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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 13, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-08-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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DECISI8HC00LLY
Shows No Emotion When He
Is Held Still lnsan&
DENIES VIEW OF COURT
Contradict* Justice Ml lie* Statement
That He Still Cherishes the Same
Delusions That Drove Him to Shoot
Stanford White—Family and Child
hood History Main Factor In Ad
verse Decision of Case.
White Plains. N. Y., Aug. 18.—The
State of New York won a complete
victory over Harry K. Thaw when Jus
tice Isaac N. Mills decided that the
slayer of Stanford White is still In
sane and sent him back to the crim
inal insane asylum at Matteawan. Not
one of the many contentions made by
Thaw during the throe weeks of his
recent hearing were sustained. He la,
however, somewhat better off than be
fore he brought the present suit, be
causo Justice Mills In his decision
suggests—end the suggestion amounts
liiaetleally to an order—that Thaw at
Matteawan bo restored to the prlv
lieges he enjoyed during the first
three months of his stay there and
that his mother be allowed all the pos
6lbl« privileges and treated with ev
ery consideration when she calls to
seo htm.
The prisoner took the decision
coolly. His only statement was a de
nial of the assertion In the court's
opinion that he still cherished the
mm' delusions that drove him to
shoot White.
Dismisses Writ of Habeas Corpus.
IB formal language Justice Mills'
decision dismisses the writ of habeas
corpus under which Thaw applied for
his liberty and "remands him to the
custody of the defendant (Dr. Robert
B. Lamb, superintendent of Mattea
wan state hospttal), whence he was
produced 'hero."
In concluding that Thaw is now in
tone the court gives first importance
to his family and childhood history.
His determination that the prisoner
has not yet recovered is based prin
cipally on the opinion of Dr. Amos
Baker, assistant superintendent of
the Matteuwna asylum. "All such au
thorities," says Justice Mills, "are
public officers, with no conceivable
motive except to do their duties."
Justice Mills says that Thaw's be
lief in the stories of White's prac
tices is plainly a delusion, not based
on facta, as Thaw's attorneys sought
to show. Regarding Thaw's wife the
justice cays:
"About li01 he became enamored
of a young woman. Miss Nesbit, whom
be afterwards married. Sho was then,
by common reputation, woll known to
him, the mistress or a mistress of
Stanford White. She soon assumed
that relation to Thaw and, obviously,
to account to him for her former posi
tion with White, told him various wild
•IMi grossly improbable stories of tfes
Inception of that relation."
Influenced fcy State Alienists.
lTie court pays that It was mow
fflgjvlnced by tho testimony of tjje
REITER
We have first class farms with clay soil 6 te 20 ft
deep which raises from 40 to 50 bushels of No. 1
Northern Hard Wheat per acre, 100 to 150 bushels
of Oats per acre and 25 to to 30 bushels of flax per
acre, close to towns and in less than two years the
railroad from Prince Albert will be open to Hudson
Bay bringing these lands 1000 miles nearer Liverpool
than either Fargo or Minneapolis, thus advancing the
price of grain 10 cents per bushel.
The following is a sample of the many letters re
ceived at our Minneapolis office:
tmmm
alleni: is calii'i ...»• ttv :,mte til.? by
that of the prisoner's experts, fte
gardinp Dr. r.rltton D. Evans he says:
"Ho csfu rliuired great difficulty la
reconciling hir. present opinion with
MB
previous attitude In connection
with Uv.r» homicide trials and, to my
mind, did not entirely succeed
LA BO
doing,"
Thaw otldently made a bed Impres
sion upon the judge by hie actions
HOTH OH
and off the witness stund.
The oplnton calls particular attention
to Thaw's facial :ippearane\ espe
cially during the last afternoon of his
testimony, when for twenty minutes
h© spoke hi justification ot *bi« ex
travagant belief as to White's conduct
wttlJ a certain wotnan."
Th* court. In conclusion, expresses
Me sympathy with the distress of
ThiWfl rootli »i\ but dwIareH that. In
his opinion, her criticism of District
Attorney Jerome is unwiirr inNul
HURRAY SEEKS INFORMATION
Wants. Names of National Banks Afflli*
ated With State Institutions.
