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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, July 29, 1909, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-07-29/ed-1/seq-4/

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V
le
\r ir
Sudweiser
SB
iMtkd Only at Ihm
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St. Louis, U. S. A.
Or.
•V
V
CORKED OR WITH CROWN CAPS
1HE COiilG RELIGION
Eliot Siys Neither Creed Nor
Dogma Will Bind It
1
PREVENTION ITS WATCHWORD
I
|wwrstowi
of Now Mfif, 9ays
Harvard's President Emeritus, Will
Love of God and Service to Fel
low Men—Skillful Surgeon to Be
©ne of Its Ministers.
«.fihnrles W. HI lot. president emeritus
of Harvard university, outlined In an
address before the Harvard Summer
School of Theolopy nt Cambridge,
Mass., the other afternoon his Idea of
the new religion—that of the twentieth
century—a religion not based upon au
thority or dealing in promises of future
comiM'iisntions, a religion among whose
mlulHterg would bo the skillful sur
geon, whose aim would be prevention,
not consolation.
**You have been studying this year,"
Mid !r. Elliot, "about changed views
of religion and Increased knowledge,
new Ideas of God as seen along many
lines. You have learned that social
progress has been modified and that
energy Is being conserved. From
these and other Indications you must
believe that religion Is not fixed, but
fluent, and that It changes from cen
tury to century. Such, Indeed, has
been the case.
"The progress In the nineteenth cen
tury far outstripped that of similar
periods, and it is fair to assume that
the progress of the twentieth century
will bring about what I call the new
religion. First, I shall tell you what
this new religion will not be, and. sec
ond. what it will be.
He Faith Not to Be Racial or Tribal.
•The new religion will not be based
upon authority, either spiritual or tem
poral. The present generation is ready
to le led, but not driven. As a rule,
the older Christian churches have re
lied on authority. But there is now
a tendency toward liberty and prog
ress, and among educated men this
feeling is irresistible. In the new re
ligion there will be no personitkation
of natural objects. There will be no
dedication of remarkable human be
IB«8, and the faith will not be racial
or tribal.
The nctr rcilgtea wilt noil afford
safety primarily to the Individual it
will think firct of the common good
and will not ".each that character can
bo changed quickly.
The new religion will not think of
Qod as a large aud glorified man or as
a king or a patriarch. It will not deal
chiefly with sorrow and death, but
with Joy and life, it will believe In
no malignant powers, and It will at
tack quickly all forms of evil.
"A new thought of God will be its
characteristic. The twentieth century
tJnwJSF* AwMiWr
I5*.. V
i
frien
Our Inherited Love of Mother Nature
Has bred within our blood and bone the strength to make us a nation of conquerors and
the leaders of the world's civilization.
From the dawn of spring until old Jack Frost first covers our land there will be
thousands of camps pitched along the pine-clad rivers and lakes of our beloved country.
No camping outfit is complete without a case or two of good old
Budweiser
The King of All Bottled Beers
This matchless brew holds in living life the juices of the best barley grown in America,
mid the fragrance and tunic powers of the finest Saazer hups grown in Bohemia.
The Most Popular Beer in the World
statement, 'In him we live and move
and have our being.' This new re
ligion
will be thoroughly monotheistic.
God will be so imminent that no Inter
mediary will be needed. For every
man God will be a multiplication of
Infinities. A humane and worthy idea
of God then will I*? the central thought
of the new rellglou.
"This religion rejects the Idea that
man is alien or a fallen being who is
hopelessly wicked, it finds audi be
liefs inconsistent with a worthy Idea
of G«d. Man has always attributed to
man a spirit associated with but Inde
pendent of the body. This spirit is
shown in a man's habits. In Ills appear
ance aud actions—In short. It Is his
personality it is the most effective
part of every human being. In the
crisis of a battle ft is a superior soul
that rallies the troops, and it appeals
to souls, not to hodies.
Will Reduce Need of Consolation.
