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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 13, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-08-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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SIDEWALKS,
®lje Jlaily $ro?*ct
AMWOII. BOtJTK DAKOTA.
TELEPHONE, NO. 269.
FK1DAY. AlKJ. i:». 19(Xt
o
Aberdeen—Two strained glass win
|towa have jvst oeen placed in the new
Methodist Episcopal church one de
picting Christ in Gethsemane, and the
other the three Marvs at the tomb.
The two windows cost in the neighbor*
ImhmI
of $.",01)0,
Pierre— The Angnst teacher*' ex
aminations in this state brought a
larger number of applicant* than did
Jfce July examinations. The nuinbeT
applying in August reached nearly
1,500. If the average number pass, it
Will mean altoat Hon teachers to heli
an the demand which always shows
chronic shortage in the state at the
v4feniug of the fall terms of ecnool.
Hudson—Peter Wassenaar, Jr., who
lives on the Gove farm in Eden town
•hip, was setting a hay stacker on Fri
d&y afternoon. Ilis two younger sons
Were playing about him, and while
III. Wassenaar was driving a stake.
Chamberlain—A bad railioad wreck
fcotweon Kadoka and Belvidere wan
•arrowly averted. The east bound
freight was going at a fast rate of
((peed and when turning a curve the
Ifcgineer saw a kinked rail. Immedi
Btely reversing his engine he and the
ftieman jumped for their lives. They
.Were pretty well shaken up, but out
of derailing the tender there was
tio serisua damage done.
Menno-It is feared that efforts to
ijlrill an artesian well here to provide
Hie town with water for fire protection
§nd domestic purposes will prove un
successful. drillers have encoun-
tardestthickThe
»red a layer of granite of the
character, and it is feared the
.4rill will be unable to go through it! ?n(1
n.
The Big Store.....
lUMDiimom
By mall, 1
r«ar
Concrete Foundations
and BRIDGES
ALt WORK GUARANTEED
R.w.THOMPSON,BrookingsCement
$4 00
By ml!, 0 months 9 00
By mati, S month*. 100
fly mad, 1 inuutb W
J^oarrUrpar wmH |0
HTAD1 Proprietor.
H.
A.
Whh
HTAHL. BiiIimi IkSlftl.
STATE NEWS
Salem The ft-year old daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. William Hulz. residing
Wiir here, inet with a peculiar acci
dent which necessitat*l an operation
While playing she rail a needle into
Iw»r knee, breaking the needle in two
places, one piece lodging near the knee
joint. Tho broken part of the needle
Was located by an X-ray machine and
removed after an operation. An
laU noting observation made by the
physicians was that although the
net'die had Iwen in the child's knee
only a few hours, oil comparing it
with the other pieces it was found to
be corroded while the other piece was
110*
J. A. JOHNSON
Co.
wage an active campaign for eijnal
suffrage rights, with Mrs. J. A. John
hoii, of Fort Pierre, as the head of the
organizntoin. In a few days teinpor
ary headquarters will l»e opened at
Fort Pierre, and the business will lie
transacted from that place until the
convention, to be held some time in
ctuber, selects a place for permanent
headquarters foi the campaign.
Hinaeton-The terrtory northwest of
Sinseton was visited again by a de
structive hail atorm. The hail was ac
companied by a terrific downpour of
rain, which lodged the ripe grain and
sc thoroughly soaked the ground that
it in impossible to use a binder in the
fields. The loss by hail was about 00
l»er oent.
NEWHOMES
Thousands of Settlers Will Estab
lish Homes on Cheyenne
Reservation
Pi WW, Aug. 12. The settfgunt of
the Cheyenne River reservation next
spring will mean thousands of new
homes established on the Daknta prai
ries, with a heavy increase in popula
tion to the country west of the Miss
ouri. The new settlers will not have
long to wait on any part of the tract
for mil facilities doss at band, and
some of them will lind the road there
ahead of them It is practically cer
tain that the Milwankee ro.id will
have a part of their lines built liefoie
the date of oeginning settlement, and
the Minneapolis & St. Louis and North
western systems will have lines into
the territory at an early date. The
lands opened to settlement after tak
ing out school lands and Indian al
lomenta, will leave fourteen thous
and quarter wvtious tor filing. For
these, with past and present rusher for
legistraiton will mean that over oue
hundred thousand will register for a
chance, and the tirst few thousands
will get a chance to pick as fine land as
is to be found in the northwest. Tlu
Prank, a lad of 6, in some way got his comers will find that ^hey will
fcwnd on the stake and his father Ix ing
Unable to atop the blow of the descend
ItK 10-pound post maul, hit the little 1
follow on the band, smashing the
member in bad shape. Immediate
Medical attention saved the boy's baud
but it will l)e crippled to some extent
H!he father was almost frantic, hlain
i»g himself tor the accident, which
Was entirely unavoidable.
