OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 05, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-08-05/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

SENATORS SHOW
LITTLEJNT EREST
Listlessness Marks End of
Debate on the Tariff.
CUMMINS DENOUNCES BILL
tow* Senator Says the Measure Does
Not Come Up to His Idea of Tar
iff Reform and Is Not a Fair and
Reasonable Performance of the
Promise Made in the Platform of
Hie Last Republican Convention.
Washington, Aug. 5.—General llst
lewmess marked the final hours of de
bate on the conference report on the
tariff bill In the senate. The majority
of the members appeared to be merely
waiting for the end.
Senator Cummins of Iowa discussed
the paragraphs of the tariff bill gener
ally, not presenting his objections in
detail. He sought to establish his
contention that no substantial tariff
reform is accomplished by the changes
the bill makes.
Mr. Cuniniins announced his deter-.
ininntlnn to vote against the bill, i
though ho confessed the belief that it
was superior to any bill framed for I
revenue purposes and, so far as the
schedules go, better than the Dingloy
law.
"I am opposed to the conference re
port and to the bill which it embodies
because it is not such a revision of
the tariff as I have expended the best
years of my life in fighting for and
is not a fair and reasonable perform
ance of the promise of our platform,"
he said, and added:
"This is not a court of bankruptcy
and I am not willing to accept 10
cents on the dollar in discharge of the
obligations of the Republican party.
It always has been and is now a
solvent organization and it is not only
cble but its rank and file will insist
upon it paying Its debt in full. Its
pledges will be redeemed at par and
although the blindness of some of its
lenders may at this time postpone the
day of redemption I shall await with
patience, confidence and serenity the
hour at which it will keep full and
complete faith with the American peo
ple."
He expressed his admiration and
applause for the courage and per
sistence of the president "in attempt
ing to secure, anrl to a degree in se
curing. lower rates in the range of
dispute between the house and the
sen ale." He said:
"The range was very narrow and
the president has done all that one
man could for the betterment of the
blU."
MIGHT MEAN HIS DEFEAT
Speaker Cannon Cannot Afford to
Discipline -'Insurgents."
Washington, Aug. F.—A number of
the Republican "rule insurgents" have
not gone bock to the "reservation."
The close vote on the tariff conler
ftftrc report in the house showed this.
An incipient boom for Sereno E.
Payne, author of the tariff bill, tor
age&kcr of th» next oongreM,
*$k
A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY
'Vnnr
Why pay $75 to $90 per acre for land when you can
buy land that produces from 35 to 50 bus. of wheat,
Oats 75 to 150 bus., Flax 20 to 30 bus. per acre for
$15 and upward.
Just a few facts why this land is so productive.
The soil is a live, rich, alluvial clay, of very great
depth, ranging from 6 to 20 feet. We have then a
soil, which by nature, is fitted to take up the moist
ure of rains and snow and retain it.
comit-i iioti wiiii Uiis himwiii^ or "111
surgi'iif stivnulh, iu',i'd several of
Speaker Cannon's friends to contend
that "Uncle Joe" cannot afford to dis
cipline those Republicans who held
important committee assignments in
the last congress and who voted with
the "insurgents" at the beginning of
the present session.
There was no secret made at that
time of the speaker's Intention to de
pose Representative Cooper of Wis
consin and Representative Gardner of
Massachusetts from the chairman
ships respectively of the Insular af
fairs committee and the committee on
Industrial arts and expositions. There
is no indication that the speaker has
changed his decision on this point,
but a number of the "stalwarts" have
expressed to him belief that he can
not afford at this time to be vindictive.
ON GR0UNU Uf ILL Heal in
Chief of Police Shippy of Chicago
Resigns.
Chicago, Aug. 5.—George M. Ship
py, chief of
|Klicc
-4
haa1
-Hi
'i
CHIEF GEORGE M. 8HIPPEY.
Mr. Shippy is at Petoskey, Mich.,
from which place he writes that it will
be many months before his health can
be restored.
An Appeal for Harvest Help.
New York, Aug. 5.—Urgent appeals
have boon reeeivid here from Minne
sota and North Dakota for
10,000
men
who are needed to help harvest. th6
enormous crops. The Great Northern
Railway company and other interests
have Informed all employment bu
reaus that harvesting has just be
gun and that men will be paid from
$2 to S3.60 per day.
For Assault on Editor.
Louisville. Ky., Aug. 5.—General I\
P. Johnston, adjutant general of the
Kentucky state gmrd, was held to th..
grand jury for an assault with
cent on lei:ny B. Goode, editor of a
weekly publication here. Genera'
Johnston resented a reference to him
as "General i'cacock P. Johnston" Is
an editorial.
New President of Colombia.
Bogota, Aug. o.—Gonzales Valencia
has been elected president of the re
public ol Colombia by the national
congress to fill the unexpired term e,(
General Raiael Reyes, resigned. Th!
la 7«w.
FOR
of Chicago, has
tendered his resignation in a letter
received by Mayor Husse. The resig
nation is on the ground of ill health.
n
means that Valencia will occupy the is quiet in the city,
LABOR CONFLICT
IS MORE ACUTE
Ranks of Swedish Strikers
Considerably Swelled.
