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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, July 27, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-07-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Royal Baking Powder
Assisting State in Hearing
at
White Plains.
COURT 6RANTS PERMISSION
Counsel for Plaintiff Objected to Pres
ence of New York District Attorney,
but Is Overruled—Siayer of Stan
ford White Faces Trying Ordeal
When He Takes the Stand ta Kffort
CO Prove His Sanity.
White Plains, N. Y., July 27.—The
severest ordeal of Harry K. Thaw's
struggle for freedom from the Mat
teawan asylum for the criminal insane
was before him when Justice Isaac X.
Mills of the supreme court recom
menced the hearing at which Thaw is
trying to show himself sane. Charles
Morschauscr, Thaw's attorney, reaf
firmed an intention of putting Thaw
on the stand to give personal proof
of Thaw's sound mental condition.
District Attorney Jerome, who last
week announced his intention of help
ing the state and the Westchester
county authorities, was present.
When the hearing of the case was
resumed fJeputy Attorney General
Roger Clark, who, on behalf of the
state, is opposing Thaw's application.
Aft fewwr
WILLIAM JEROME.
called Justice Mills' attention to Mr.
Jerome's presence, saying that Mr.
Jerome had consented to appear with
the state's attorneys at their request
Thaw's attorney immediately ob
jected to Jerome's participation and
recalled the New York district attor
ney's affidavit before Judge Gaynor
when an effort was made to hold th
present hearing In New York instead
of White Plains. The affidavit was
to the effect that Mr. Jerome could
not act with the authorities of West
chester county. Justice Mills settled
the matter by remarking that Jerome
had never said he would not appear
at the request of the state and Mr
Jerome remained.
Expert testimony began with the
first witness, Dr. Henry Ernst
Sclimid o White Plains. Dr
Schmid'g conclusions, after numerous
examination of Thaw in White Plains
was that Thaw's condition, both men
tal and physical, was normal, except
lng his heart, which beat a trifle too
fast
Baking
Powder
The Only Baking Powder
made from
Royal Grape Cream of Tartar
—made from Grapes-
has
1
^/Ibsolutely Ture
not its counterpart at
home or abroad. Its qualities, which make the
food nutritious and healthful, are peculiar to itself
and are not constituent in other leavening agents.
JEROME APPEARS
IN THAW CASE
ITRUUBLE AT M'KEES ROCKS
Deputies on Guard Fire on Party At*
tacking Water Plant.
Pittsburg, July 27.—Deputy sheriffs
en guard along the Ohio river bank
rear the Pressed Steel Car company's
water plant at McKees Rocks fired on
:m attacking party at night in an
swer to stones and other missiles
hurled by several men in a rowboat.
One man is reported to have been
shot, but no trace of him can be
found. The object of the attack at
the water plant is unknown.
Rumors of the importation of now
men as employed at the plant caused
the strikers to establish picket lines as
early as 4 a. m. and for three hours
all street cars were halted while a
committee questioned each passenger.
The state constabulary was ailed out
but had little trouble in dispersing the
crowds. There are no additional men
at work.
BLER10T HERO OF
HOUR IN ENGLAND
French Aviator Center of En
thusiastic Crowds.
London, July 27.— Louis Blerlot, the
Frenchman who made history by fly
lng across the English channel from
Les Baraques to Dover, a distance of
twenty-one miles In the remarkable
time of a little less than half an hour
and his famous little monoplane have
reached London, the former to receive
the monetary fruits of his achieve
ment in the shape of a cheek for fS,
000 and the latter to be placed on ex
hibition to the financial advantage oi
both a London hospital and the en
torprising proprietor of the only
American department store here. Tht
famous aviator Is finding hero wor
ship much more trying to endure than
the strain of navigating the air.
Remarkable scenes were witnessed
at Dover when M. Blerlot returned
there to attend a civil reception in his
honor. The Frenchman was mobbed
by the enormous crowds and the po
lice had to come to his protection, s
eager were the enthusiasts to greet
him at close quarters.
A similar ovation awaited the avi
ator at London, his compatriots hav
lng gathered at Victoria station in
huge numbers. With the help of the
police he finally succeeded in getting
away and reached his hotel, where he
was presented with the check at
luncheon party.
PASSING OF NOTED PEOPLE
MISS JOS1E POMFRET, one of th
claimants to the $17,000,000 Pomfret
estate in England, is dead at the conn
ty poor farm at Independence, Mo
Miss Pomfret was a former newspa
per woman of Chicago and Cincinnati
REV. WILLIAM R. HUNTINGTON
rector of Grace Episcopal chinch, New
York city, is dead at Nahant. Masa
after a lingering illness caused by In
testinal troubles. He was seventy
one years oM
Advance in Wire Produeta.
