een itor licCumber, "and
I find stib^tautihl reductions every
where until we get. to the cotton and
woolrri sfcjjj ?fh$du!£*. Those goods
'&
^J4iw««-
am»
inci
as
£1*
^/Ibjolxxtely Txxre
The Only Raking Powder
made
from
Royal Grape Cream of Tartar
—made from Grapes—
Powder has not its
counterpart
home or abroad. Its qualities, which make the
food nutritious and healthful, are peculiar to itself
and are not constituent in other leavening agents.
.re i: i i: i,'..L home to tw.
i '-op',..
"in discussing this matter with the
president I went so far as to say that
we were willing to have a slight com
mensurate reduction made on raw
wool if we could get a reduction in
the woolen goods schedule."
The president has taken cognizance
of the situation as to cotton and wool
en goods and the senators who saw
bim reported that he had told them
to go ahead and see what could be
done looking to a reduction and he
added that he would do the same.
Report Expected Monday Night.
The president was told that a con
ference report might be expected by
Monday night. Congressional callers
brought news of the activity of Sen
ator Crane, who is using his abilities
as "the great conciliator of the sen
ate" to bring about a sentiment in
favor of the president's programme.
Some New England representatives
who have been fighting tooth and nail
for free hides have been stirred up by
the crossfire of the hide men, who
have demanded that the duties on
manufactured leather goods be de
creased accordingly. Representative
Gardner of Massachusetts hurried to
the White House to tell the president
that a reduction of duty on the class
of cheap shoes made in his district
would simply be ruinous to the indus
try. He declared that even the exist
ing rate—15 per cent—was far too
low. The trade In other districts, he
added, where a higher grade of men's
ehoes are made, might well afford a
reduction—he did not ksow as to that
—but he was sure as to his home dis
trict.
The president has been bombarded
on all sides by all the conflicting In
terests of the tariff. He listens pa
tiently to all that is said, but the calls
•f his visitors are Browing shorter
and shorter -ir the ('me go by.
NO TRACE OF MISSWfi MAN
Judge Clarkson Continues to Elude
8earchers.
Kenosha, Wis., July 24.—Judge Jos
eph R. Clarkson still continues to
elude every searcher that is sent out
to find him and while the search is
continued with increased vigor the
tievelopments are meager.
Some people seem to think it is pos
it ible the judge is trying a favorite
theory of his that it is an easy matter
for a man to lose his identity and be
lost to his friends just as long as he
ees fit.
Judgo Clarkson discussed this sub
ject with one of hifriends some time
tgo and the officials think It possible
that in one of his lapses of memory
he got to working on a theory of this
kind and hypnotized he is walking
through the country, but keeping out
of sight of every one who might give
any clue to his whereabouts.
MILLIONAIRE IS A LABORER
Student Dons Overalls in Plant Ha
Will Own Some Day.
New York, July 24.—Son of a multi
millionaire banker and heir to the
powerful Kean interests In New Jer
sey John Kean III., a Harvard senior,
is working as a laborer In the gas
plant of his uncle,Senator John Kean,
at Elizabeth, N. J.
Young Kean desires to get acquaint
ed with the business which he wiil
control later on.
ENCOUNTERING DIFFICULTIES
M. Briand May Not Accept French
Premiership.
Paris, July 24.—Aristlde Briand,
who was summoned to the Elysee pal
ace and charged -with the task of
forming a cabinet, is encountering dit
Acuities. In the event of M. Brland's
failure further efforts probably will
be made to Induce Leon Bourgeois,
the former premier and foreign min­|ment
ister. to accept the premiership.
he iflaftismt
at
PETROLEUM TO
GO ONJEE UST
Reduced Rates on Hides and
Other Raw Materials.
SIGN THAT END
IS
NEAR
Conferees Exclude ATt but Themselves
and Go Into Executive Session to
Consider Points in Dispute—Senate
Adjourns to Monday in Anticipation
of Receiving the Conf«#on«e Report
on That Day.
Washington, July 24.—The indlca
tions are very strong that the tariff
conference committee will report in
favor of the following rates on the
articles which have been the cause
of so much recent controversy:
Coal, 45 cents per ton iron ore, 25
cents hides, 7 per cent ad valorem
lumber, $1.25 per thousand petroleum,
free. There will be more opposition
to the hide reduction than to any
other of these adjustments.