"The new religiou will admit no sac
raments. except natural, hallowed cus
toms, ntul it will deal with natural in
terpretations of such rites, its priests
will strive to improve social and in
dustrial conditions. It will not at
tempt to reconcile people to present
ills by the promise of future compensa
tion. I believe the advent of just free
dom for mankind has been delayed for
centuries by such promises. Preven
tion will be the watchword of the new
religion, and a skillful surgeon will IK?
one of its ministers. It cannot supply
consolation as offered by old religious,
but it will reduce the need of consola
tion.
Limitless Field of Action.
"The new religion will laud God's
love and will not teach condemnation
for the mass of mankind. The true
end of all religions and philosophy is
to teach man to serve his fellow man,
and this religion will do this Increas
ingly. It win not bo bound by dogma
or creed. Its workings will be simple,
but its field of action limitless. Its
discipline will be the training In the
development of co-operative good will.
"Again and again different bodies
of people, such as spiritualists aud
Christian Scientists, have set up new
cults. Hut the mass of peoplo stay by
the church. Since there will be un
doubtedly more freedom In this cen
tury It may be argued that It will b«
difficult to unite various religions un
der this new head, but such unity, I
believe, can be accomplished on this
basis the love of God and service tc
one's fellow man. There are already
many sigjis of extensive co-operation—
democracy, individualism, idealism, a
tendency to welcome the new, and pre
ventive medicine. Finally, I believe,
the new religion will make Christ's
revelation seem more wonderful than
mm to us."
tlx Passengers Injur*#,
1$es Moines, July 29.—Six passcn
gers on the Chicago and Northwestern
passenger train were injured in a col
lition between that train and a freight
train four miles south of Ames
Hf.ir.iiii at- Pmii'a There wore no fatalities.
W***
4fcv A*.**
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Distributor
MADISON. S. Dw
IMPROVE
Klrksville (Mo.) Agronomist Trying to
Make a Cross With Alfalfa.
Professor Harry Laughlln of the de
partment of agriculture of the normal
school at Klrksville, Mo., is conduct
ing an interesting experiment this
summer in Tossing alfalfa clover with
the old and worthless wild clover that
grows so bountifully In some of the
wild fields and corners of Adair coun
ty, Mo.
The cross Is being made by grafting
some of the alfalfa buds on the wild
clover stems, and It Is said by Profess
or Laughlln and the students who are
making the experiment that a newer
and finer species of clover is being
produced. They believe that the new
hybrid may become very valuable to
feeders.
"It is widely known." said Professor
Laughlln, "that the wild clover has a
very bitter leaf and will not be eaten
by cows or horses. We believe that
we can breed this bitterness out of
the wild clover and produce a new
variety that will lie much hardier than
the ordinary clover and will be pecul
iarly adapted to Missouri soil and Mis
souri climate."
HUMAN TENPINS.
Summer Game In Great Vogua at Eu
ropean Resorts.
The French of the iiiviera have in
vented a uew game for the Coney
Islanders. It is the game of human
tenpins. The game is having a great
vogue at the resorts along the Medi
terranean and at Italian and Austrian
summer gardens.
In playing the game the players
themselves take the place of balls and
knock down the pins, which are huge
wicker affairs made in the shape of
the regulation bowling pins.
The balls are big wicker baskets,
capable of holding two persons, which
are sent along the alley catapult fash
ion, or else the alley Is built as an in
clined plane and the baskets slld»
down Into the grouped pins and upsel
them. The game is counted in th
usual way.
One of the St. Louis summer gar
dens has applied to the Inventor foi
the privilege of operating a human
tenpln alley next season.
Barefoot Croquet to Cure N*rv*usness.
Many persons iu England now find
pleasure aud possibly profit in play
ing croquet with the feet bare, not, as
might be imagined, in more or less
primitive fashion on the sands of the
seashore, but on the well kept lawn of
the country house, to say nothing of
that of the suburban villa. All those
who have played the game with ban
feet praise the method highly, saying
that the naked foot lias a far better
grip on the turf than the foot that
rests on a sole of leather or India rub
ber. It is further urged that the touch
of the soles of the feet against the
earth has a soothing effect upon the
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICES
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, July 2£.—Wheat—Jaly
fl.25 Sept., $1.06% ft 1.06^4 Dec.