u"*"
u 1
have to pick over rough lands, bat
many thousands will find the spots to
build prosperous homes in that country
Deafness Can nut he Cured
by local applications, as they oannot
reach the diseased portion of the ear.
There is only one way to euro deafness
and that is by constitutional remedies.
Deafness is caused by an inttamed con
dition of the muooue lining of the Fjii
stachian Tube. When this tube is in
flamed you have a rumbling sound or
imperfect hearing', and when it is en
tirelv closed, deafness is the result, and
unless the inttamation can be taken out
and this tube is restored to its normal
condition, hearing will be destroyed for
ever nine cases out of ten are caused by
Catarrh, which ie nothing but an iu
flamed condition of the miicoui surfaoes.
We will give One Hundred Dollars for
any case of deafness (caused by catarrh)
that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh
Cure. Bend for circulars, free.
F. J. CHKNEY A. CO Toledo, O.
Hold by Druggists, 75.
Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation
W often wonder bow any person can
be persuaded into taking anything but
Poloys Honey and Tar for ooughs, eolds
lnnK
to the artesian supply below 'n*° accepting "own make of other sub
_. istitutee. The genuine contains no
•. Pierre The state equal suffrage or- i harmful drugs and is in a yellow pack
Sanitation is already getting ready to, age. —J. II. Anderson
a
i
trouble. Do not befooled
HONEY AND BOOZE
Rich South Dakotan Creates
Sensation in Sioux
City
Sioux City, Aug. 12.—Loaded down
with firewater and the com of the
realm and tossing it fioui his lingers
as though he was firmly convinced
that it was the "filthy lucre" as it is
sometimes called, Joe Morrissey, of
Vivian. 8. 1)., a rich rancher, was ar
rested by Detective Curtis yesterday af
ternoon on the charge of intoxication.
From the man's various pocket*
bills and silver amounting to
were takw. lie had a bill of sale for
some catte which indicated that he
had received |i72 for his ''farm bean
ties'' yesterday, so that in the inter
vening time be evidenty had disposed
of |94.
The man was arrested at the in
stance of employes of a Pierce street
whoesale house, who found him wav
ing his bills at the girls, and yelling
at them to "come out and haw a sodv
water,'' according to Detective Cnrtis.
Curtis said that when he found the
man be was surrounded by a gang of
ntwsies," all of whom had benefited
by his lienevolent mood.
"They thought he waa a regnlar
Scotty of Death a Valley," said tho
officer.
UPWARD MOVEMENT IN PRICES
Advance on Stock Market Carries Un
ion Pacific to 209.
New York, Aug. 13.—A lively specu
lative movement in the stock market
mnrked the opening. During the first
hour I'nlon Pacific sold near 209 and
Southern Pacific, Louisville and Nash
ville. United States Steel and Penn
sylvania were prominent. Prices were
advanced in London as a preliminary
to the opening here. Rumors that an
Increase In the Union Pacific dividend
had been determined on, that Louis
ville and Nashville was to distribute
a stock bonus to stockholders and
that arrangements for the placing ot
a large stock issue abroad had been
made accounted for the activity. Profit
taking sales were so heavy on the ad
vance as to stagger the market and
induced reactions within
the opening.
an hour of
STRIKER SHOT BY NEGRO
Latter Had Been Attacked by Mob and
Badly Beaten.
Pittsburg, Aug. 13. The first fatal
ity growing out of the strike at Mr
Kees Rocks occurred when Steve Hor
vat, one of the strikers, was shot and
killed by Major Smith, a negro, whom
a crowd of two score striking foreign
ers had attacked by mistake.