New York, July 27.—Notice of at)
advance of $2 a ton in wire products
to take effect Aug. 1, was given by
the American Steel and Wire com
pany, a subsidiary of the United
State* Steel corporation.
Wrights Honored by France.
Paris, July 27.—Orvllle and WUbu
Wright, the American aeroplanists of
Dayton, O., and Henry Farman, the
English aeronaut, have been decorat
ed with the Legion of Honor for thote
achievements In avlatiom.
TAFT'S MESSAGE
MAY BEUSELESS
Appealed to Chinese Regent
on Behalf of Bankers.
GERMAN INFLUENCE GREAT
British, French and German Bankers
Applying Pressure to Induce China
to Stick to the Original Loan Agree­
ment—American Charge at Peking
Warns British Minister There That
Present Methods Must Cease.
Peking, July 27.—The success of
President Taft's telegram sent about
week ago to Prince Chun, the Chi
nese regent, with the purpose, It Is
understood here, of tying the hands of
Grand Councillor Chang Chi Tung in
the matter of American claim for
equal participation in the Hankow
Szechuen railroad loan of $27,500,000,
appears doubtful. The Chinese for
eign board is unable to vouch
MADISON, SOITTM DAKOTA, Tl'ESDAY, JIXY 27, 1909
for
Chang Chi Tung's actions and fears
that he will memorialize the throne
In favor of the original loan agree
ment, thereby forcing the prince re
ent to decide between Himself and
the risk of losing American friend
ship.
Following their unacceptable offer
to America during the meetings of
the international bankers in London,
when the European bankers offered to
the American representatives a quar
ter of the Hupeh section of the loan,
the British, German and French bank
ers here are
Using the American Refuaai
for the purpose of putting the re
sponsibility for the failure of a four
sidtd agreement on America, and with
this object in view are adroitly press
ing ChTna through the German bank 3.
The tripartite banks are taking full
benefit of the Influence that the Ger
mans acquired over Chang Chi Tung
by undermining the British and
French bankers last March, when
China accepted a German loan of $15,
00(1,000 for the Yangtse section of the
Canton-Hankow railway, and are using
it tor the purpose of applying pres
sure to China's structural weakness.
In view of this the result will be
either the rejection of America's claim
or the dismissal of Chang Chi Tung.
Henry P. Fletcher, American charge
d'affaires at Peking, has warned Sir
John N. Jordan, the British minister
at Peking, and also the British bank
that the American government
will
understand a continuation of pressure
on Chang Chi Tung to mean that it Is
sanctioned by Great Britain.
PLUNGES INTO THE FLAMES
Farmer Fires Barn and Then Ends
His Life.
Jackson, Minn., July 27.—August
Huebner, sixty years old, who lived
twelve miles west of Jackson, com
mitted suicide by setting his barn
afire and then plunging into the
flames.
Huebner and his wife had quarreled
and Mrs. Huebner locked herself In
the house with her children. When
Huebner attempted to gain admit
tance to the house and discovered that
the door was locked he seized an ax
and smashed the door. Then he dis
appeared. Mrs. Huebner and the
children then fled to a neighbor's
house and on their way noticed thai
the barn was ablaze. When Hueb
ner's body was found the head and
limbs were charred.
TO ESCAPE WEARY GRIND
8uiefdo Club of Disheartened Factory
Employes.
Cleveland, July 27.—A club com
posed of disheartened factory em
ployes, advocating suicide as the only
means within their reach of attaining
the peace of mind they crave and to
escape the torments of their daily
grind, is believed to exist here. This
fact was advanced by the parents of
Miss Rebecca Bosechek, eighteen
years old, who was foui dead in Gor
don park. After considering all of the
known circumstances surrounding hei
death this is the only theory evolved.
Relatives believe that another girl,
a companion of Miss Bosechek, will
commit suicide within the next few
days. According to those who know
of the habits of Miss Bosechek the
club consisted of six girls, four young
men and a man and his wife.
Kills Wife, Then Ends Life.
New Bedford, Mass., July 27.—After
showing a letter declaring himself a
wife murderer Robert M. Fanning of
Westport shot and killed himself In a
police station here. The police later
found the horribly mutilated body of
his wife where he had directed. Fan
ning^ father Is said to be a wealthy
manufacturer In Providence, R. I,
HOPE TO CARRY THE STATE
Virginia Republicans to Work Out
President Taft'e Idea.