Washington, Aug. IS—Comptroller
of the Currency Murray htu directed
national bank examiners to forward at
once to
MB
office a list of national
banks in their districts which huve
affiliations with state institutions and
occupy the same building, or which
are In close proximity to their busi
ness affairs.
In some of the most conspicuous
bank failures In the past the fact has
been disclosed that the Insolvency of
the component members of the allied
institutions were ion# concealed by
shifting the aBBets between the insti
tutions to meet the exigencies of an
examination of each and the insolvent
condition was not discovered until a
Joint examination by national and
state examiners was madfe.
THREE OCCUPANTS KILLED
Russian Frontier Guards Fire on Ger
man Balloon.
St. Petersburg. Aug. 13.—Russian
frontier guards fired on a German
balloon, carrying four men, as It was
cros?ing the border, killing three of
the passengers and wounding a fourth.
The guards .say they fired, thinking
the balloon was a military airship and
that its mission was unfriendly.
The affair has caused great excite
ment here, as it is taken for granted
that Germany will call for an ei
plnnatlon and full reparation.
The wounded balloonist, with hit
three dead companions In the basket
beside him, succeeded in opening the
valve and bringing the balloon to the
ground.
Daring Escape After Surrender.
York. Pa., Aug. «13.—After voluntar
ily surrendering in California and
brought across the continent to an
swor a charge of murder in Maryland
Scott Johnson, aged twenty-thre
years. Jumped from the platform of a
sleeping car on a Pennsylvania rail
road train sotfth of this city and ep
caped The train was going fifty
miles an hour.
TRAGEDY ON STREET CAR
•ejected Lover Kills Qlrl and Tries to
End His Own Life.
Chicago, Aug. 13.—On a crowded
street car Thomas Katsnes shot and
killed Victoria Kawalac because she
failed to reciprocate his affections.
Katsnos also shot himself, but only
lnfli t.id a slight wound. He was for
merly a restaurant keeper and had
employed the girl UM a waitress.
SUTTON INQUIRY
eras close
Taking of Testimony Fi
nally Concluded.
GUN EXPERT LAST WITNESS
Declares It Impossible Under the Cir
cumstances for Dead Officer to Have
8hot Himself, as Sworn to by His
Companions—Advocate General An
nounces He Has No Argument to
8ubmit.
Annapolis, Md., Aug. It.—The court
of Inquiry investigating the death oi
Lieutenant James N. Sutton, Jr.. Unit-
Mr. Birney, counsel for Lieutenant
Adams, cross-examined the witness
and had him take a position on the
counsel table similar to that occupied
by Lieutenant Sutton on the ground
when the fatal shot was fired and ro
pout, with a service revolver, a dem
onstration the witness had previously
given of the difficulty of firing under
the circumstances.
Sticks to Previous Statement.
Dr. Schaeffer again declared that
with a service revolver and under the
conditions given Lieutenant Sutton
could not have shot himself.
Mr. Bimey sought to learn from the
witness whether the bullet may not
have plowed the scalp wound which
wus found on Lieutenant Sutton's
head and then turned and ponetrated
the skull. Dr. Schaeffer said he had
never known of such a easo and that
while he would not say It
1B
MADISON. SOITTII DAKOTA, FRIDAY, AI'GI ST 13. 1909
an im­
possible one bo would have to be con
vinced by ocular demonstration. This
closed the testlmony
Major Leonard stated that the gov
ernment bad no argument to submit.
He outlined the efforts of the govern
ment to lay before the court every
shred of testimony touching the case.
This having been done, he said, he
would not offer any argument unless
compelled by something that might be
said by the attorneys or other parties
to the Investigation.
Adjournment was than taken for the
day.
WU TING FANG RECALLED
Will Be Succeeded at Washington by
Chang Yin Tang.