The most striking sign of approach
ing quick and decisive action on the
tariff bill appeared when the confer
ence committee, going into session,
excluded the clerks and everybody
else except the conferees themselves
and went into strictly executive
INDIAN STUDENT MUST DIE
8layer of British Official Convicted at
London.
London. July 24.—Madarlal Dhina
gri, the Indian student who shot au
killed Lieutenant Colonel Sir William
Hutt Curzon Wyllie and Dr.
Caw as
Lalcaca, was found guilty and sen
tenced to death at the conclusion oi a
trial of less than an hour's duration
at the Old Bailey police court.
During the recital of the occur
rences at the Imjerial Institute on tin
night of the tragedy the prisoner s:i?
in the dock listening unconcerned 1
and only once broke his silence in
saying:
"Whatever I did was an act of pa
triotism."
As the lord chief Justice concluded
in pronouncing sentence the prisoner
drew himself up in military style end
saluted. He said:
"I thank you, my lord. 1 am proud
to have the honor of laying down my
humble life for my country.
Your
sentence of death is perfectly illegal.
You are all powerful and can do what
you like but, remember, wo will have
the power some time. That Is all I
have to say."
OF ALL KINDS AND SIZES
Roosevelt's Collection of Specimens
Numbers Several Thousand.
Nalvasha, B. E. A., July 24.—The
entire collection of specimens of the
Roosevelt expedition now numbers
2,000, covering mammals and birds of
all sizes. It also Includes several
thousand reptiles and Insects. Mr
Roosevelt's last bull hippopotamus,
which he shot recently In Lake Nai
vasha, measured fourteen feet.
Bond Issue Constitutl
St. Paul, July 24.—The state su
preme court, in a decision, holds that
the law passed by the last legislature
authorizing the state to issue certifi
cates of indebtedness to the amount
of $2,250,000 for the new state prison,
is valid and not contrary to the con
stitutional provision which prohibits
the issuance of bonds in excess of
$250,000.
Renounces Right to Throne,
Lisbon, July 24.—Prince Miguel of
Braganza, eldest son of Duke Michael,
the pretender to the Portuguese
throne, has renounced forever his
right to the throne of Portugal in
order to marry Miss Anita Stewart,
daughter of Mrs. James Henry Smith
of New York. The prince's engage
to Miss Stewart was announced
July ft.
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY, JIXY 24, 1909
ses­
sion.
It was understood that the commit
tee would now stick to their task un
til all the "big things" which have
given most trouble—iron, hides, coal,
lumber, wood pulp, print paper and
structural steel—are disposed of.
This confidence In the ability of the
conferees to get together was further
evidenced in adjournment of the sen
ate until Monday, instead of Tuesday
In the house Representative Dwight
(N. Y.), the Republican whip, ex
pressed the conviction that the con
ference report would be adopted by
the house If the report was brought in
on Tuesday. He declared that there
were sufficient votes pledged to can y
It through.
The conferees occupied much time
with the cotton schedule, but laid cot
ton aside temporarily to take up other
schedules. Assistant Secretary of the
Treasury Reynolds was called to the
conference in connection with this
schedule.
NEGOTIATIONS ARE RESUMED
Quiet Reigns in Tannery 8trike at
Kenosha, Wis.
Kenosha, Wis., July 24.—Negotia
tions for settlement of the strike at
the tannery of N. R. Allen's Sons
company, which were Interrupted by
rioting, have been resumed. Indica
tions point to an early ending of the
Strike.
Peace reigns about the big plant.
Officials of the company and city and
county authorities appeared relieved
that the night had failed to bring
forth new hostilities on the part of
the strikers.
A heavy guard of police agd deputy
sheriffs was maintained about the
premises throughout the day.
The strike committee later met the
company officers and presented de
mands which inclined an increase of
$1 a week for all strikers, discharge
of the men who continued at work,
pay for all time lost through the strike
and the release of the men under ar
rest. These terms the company flatly
refused except as to the wage in
crcnpr
AMERICAN MINISTER
WORKS FOR PEACE
Efforts to Avoid Conflict Be
tween Peru and Bolivia.