Newport News, Va., July i!7.—En
couraged by President Taft's desire
for an active opposition in the South
Virginia Republican leaders are de
termined to fcegin, P.t the state con
vention whicji will be held here July
28 and 2ft, the work of buildinr up an
organization In the hope of a Repub
lican victory In Virginia at the next
Rational election.
Aside from being the first Repub
lican state convention under the Taft
administration this gathering will lay
claim to national attention through
the presence of one of the Tatt cab
inet officers, Secretary Nagel of tho
department of commerce and labor,
who will address the delegates Wed
nesday night.
NEGRO ^OOPJTWELCOIVIED
Fighting Tenth Cavalry Returns From
Philippines.
New York, July 27.—Back from two
years' service in the Philippines and
led by Major General Leonard Wood,
commanding the department of the
East, the colored trdbpers of the fight
ing Tenth, the cavalry regiment which
won a reputation for bravery in the
COPY/?/
iBY PACH BROS. NX
GLN&RAi.
LfcQ.\ARD WQQD.
historic charge up San Juan hill, drew
busy Broadway from the customary
routine for a time while they marched
up that thoroughfare from the trans
port Kilpatrick to the Sixty-ninth regi
ment armory.
Crowds lined the curbs along the
route and cheered tho dusky regulars,
as, headed by the citizens' committee
of negroes, they marched proudly to
the lively martial music of their splen
did band. At City Hall park Mayor
McClellan and other city officials re
viewed them. Then, resuming their
march, they proceeded up town. Ev
erywhere a hearty greeting was given
the soldiers.
BOOM ROOSEVELT FOR MAYOR
Anti-Tammanyite6 Hope He Will Be
a Candidate.
New York, July 26.—The views of
Jobs 8. Wise, Jr., as cabled from
Paris, on the possibility of former
President Roosevelt entering the New
York mayoralty campaign this fall,
are In line- with a report circulated
here last spring and again within the
last few weeks. Colonel Roosevelt's
friends in the local Republican ranks
have long had him in mind as a can
dldate.
The opinion was expressed In Influ
entlal circles In the ranks of the oppo
sltion to the present city administra
tlon that If Colonel Roosevelt wanted
to run for mayor it would be difficult
to keep the nomination away from
him.
NOVEL CASE OF MAN
WITHOUTAJJOUNTRY
Must Continue To Cross Ocean
Until Matter Is Settlor
New York, July 26.—George How
ard, a burly middle aged negro, has
sailed on the White 8tar steamer Ara
bic fo» Liverpool a man without
country. The authorities in England
will probably send him back and as
this country has deported him as an
undesirable alien It will refuse to re
ceive him.
Howard arrived here on the Arabic
a week ago. He had just left an Eng
Msb prison and as he claimed Amer
lean citizenship the British author!
ties sent him over. On this side
special board of Inquiry decided that
his claims of citizenship were un
founded and ordered his deportation,
Ellis island officials say Howard's
ease is without a parallel and that he
will at least have to remain a third
class passenger on the Arabic until
tho two government* unwind mooh
rod tape.
PREPARING
FOR
BITTE8D0NTEST
Anti°Free Hide Element in
Congress Active.
VARIOUS PLANS PROPOSED
"Hope to Defeat Conference Report by
Aid of Democratic Vote6 in a Novel
Manner—Fight on Question Prom
ises to Be Decidedly Close in Both
Houses, but tho Outoomo Continues
In Doubt.
Washington, July 27—In both sen
ate and house tho anti-free hide ele
ment Is making active preparations
for most vigorous resistance to any
report from the tarlfT conference com
mitteee looking to taking the duty
off hides. Northwestern senators and
members of the house were at the
Capitol early and from the moment of
their arrival all of them were busily
engaged la conferences
among
them-
telves.
In case the conferees brought in a
free hide report the opposition will re
sort to adopting a resolution of au
thorization to the conference commit
tee to place all kinds of leather and all
leather goods on the free list. This
plan will not be resorted to because
it is preferred to make these articles
free, but because success Is regarded
as more probable If this policy is fol
lowed than if an attempt should be
ie to instruct the committee to
place a duty on hides.
By the formor course tho opposi
tion count on obtaining all but one of
the Democratic votes in the senate
and all but four of the Democratic
votes in the house. While the Demo
crats would not directly help the hide
men by voting to put a higher duty
on hides the Democrats would be will
ing to force all the duty off shoes.
The hide men think that rather
than accept free leather and free
shoos the manufacturers and those
conferees who represent the manu
facturers' views would be willing to
concede a duty on hides.
Close Fight in Both Houaaa.