$1.04%. On track—No. 1 hard, $1.
zS«4 No. 1 Northern, $1.27*4 No. S
Northern, $1.26% No. S Northern, |L
22%© 1.23%.
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Many a Mother in
Will Appreciate
Following.
CLOVER.
1
Duluth, July 2H.—Wheat—On track
—No. 1 hard. $1.32 No. 1 Northern
$1.MU,: No. 2 Northern, $1.2*V4 July.
$1.29H: Sept., $1.06% Dec., $1.03%.
Flax—To arrive, $1.48% on track.
$1.4S July, $1.47 Sept., $1.41% Oct
$137.
St. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul, July 2S.—Cattie—Good to
choice Bt^ors, $'».r0(f|6.50 fair to good
$4 ..r)0(f/ O.r.o, good to choice cows and
hoifcrs, $4.25ffr r.2" voals. $5.7Vc!fi.f»0.
Hops—$7.25 ft 7.50. Sheoi—Wethers,
$4.75^ 5.25 yearlings*, $5.25(Fi 5.75
lambs. |[email protected] spring lambs, $7.
00£T7.76.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, July 28.—Wheat—July, $1.
W Sept., $1.05H Dec., $1.01% May.
$1.071X(. Corn—July, 71c: Sept.,fi6%c
Dec., 55%o May, 5fiVift 66%c. Oat^
—July, 45c Sept., 3'J%(?i39Hc Dec.,
3f)^c May, 42MtC. Butter—Cream
eries. 32^(6 3^ dairies, 20T/23c.
Eggs—lSffj^MjC. Poultry—Turkeys,
14c chickens, 13M»c springs, 16®
17c
Chicago Union Stock Yard*.
Chicago, July 28.—Cattle—Beeves.
94.35S7.40 Texas steers, [email protected]
Western steers, $4.00Si6.25 stockers
and feeders, $3.00frii.10 cows and
heifers, $2.20ft r.10 calves, $f.50ffi
8.00. Hogs—Light, $7.45(^ 7.90 mixed,
$7.3.*.^7.95 heavy $7.30^/8.00 rough,
$7.30^x7.45 good to choice heavy,
$7.45?p8.ft0 plgr,, lo.Tfl® 7.80. Sheep
—Native, $3.00f?.•.2.* Western, $3.00
yearlings, I4.b0fr6.00 lambs,
$4.5007.75.
HOTHBR'SGRATITUDE
Remember the name—Doan's—and
take no other.
SIMPLE REMEDY FOB I*A GRIPPE
La (irippe coughs are dangerous as
they frequently develop into pneumonia
Foley's Honey and Tar not only stops
the cough but heals and strengthens
the lungs so that no
serious results need
be feared. The genuine Foley's Honey
and Tar contains no harmful drugs and
is in a yellow package. Refuse substi
tutee.—J. H. Ander«n.
NIGHT
ti iT-fc !i U.Y*
Y-FEVER
ELY'S CREAM BALM
Sure to Cive Satisfaction.
CIVCS RELIEF AT ONCC.
It
cleanses, soofhos, heals and protects tin
li«*» ii membrane resulting frmn Caturr!
Ui'l Ives iiv».»y '([,1 iu the Ht'iwl plh'U
LW's'n es the Sena's of Taste and Hnu-ii
l&tsv to tt«e. Contains no iujuri. us d'-ngs
A[ ed ii.to the tv strils and absorbed.
W) cfnts at Druggists or bv
it. ('rutin Balm for v.w
75 cents.
GOOD
Madison
the
Many a strong man and many a
healthy woman bas much for which to
thank mother. The care taken during
their childhood brought them past
the danger point and made them
healthy men and women. Children
are geneially bothered at some period
with incontinence of urine, and inn
bility to retain it is ofttimes called a
haoit It is not the childien's fault
—the difficulty lies in the kidneys,
and can lx readily righted if taken in
the proper way. A Madison mother
shows you how.