NO STREET CARS OR CABS
Employ** of Stockholm Conveyance
Lines Go Out and Means of Trans
portation Are Unavailable—Govern­
ment Takes Precautionary Steps to
Prevent Disorders—Food Supply
Already Affected.
Stockholm, Aug. 5.—The labor con
fllct in Sweden has become more
acute. While the ranks of the strik
ers are considerably swelled the gen
eral strike called has not yet be
come entirely effective. Many organ
izations, although sympathising with
the strikers, hesitate to join them
actively. The employes of the street
cat lines and the cab drivers have
stopped work and neither cabs nor
street cars are available. The fact
that, the troops are protecting the gas
works and the electric lighting plant
has incensed the workmen, whose
leaders threaten to call out all the
men unless the soldiers are with
drawn. The printers' union held a
meeting, but resolved to postpone for
the present any decision in the mat
ter of going on strike.
A corps of workmen, some thousand
strong, ie being organized with the
object of maintaining order and th'
people generally, bankers, merchants,
etc., are arming themselves for self
protection. The gun Bhops of the
city are practically denuded of re
volvers and small arms. All tour
ists have left Stockholm and the num
ber of visitors now in the city is
smaller than at this season for many
years past.
Railroad Men Continue Work.
Although the railroad men havo de
cided not to strike the government if
taking the precaution to guard the
tracks with troops, fearing attempts
to blow up bridges or injure the per
manent way. Quantities of dynamite
are reportod to have mysteriously dis
appeared recently from th® govern
ment stores.
The leaders of the strikers claim
that the end of the week will see
notable spread of the movement that
the railroad, postal, telegraph and tele
phone employes and the printers will
by that time have Joined In the strlk
The streets of Stockholm are filled
with idlers, who promenade back and
forth chaffing the volunteer street
cleaners, many of whom belong to the
better classes. All the saloons arc
closed and only the best restaurants
are permitted to remain open and
even hero It is possible to get win
only with a solid meal.
All the ferries have stopped run
nlng and there Is little communica
tlon bttween Stockholm and the sub
urbs reached by water routes. This
fact will result in a further diminution
of food supplies. For the present all
nADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, THI RSHAV,
but
post ol chid cxocutlv© for ftbout onu oxpoctod when th8 stocks of food w- crlmiu&l libeL
to ran tow.
The following statement is taken from the Dominion
Government Experimental farm situated near these
lands:
Six varieties of Oats yielded an average of over
130 bushels per acre.
Six varieties of Barley yielded ail average of over
71 bushels per acre.
Six vaireties of Spring Wheat yielded an average
of over 42 bushels per acre.
Six varieties of Peas yielded an average of over 58
bushels per acre.
Six varieties of Potatoes yielded an average of over
631 bushels per acre.
Six varieties of Corn for fodder yielded an average
of over 20 tons per acre.
Six varieties of Turnips yielded an average of over
20 tons per acre.
Six varieties of Mangels yielded an average of over
31 tons per acre.
Four varieties of Sugar Beets yielded an avtfage of
over 27 tons per acre.
MISSION CHURCH AND SCHOOL
Roosevelt Lays Corner Ston* at Kl
jabe, B. E. A.
Kljabe, B. E. A., Aug. 5.—Theodore
Roosevelt and his son Kermit arrived
here from Nairobi. T..o former presi
dent performed, the ceremony of lay
ing the corner "tone of the new mis
sion church and a school for white
children. In a brief address Mr.
Roosevelt said:
"It is the duty of the leading race
to help to higher plane of education
those who are backward. The work
of the mifsionr ries In this respect Is
most Unportudc I am particularly
pleased with what you are doing by
your schools for the children of the
settlers in this country."
After the ceremony Mr. Roosevelt
and his son went by train to Naiv
a.sha, where they at once went into
camp.
ADDS FIVE TO HER RECORD
Ida Lewis, Famous Lifesaver, Makes
Heroic Rescue.
Newport, R. I., Aug. 5.—Ida Lewis,
the "Grace Darling of America," who
from Limkt Rock lighthouse, off this
harbor, had saved the lives of eight
een persons, has added five more to
her splendid record.
A steamboat from New York raised
so heavy a swell that she overturned
a boat in which were five girls. In
stantly they were shrieking and strug-
4
IDA LEWIS.
gling. Ida Lewll, from her eyrie at
the south end of the harbor on a clus
ter of rocks, saw the girls' danger and
Jumped into her boat, named like the
first one, The Rescue.
With a bravery and vigor remark
able in a woman of nearly three score
and ten she rowtd to the girls and,
one after another, lifted them into her
boat.
8pecial Rule Necessary.
Washington, Aug. 8.—Objection
from Mr. Macon (Ark.) forced the
house to take a recess immediately
after convening in order to enable
the committee on rules to bring in a
special order to permit the house to
consider the conference report on the
urgent deficiency bill.
Catholic Priest Indicted.