The negro, journeying to his work
at the Pennsylvania Malleable com
pany's plant, was accosted by a crowd
of strikers and accused of being a
"strikebreaker" In the employ of the
Pressed Steel Oar company. The
mob knocked him down and was un
mercifully beating him when ho drew
a revolver and commenced to shoot.
At almost the first shot Horvat fell
mortally womded. Smith w«« «r
rested.
OULUTH BOY KILLS FATHER
Fatal 8hot Fired Following Family
Quarrel.
Duluth, Aug. 13.—John O. Ostby, a
prominent groccryir.an, was shot and
killed by his eighteen-year-old son
BJorn at their home here after a fam
ily quarrel relative to the payment of
the funeral expenses of one of the
children of the family who died a
week ago.
Young Ostby is under arrest. He
ad niits the killing and coolly says he
will tell the particulars when he is
nlHced nn (rial.
STRIKERS FIGHT
WITHOFFiCERS
Serious Battle Occurs at
Fort William, Out
EIGHT HEN ARE WOUNDED
Injured Include Chief of Canadian Pa
cific Constabulary, Who Will Die.
and Several Members of His Force.
Strikers Were Supposed to Be Un
armed, but Weapons Appear Rap
idly When Battle Starts.
Fort William, Ont, Aug. 13.—A bat
tle royal occurred here between Cana
dian Pacific railway constables and
strikers on the docks. Eight men
were wounded, some of them'serious
ly, and for a time shots were flying
thick.
Canadian Pacific railway special
constables went over to the Canadiun
Pacific railway boarding house foi
dinner and the strikers refused to al
low them to return to their posts. One
of the constables pulled a gun and In
place of the sticks with which the
strikers were armed guns appeared
as if by magic. The constable fired
and a man dropped. In a second the
noise and confusion was indescriba
ble, men running about and bulletf
whistling all around. There were sev
eral hundred strikers and the majority
had grins.
The men, wounded were Sergeant
Taylor, city force, badly C. M. Dick
inson, Times-Journal reporter, badly:
Chief of Canadian Pacific Railway Po
lice Ball, fatally Special Constabl*
Carpenter, knee smashed, and another
Canadian Pacific railway constable,
name unknown. Two Greeks, names
unknown, were wounded, one of them
seriously, and Jack Lake, a butcher,
was also injured.
The militia have been called out
and the riot act read.
ABDUL HAMID NEAR DEATH
Condition af Deposed Sultan of Tur
key Alarming.
Salonica, Aug. 13.—The death of
former Sultan Abdul Hamid Is de
clared to be imminent as a result of a
severe attack of angina pectoris.
Three surgeons from Constantinople
have arrived here and an operation on
ABDUL HAMID.
th* defieeed ruler will probably be
performed in a desperate effort to
save his life.
Abdul is confined In a palace prison
on the outskirts of the city. He has
been a very sick man for months, hut
it has been only within the last few
days that his condition has become
alarming.
REVISION OF TARIFF
COST HALF MILLION
Expenses of Extraordinary Ses
sion of Congress.
Washington, Aug. 13.—The extnrnr
dfnary session of congress which n
vised the tariff law cost tho Amerl
a
people, it has been estimated by so tin
of the statisticians around the Cap
itol, about $r.00,000.
Many different items enter into thi
grand total, the chief of which ii
mileage. The house's expenso on thl.
account aggregates $154,000 and that
of the senate $47,000. Extra pay al
lowed to employes on both sides of
the Capitol amounted, it is estimated,
to about $150,000. Special employes
engaged in compiling information for
congress and the committees relative
to
r.he
tariff were paid good salaries.
The government printing office has
not yet supplied a statement concern
ing the cost of printing the tariff bill
reports and hearings, but it Is known
that this will be large.
IOWA DAY AT SEATTLE FAIR
Appropriate Exercises Held at l*pe
sition Auditorium.
Seattle, Wash., Aug. 13.--Iowa day
at the Alaska-Yukon-Paclflc exposi
was. oelobrated b£
basket picnic, a reception and ball.