Washington, Aug. 13.—Chinese Min
ister W'u Ting Fang has been recalled
from Washington and ordered to Pe
king for further assignment. His suc
cessor will be Chang Yin Tang, for
merly charge at Madrid and now dep
uty vice president of foreign affairs.
Mr- Wu ia'no w in Paru. to whiah eoun. General von Einein, retired.
I lived in Iowa 38 years and have made twice
as much money here in four years as I did in
Iowa duriag that (Mae.,*
try lit ha Item credited along with
the United States.
The recall surprised government
ft roles here. Dr. Wu has been the
eercditcd representative of China In
the American continent since March,
15)08, and during that time has done
much toward adding to the reputation
he established among the people gen
orally during his flrnt term as minis
ter to America in 1R07-1902. His wit
and interest In American life made
him a popular figure
His sympathies with the United
States during the Boxer trouble led to
lils first recall. It was reported then
that he was to be beheaded, but_.this
government promptly Intimated that
such a course would be offensive to
the United States.
MINNEAPOLIS IS SELECTED
Union Printers Wilt Meet In Milt City
Next Year.
St. Joseph, Mo., Aug. 13.—Minneap
olis was selected by the International
Typographical union convention as its
meeting place next year.
A strong fight for the 1910 gather­
ed States marine corps, has concluded' ing was made by Salt I^ake City and
the taking of testimony.
When court met Dr. Edward M.
Bch neffer of Washington, called as an
expert on gunshot wounds, resumed
the stand. When the court adjourned
the previous day Dr. Schaeffer had
shown on a skull the location and
direction of the bullet wound which
caused the death of Lieutenant Sutton
and had declared that, under the con
ditions established by the testimony
it would have been Impossible foi
Lieutenant Sutton to fire the shot.
Atlanta and the bailot resulted: Mln
neaioIis, 129 Salt Lake City, 16 At
lanta, 80.
Almost the entire day was taken up
by a fight over the Los Angeles situa
tion. where the local union asked the
removal of W. E. Mcljernon as Inter
national Typographical union repre
sentative in Los Angeles.
WILLING TO DO HER BEST
Bayou Sara, La., Sends Invitation
President Taft.
New Orleans, Aug. 13.—Bayou Sara,
La., has sent an invitation to Presi
dent Taft. Bayou Sara is the town
that attracted «nsiderable attention
by the wording of its Invitation to
Captain Fremont of the battleship
Mississippi:
"Bayou Sara is a h— of a place to
entertain in, but we will do the best
we can."
Through the mayor of Bayou Sara
word has been sent to the president
cordially urging him to spend a few
hours In that town.
HEAD Of GREAT WESTERN
Samuel M. Felton Selected by Mor
gan Interests.
St. Paul, Aug. 13.—Samuel M. Fel
ton, formerly president of the Chicago
and Alton railway ar.d later employed
by tho J. P. Morgan interests as a
consulting railway engineer, hats been
chosen as president of the reorganized
Chicago Great Western company. His
duties will begin Sept. 1 and he will
have complete charge of the road, re
porting only to the syndicate headed
by J. P. Mornan. __
ROUTED BY ARTILLERY FIRE
Spanish Qarrlson in Morooco Drives
Off Moors.
Penon de la (loinera, Morocco, Aug.
18.—The Moors who were firing on
the Spanish garrison here have been
irlven by artillery fire to the distant
hills. Their losses were considerable.
The bombardment of their
present po
sitions is being continued.
Prussian Minister of WaA
Berlin. Aug. 13.—General von Heer
tngiwi, commander of the Second army
oorjis. has been appointed by Em
peror William to the position of Prus
sian minister of war in succession to
WHY WORK FOR SOMEBODY ELSE
Milestone, Saskatchewan, April 1, 1909
Gentlemen:—
I have lived here on the same farm four years
and expect to stay here as long as I am a tiller of
the soil. I started very cautiously, buying only
160 acres, but as my faith in the country and my
money increased I bought more land, till now 1
have 960 acres, and the end is not yet. I bought
160 acres at $17.50 per acre. Broke 120 acre*
and seeded to flax, which made 2,400 bushels and
sold the flax at $1.23 per bushel. Thus the first
crop on 120 acres paying for the 160 acres and
leaving a balance of $150.00. Even better than
this has been done repeatedly. My crops hav®
averaged about $18.00 per acre for the four
years (each year).