The fighting will be close In both
houses. In the senate there are sixty
one Republicans and thirty-one Demo
crats. Senator McEnery of the Demo
cratic column will vote with the Re
publicans for protection. The other
thirty Democrats are counted upon as
favorable to free leather. With these
thirty votes as a r.tarter it would be
necessary to get seventeen Republi
can votes. There is some doubt as to
whether this result could be accom
plished. There nre about ten senators
who will go to any necessary extern
to prevent the taking of the duty off
hides. The ten hope tc pick up six or
seven votes from among the so-called
progressive senators, who voted
against the bill as it passed the sen
ate They have the sympathy of sen
ators representing states producing
other raw material than hides and
they hope for some votes from them.
In the house theie has been no di
vision among the raw material repre
sent ati\es so far and the dutiable hide
men have been left to make their
fight alone. There were almost fifty
of the original anti-free raw material
"insurreetos" and if any of them have
fallen away the fact has not been re
ported to the leaders. They also ex
pect many of the original house "in
surrectionists" to vcte against a rule
for a vote on the conference report
and count upon picking up a number
of j-tray votes for other reasons.
Everybody appreciates that the tar
iff bill Is In a critical state and not
even its most enthusiastic supporters
nre as hopeful over the outlook as
they were a week ago.
SEVEN ARE KILLED IN WRECK
Part Of* Wabash Train Plunges Into
Missouri River.
Kansas City, July 27 —Seven po»
sons were '-tilled and three perhaps
fatally injured In the wreck of Wa
barh passenger train No. 4 when it
plunged into the Missouri river thirty
miles east of here.
Of the eight cars which made up
the train five and the engine are in
the river, with the water covering ail
of them except ona end ot the Den
Moines sleeker. A dead-head Pull
man, mall, baggage, day coach and
sleeper followed the engine into the
stream. The chair car and two Pull
mans alone remained uninjured.
Eight mail clerks were saved be
cause the roof of their car was torn
off, permitting them to get out on top
of the car and swim to the shore.
Because Wife Sought Divorce.
Los Angeles, Cal., July 26 —Worried
over his wife's determination to press
her divorce suit Walter Wright, mem
ber of a wealthy Chicago family, at
tempted suicide here In a private
hospital by slashing his wrists.
Butler (Pa.)
TWO WAYS
OF DOING BUSINESS
Some merchants pride themselves by charg
ing the SAM E OLD PRICKS for the SAME
OLD GOODS regardless whether at the be
ginning or at the end of the season.
This old method of merchandising WlMMf
cess 25 years ago. With the present PUSH
and VIM no up-to-date merchant car. aflord
to carry over unseasonable goods, even if he
has to sacrifice profits,
WE ARE DOING IT RIGHT NOW.
Attend Our July Clearance Sale.
You can save from 20% to 40% on vour
nurchoset. iust drop in and convince your
s e
JOS.HLNKIN. Prop.
Peter Marquart & Son
MEMBER OF
nflW
HCNE5T CONCRETE
W. G. MARQUART, Phon'
CHAS, B. KENNEDY
Steel
Cement Walks,
Foundations, Bridges,
Culverts, anythiiqf
and everything
la
Guaranteed Cement
Construction.
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
PNakldtf
—THE
Madison State Bank
WIADISON, S. 0
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
AT THE COMPANY'S TERMS
Plant Strikers
Re­
turn to Work.
Pittsburg, July 27.—The strike at
the Standard Steel Car company
plant in Butler, Pa., has ended. Mr re
than 2 000 former employes returner
to work n* the company's term
Seven leaders of the strike movement
were discharged.
Officials of the company say that
hereafter American workmen will le
given preference in all department*,
particularly In Ike const roctk* of
cars.
NO ONE SERIOUSLY INJURED
Canadian Village of Macklin Wiped
Out by Cyclone.
Winnipeg. July 27.—The village oi
Macklin. located on the SaBltatoon and
Wetaskiwin branch of the Canadian
Pacific railway in SasKatchevvan was
wiped out by a cyclone. Only two
Btores remain standing. No one was
seriously hurt. Several settlers'
houses in the path ofthe storm also
were destroyed.
Green 2g3
C. KENNEDY,*
Vice President
No
Question
as to the
Superiority
of
CALUMET
Baking Powder
Received Higkest Award
PuVFm4Exp
Ckufi, 1907.
E. J. COSTELLO
UNDERTAKER ami EMBAtMtt
Caskets and Funeral Supplies
Calk Answered Day or Night
Phone
114 MADISON, S. D.
.*«
$

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