Buenos Ayres, July 24.—Frsquent
conferences are being held between
the minister of foreign affairs and the
ministers of the I'nited States and
Peru. It is hoped to avoid a conflict
between Peru and Bolivia by securing
direct negotiations between these
countries looking towards a definite
adjustment of the boundary contro
versy. It is maintained, however, that
in any event Bolivia should first rec
ognize the arbitration award made by
the president of the Argentine Repub
lic and also give Argentina adequate
satisfaction for recent indignities.
After Bolivia has taken this prelim
inary action it will remain for Bolivia
and Peru to take up the
boundary
question further and adjust It accord
ing to their desires.
IF IT IS HONESTLY ACQUIRED
Aocumulstion of Wealth Should Not
Cause Prejudice.
Marinette, Wis., July 24.—Associate
Justice Brewer gave out an interview
here on the tendency and problems of
the day.
"The building up of great fortunes
is not strange," he said, "when busi
ness transactions can be arranged by
£OMrAiG*r*r i
JUSTICE BREWER.
telephone and telegraph to all parts
of the land and to all parts of the
world. But the accumulation of
wealth, if honestly made, ought not to
create any prejudice. One duty which
really rests upon men who have ac
quired wealth honestly is to recognize
the fact that they owe to the public
the moral duty of using some portion
of their wealth for the public good."
SCORE OF WORKMEN KILLED
Building In Course of Construction
Collapses.
St. Petersburg, July 24.—Twenty
workmen were killed and a large num
ber injured by the collapse of a build
ing in course of construction on Ra
syesshaya street.
Another score of workmen are miss
ing and it is believed they are buried
in the ruins.
Cannon's Nephew In Wreok.
Danville, III., July 24.—A motor car
driven by Richard Cannon, a nephew
of Speaker Cannon of the house of
representatives, dashed over an em
bankment while running at high
speed near Crawfordsvllle, Ind., and
upturned in a ditch. Cannon's corn
panion. John Noon, a brewer of this
city, was crushed under the car and
will probably dio. Cannon was pain
fully bruised.
CORNELIUS SHEA
GOES TOj'RISON
Given Term ot From Five to
Twenty*five Years.
JUDGE SCORES PRISONER
Former President of International
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Con
victed of Attempt to Murder Wo
man, Is Denounced as an Enemy to
Organized Labor BMSUSO of Hi
Brutal Methods.
New York, July 24.—Cornelius
8hea, the former Chicago labor lead
er, who was found guilty on Wednc
day of attempting to murdt* Alio
Walsh, a former Chicago waitre^
with whom he had been living her*
was sentenced to not less than
five
nor more than twenty-five years in
prison. The former president of
tie
International Brotherhood of Team
sters listened stolidly to Judge Fos
ter's scathing remarks In pronouncing
sentence.
"Your services for humanity are
urged here In your behalf," Bald the
court, "because you have been active
in the affairs of organized labor. I
brieve in the right of labor to or
ganize, but there is a prejudice In this
community, and we must admit its ex
istence, agafeist organized labor,
lie-
cause such men as you dominate i!
with your brutal methods and your
coarse, offensive personality, and i
part of the community has come
look upon organized labor as belmr
composed of brutes and securing th(
victories by brutal methods. But th
is all wrong. I believe I am helpii
the cause of organized labor by rM
ding It of one such as you and sec!
Ing you to state's prison.*
DAUGHTER DENIES CHARGE
Under Arrest for Alleged Shooting of
Her Mother.
Chicago. July 24.—Mrs. Agnes v..
Mayfleld. wife of a mining promoi'
of Maplmi. Me*., who Is under arn -i
in connection with the mysterious
shooting of her mother, Mrs. Gertrude
A. Hinkley. spent the night In a rock
ing chair at the police station.
Mrs. Hinkley's statement that th.
bullet, which entered her neck and
came out through her mouth, was
fired by her daughter is vigorously
denied by Mrs. Mayfleld.
"My mother's whole story Is rldi
ulous," said the prisoner. "I came
Chicago from Mexico to give her sto k
in the mining company, not to sell it
to l»r. As a matter of fact my moth
either accidentally shot herself whil
planning to meet me or tried to oam
mit suicide."