Mrs. Fred Warner, formerly living
on Sontli Eighth street, Madison, S.D..
eaye: "Five years ago my little boy
sufiered from a weakness of the ki 1
nevs. He became very restless and
often complained of his back paining
bim severely. He seemed to have no
control over 'the kidney secretions,
especially during the night. Not long
ago my daughter also began to suffer
from a similar complaint and as I had
seen Doan's Kidnej Pills highly re
commended. I decided to give them a
trial. I procured a box at Ander
son's drug store and the results were
eo gratifying that I procured a fur
ther supply. Today my daughter i*
completely enrsd and my son is stead
ily improving."
For sale by all dealers. Price ro
cents. Foster-Milbnrn Co., Buffalo.
New York, sole agents for the United
States.
A lar*e
A
WESTERN COMPAMY
New business written
Income
Paid policy holders
Edgar F- Eshbaugh, Agency Director
F. Ball, District Manager
F. C- Stoltzman and S. G. Westaby Solicitors
MADISON CEMENT CO.
J. S. Thompson & Son, Prop.
Sidewalk Workers and
all Kinds of Cement Work
Phone Red-450
r. J. GALLAGHER
...Graduated Veterinarian
DENTISTRY and SURGERY
A Specialty
Offioe
and
Id
V
Hospital, Corner Harth
Ave. and Third Street.
MADISON SO. DAK
LAND IS THE BASIS OF
ALL WEALTH
and the demand lor Lake County farms is increasing If you
are search of
Dairying & 5tock
Raising
and where your family will have the advantages of
SOCIETY
GOOD CHURCH FACILITIES
Then come and see me, and I will show
If you are renting land now, paying #3 to $5 annual
rental, I will show you iust as good xand and sell
it to you at wliat you will pay out in rental
where you are in three yenrs, and
will give you easy terms ol payment
If you want a good location in Madison I have suoh for van.
number of substantial buildings have been built
in Madison the past season and the cit~r is steadily
growing in population.
Correspondence Solicited
Chas. B. Kennedy,
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA.
Established 1885 O I N K Fvely Mutual
Northwestern National Life Insurance Company,
Minneapolis.
RECORD
ADMITTED ASSETS
Total phid to policy holders
Insurance in force
OFFICERS.
L. K. Thompson, Pres.
W. J. Grrhani, Vice Poes. amTActaary
George E. Tow le, Tre |«.
Roliert E. Kfterly, Sxl,
John T. Baxter, Council.
Henry W. Cook, Medical Director.
F. M. Stickney, Cashier.
H. F. White, Auditor.
1908
gtjaMMSiE
a
Home in a Good Climate
where you can raise Wheat, Oats Barley Corp, Potatoes and
fact everything adapted to this latitude and wheie
you can successfully carry on
GOOD SCHOOLS
Tou
$5,250,000 Insurance gain written
1,500,000 Gain in assets
70o,o00 Gain in Surplus
January 1,1909.
The Northwestern Life issues all the latest and most improved forms of policies, and in any amnionnts
desired. It invests its income for the upbuilding of the territory in which it operates, and hae loaned to
the farmers of Minnesota, Iowa, North and South Dakota over $3,500,000.
FRED KURTH'S,
on draught at
J.
•a
iust what you want
FOli WESTERN PEOPLE
$2,5o,ooo
4ro.oou
I 5,7oo.ooO
7,f«»o,()o0
24,(KX oo
i[)
DIRECTORS
F. A. Chamberlain, Pres. Security Bank.
E. W. Decker, V. Pres. Northwestern 1'aak.
C. F. Jaffray, V. Pres. First National Bank.
A. A. Crane, V. Pres. Northwestern NationalJBank.
B. F. Nelson, Nelsou-Tuthill Lumber Co.
L. K Thompson, Pres. and General Mgr.
George E. Towle, Treas.
W. J. Graham, Actuary.
Sioux
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO.
MILWAUKEE BEER
Falls,
S- D.
Madison,
S D.
Madison, S.
D.
S. MURPHY,
PETER HEAGNEY
Prioate stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
at all Leading Saloona in the city.
L. J. AHMANN, A«ent.
^0
I
kW.-

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