New Orleans, Aug. 5.—Thirty-one
Indictments against Rev. John J. Holt
greve, pastor of the Catholic church
at Phnuemine, La., were returned by
the urand Jury of Iberville parish
Twenty-eight of the counts chargi
trouble is gravo crimes and
\V€.VST
the other three
S, 1909
MEN AND WOMEN SEEKING NEW HOMES AND INVESTMENTS
to Buy Cheap Lands in the Famous Saskatchewan Valley of Canada
BELIEVED ALL WILL
FJUL OF ADOPTION
al-
Amendments Proposed to
"Joker" Resolution
Washington, Aug. 5.—Every amend
ment offered to the concurrent resolu
tlon to correct the tariff conference
report so as to make reductions in
boots and shoes and harness and sad
dlery apply to manufactures from calf
skin as well as leather from hide.
heretofore dutiable probably will be
laid upon the table.
The New York senators, who de
sired to have changes made in th
conference report, called on Senator
Aldrich with requests that he lend
his Influence toward the acceptance of
such changes, but unlformally he re
plied that the resolution could not be
opened up to cover subjects other
than the leather schedule and the
necessary changes In the maximum
and minimum provision.
It is difficult to fort'e^st the length
of discussion on the concurrent reso
lution. Many Southern senators have
Indicated a desire to support amend
ments putting cotton ties and cotton
bagging on the free list. It is un
derstood that Senator McLaurin will
try to have agricultural Implements
made free and that Senator Clapp will
seek to amend the corporation tax
provision so as to Include "holding"
companies among the taxed corpora
tions. It has been suggested also
that amendments may be offered to
the cotton and woolen schedules and
that Senator Brlstow may offer an
amendment extending the scope of
the tariff board authorized by the
bill.
Senator Beverldge has had in contem
plation offering an amendment to the
tobacco internal revenue tax provi
sion for the purpose of restoring that
provision to the form in which it was
adopted ny the senate.
SHIPPED OUT OF
CITY IN TRUNKS
Possible Disposal of Kid
napped St. Louis Children.
8L Loafs, Aug. 6.—Three additional
arrests have been made In the kid
napping of Grace and Timmasso Vivi
ano, who were taken from their home
here Monday and aro being held for
$25,000 ransom. With the arrest of the
ruspectB the police announced a be
lief that he children were put in
trunks and shipped out of the city.
Lamantia Oiroloma and Domino
Lutticco, employes of l'ietro Fnnare, a
grocer, were the su«pects taken to
police head• iuaiters. Ciiroloma admit
ted having taken three trunks in a
grocery wagon to an express office.
Vincenzo Ricardo, a friend of Sam
Turrissi, with whom the children dis
appeared, and an unidentified man
supposed to be Turrissi, rode to the
express office with the trunks. The
trunks were put on the wagon at the
home of Joseph Pagano. also under
arrest.
As to Climate, the Chinook winter lessens the sever
ity of the winter and makes it possible for stock to
live in open the year round and make their own living.
AIID TFDMC. One-fourth Cash, and balance in five equal
V/Ull I Lit If I annual payments with interest at 6% per
annum on deferred payments.
Anyone contemplating buying land should first see the wonder*
ful samples of grain on display at the CHICAGO 5c and lOe
STORE, and consult
J. McDONALD
Representative of the
J. E. MARTIN LAND CO„ Ltd.
404-406 PHOENIX B'LD*(L, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Peter Marquart & Son
MEMBER OF
J&
HONEST CONCRETE
W. G. MARQUART,
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
President
Cement Waflrt,
Foundations, Bridget,
Culverts, anything
and everything
in
Guaranteed Cement
Construction.
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
—the
Madison State
MADISON, S. D:
FARM loans at lowest possible
Phone Green 263
RATES
People pant middle life usually have
some kidney or bladder disorder that
saps the vitality, which is naturally
lower in old age. Foley's Kidney liern
edy oorreots urinary troubles, stimulates
the kidneys, and restores strength and
vifjor. Itoureduric aoid troubles by
strengthening the kidneys so they will
strain out the uric acid that settles in
the muscles and joints oausing rheum
stiam.—J. H. Anderson
DR. H. P. GULSTINE,
...DENTIST.*!
'HONE 293
Office over The Bic Store ,MADISON, S. DAK
DR. O. ESTREM,
Physician and SuiftM
OfFICf PflONf 293
HOUSE PHONt Greta 439
Office wv TH 6H SHr« MADISON, MR
KENNEDY..
Vice Pruidcni
FOLEYSMONEY^TAR
luru Onli«t Pm»«nt» Pneumonia
E. J. COSTELLO
UNDERTAKER and EMBALMBl
Caskets and Funeral SuppGet
Calls Answered Day or Night
Phone 114 MADISON, S. D.
McDANlEL & TRIMMER
CONSULTING CIVIL ENGINEER}
S#toal Attention Gfrtati
St'I
Land Drainage and Surreys
CHAS. A. TRIMMER, MADISON, IB.
Offw witt f. G. W
''-I,
\'-U
1
xii
w-
*f iSi.1 i 1Jl

xml | txt