REPORT OF CONCILIATORS
Refuses to Recommend Recognition
of Mine Workers.
Halifax, N. 8., July 24.—The go\
eminent conciliation board refuses ti
recommend recognition of the
Unite*
Mine Workers of America in its n
port on the labor differences at tin
collieries at Spring Hill. The
United
Mine Workers demanded recognition,
while the company maintained that it
should not be required to help sup
port a foreign labor organization, th
main body of whose members are
working in the production of coal com
peting with the Nova Scotia product
in the Canadian market.
The conciliation board, In its re
port, says that it feels that it should
not express an opinion as to
sueh
recognition, but that the matter ought
to be left to the»discretion of th
company.
Will Extend Convention Rates.
Chicago, July^ 24.—The Western
railroads have decided to extend
through November and December th*
basis agreed upoij for rates to con
vent ions and similar gatherings east
of the Missouri river up to Oct. 31.
The uniform rates for meetings where
the attendance is 1,000 or over, on
the certificate plan, is a fare and a
half for the round trip.
King Peter in Poor HesMlk
Vienna, July 24.—Private telegrams
from Belgrade, Servia, say that the
condition of King Peter is arousing
much anxiety. His majesty is suffer
ing from calcination of the arteries,
complicated by Inflammation of the
veins. At night he Is almost sleep
less and his suddon death, the Bel
grade advices say, would cause no sur*
prise.
Harrtman Greatly Improved.
New York, July 24.—Dr. G. A. Dix
on, E. H. Harriman's physician, who
has Just arrived from abroad, said
that Mr. Hairlinan's health had great
ly improved since he went to Europe
and that the financier was In |0«d
condition when he loll
htm
tastaln. Austria.
a
TWO WAYS
OF DOING BUSINESS
Some merchants pride themselves by charg
ing the SAME OLD PRICES fortheSAME
OLD GOODS regardless whether at the be
ginning or at the end of the season.
This old method of merchandising
biHSMp-fS-tlCficTEffl
W. G. MARQUART,
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
President
—THE
Madison State Bank
MADISON, S. 0
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
WHITESLAVES ON CANALZ0NE
Army Officer 8ays Their Life Makes
Heart Bleed.
Now York, July 24.—A plea for sup
pression of the "white slave" traffic
between the United States and the
canal zone is made in a letter from
Second Lieutenant C. W. Barber, Sec
ond United States Infantry, the sec
ond assistant chief of police of the
canal zone. Lieutenant Barber de
clares that mnny American girls, eppe
elally actresses, have been lured to
Panama and "tho life they lead there
would make your heart bleed."
Jerome to Attend Thaw Hearing.
Poughkeepsie, N. Y.. July 24.—It
has been practically decided that Dls
trlct Attorney Jerome of New York
eoun'y will be called into the Thaw
case when the hearings are resumed
at White l'lairs next Monday. Mr.
Jerome will conduct the cross-exam
I ination of Thaw when h*
stand.
COM
wsi
Oess 25 years ago. With the present PUSH
and VIM no up-to-date merchant can afford
to carry over unseasonable goods, even if he
has to sacrifice profits.
WE ARE DOING IT RIGHT NOW.
Attend Onr July Clearance Sale.
You can save from 20% to 40% on your
aurchoses. Just drop in and convince your
e
Hake (jk6lflthinqi£ff.
JOS.HLNK1N. Prop
Peter Marquart &
MEMBER OF
ro
nt4*
Cement Walks,
Foundations, Bridges,
Culverts, anything
and everything
Guaranteed Cement
Construction.
=SEE=«=
.4
Son
263
Phone Green
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
C. KENNEDY,.
¥ice President
No
Question
as to the
5uperiority
of
on ti»
E. J. COSTELLO
UNDERTAKER aai
••.
&
'4
I
$
yl
A
CALUMET
Baking
Powder
Receive! Highest Awarl
WecU'e PereFeed E
Chfcacs. 1907.
$
•!P|
fHBALMtt
Caskets and Funeral Supplies
Calls Answered Day or Night
re 114 MADISON,S. D.
,**4
'4
1
k
1
W
1
$1
'r ^'"*4

xml | txt