Yours truly,
J.
Do you know that you can buy a good farm at $3.75 per acre, balance in five equal yearly
payments, in other words, just what your rent will cost you in other places.
J. CJmitfney.
FIVE PECFLE PEP!SH
IN MICHIGAN FIRE
Mother Escapes but Returns toi
Child and Dies Inflames.
Hancock, Mich., Aug. 18.—Five
were lost in a fire in a dwelling hou
here. The dead are: Mrs. Johi
Dlonne, Edward Dlonne, aged eight
years Peter Dlonne, an infant,
Amlnla Dlonne, aged twelve, and a
girl named Racine. The fire brek
out when the family was asleep. Tin
charred bodies of the victims wt
found In the ruins.
Rlrs. Dlonne got out of the house
but returning to rescue a child
ished in the flames. Her body w e
found with the Infant clasped In her
arms. The cause of the fire It un
known.
DOES NOT RELISH HtS JOB
Boy Shah of Perr,ia Cries for His
Mothsr.
Teheran, Aug. 13.—Sultan Ahmed
Mtrza, shah of Persia, king of ktn^
and possessor of other titles of nobil
ity and honor, sits alone in his paiuce
at Teheran and cries for his mother.
On July 7 he was taken from her
arms, compelled to renounce his
father, separate himself from his par
ants, mumble words which mean'
PERSIA'S BOY SHAH.
nothing to him, hang on himself a be
Jeweled sword that was as high as he
is and become the ruler of a nation
torn by tactions, decadent in Its poli
tics and threatened by more powerful
countries.
Bultan Ahmed Mlrza, king of klngB,
Is only eleven years old and despite
his titles is a normal boy of that age.
For further information call
404-406 PHOENIX B'LD'G.,
J. McDONALD
At the Chicago 5c and 10c Store,
Madison, S. D., or write to
J. E. MARTIN LAND CO, Ltd.
MEMBER OF
jHONEST CONCRETE
W. G. MARQUART,
DR. H. P. GULSTINE,
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Peter Marquart & Son
Cement Walks,
Foundations, Bridges,
Culverts, anything
and everything
in
Qttsrftntced Cemevt
Construction.
Phone
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
CMAS. B. KENNEDY C. L.
President1
—THE
Madison State Bank
MADISON, S.
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
...DENTIST../,
"HONE 293
Office aver The Bit Stare MADISON, S. DM
H1MPLE RKMEDY FOR LA (JK1PPE
La Urippe coughs are dangerous as
they frequently develop into pneumonia
Foley's Honey and Tar not only stops
the '-uugh but heals and strengthens
the lungs so that no serious results need
be feared. The genuine Foley's Honey
and Tar contains
DO
harmful drugs and
is in a yellow package. Refuse substi
tutes.—J. H. And«r»»on.
Mr. P. O. FrHts, Uneonta, N. Y.
writes:
"My
little gi*l was greatly
ben
etitted by taking Foley's Orino Laxa
tive, and 1 hinklt is the beet remedy
for coDstiprtion and liver trouble."
Foley's Orino Laxative is beat for women
and children, as it is mild, pleasant and
effective, and is a splendid spring medi
cine, as it cleanses
the svstem and
slears the comnlsotion.—J. H. Anderson
Gre'n
263
KENNEDY,t
Vice President
SOLEYSIKMTHDAR
Ouren Cnlrf«a frmwnii PnewMaia
E. J. COSTELLQ
UNDERTAKER and EMBALMS!
Caskets and Funeral Supplies
Calls Answered Day or Night
Phone 114 MADISON, S. D.
McDANIEL & TRIMMER
CONSULTING CIVIL ENGINES!)"
Special Attention Given to
Land Drainage and Snvejs
CMAS. A. TRIMMBt, MADISON, S.D.
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