Seattle has 25,000 former Iowans
imong its cltteens and there are Iowa
'»cieties In Spokan and Tacoma At
noon residents and former residents
of Iowa assembled under different
Iowa banners at the picnic grounds on
the lake shore and there registered.
Exercises at the Auditorium were held
in the afternoon. An Iowa reception
was also held in the Washington state
building. The festivities closed with
a ball in the Washington building.
NO SETTLEMENT REACHtU
Chicago Traction Officials and Em
ployes Continue Conferences.
Chit ago, Aug. 13.—Traction officials
and union leaders continue their nego
tiations in an attempt to reach a sat
isfactory plan for the sottlement of
the dispute between the street car
employes of this city and the street
railway companies. It was still thought
in many quarters that the wage dis
pute would he settled without resort
to arbitration or to calling out the
car employes, who have voted to
strike in case their demands are re
fused by the railway officials.
Taken After Desperate Fight.
Ravenswood, W. Va., Aug. 13.—
After putting up a desperate fight on
a shanty boat hidden in the mouth of
a small stream John Lloyd was cap
tured by government officers, who
found on the boat a oomplete counter
feiter's outfit and 160 spurious ^5 gold
pieces.
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICES
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Aug. 12.—Wheat
Sept., 97%c Dec., fMy4^94%c May,
ns^c. On track—No. I hard, $1.38
No. 1 Northern, $1.37 No. 2 North
em, $1.35 No. 3 spring, $1.31#1 -33.
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth. Aug. 12.—Wheat—To arrive
and on track—No. 1 hard, $1.2!% No,
1 Northern. $1.28% No. 2 Nnrth-rn,
$1.28^ Sept.," 9S%c Oct... !7
Dec., 94%e: May, Flav—To ar
rive and on track. $1.50: Sent.. Si.38:
Oct, fl.oiv, Nov.. SI.: 1
$1.81.
8t. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul, Aug. 12.—Cntt'n—Good to
choice steers. iffi.Ofitf/ f!.7r fair to good,
$5
.OOtf? fi.SO good to choice cows and
heifers, $4.25ft i.2r veals, $5.fi0f/0.2".
TTogs—$7.25^7.60. Sheep—Wethers.
$1.35^4.75 yearlings, $4.75^'".00
lambs, $5.00 6.50 spring lambs,
$6.00©7.50.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Aug. 12.—Wheat—Sept..
§7%c Dec., 94%tfJ95c May,
SSi-fcc. Com—Sept., fi4%e: Dec., 53%
ft
5394c May, 54%e. Oats—Sept.,
87c Dec.. 37c May. 89%g39%c. Pork
—Sept., $20.45 Jan., $16.80. Butter
Creameries, 22VfeI26c dairies, 20®
23V»c. Eggs—I8'ff22c. Poultry—Tur
keys, 14c chickens, 14c spring, 17
ftflSc.
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago, Aug. 12.—Cattle—Beeves,
$4.35(§7.50 Texas steers, $4.H)#5.50
Western steers, $4.00f? fi.00 stocker:
:ind feeders, $3.10^5.15 cows and
l.eifers. $2.2of fi.00 calves, $ft.50£(
w
2 5 o s i 7 u
?7.2.ri'd 7/5 heavy. $7.10^8.00: rough.
7.1«ff.?7.SSs good to t-holec heavy.
T7.35fjS.00: pigs, $6.S5ft'7.75. Bhoop
--Native, $3.10V« :.''- u-!iEgs, $4.50
-rfi.TS: r-^740.
If you have backache and urinary
troubles you should take Foley's Kidney
llemedv to strengthen and build up the
kidneys so they will aci properly, as a
•^rious kidney trouLle may develop
H. Andersen.
a
WORTH
MOUNTAINS
OFGOLD
During Change of Life,
says Mrs. Chas. Barclay
(Iranitevlllo, Vt. "I was passing
•irnmrh tf e 'hangeof Life and suffered
from nervousness
andother annoying
symptoms, ami I
can truly sav that
I A'dla E. rinkham's
Vegetable Com
pound has proved
worth mountains
of gold to mo, as it
restored my health
and strength. I
never forget to tell
my friendB what
I A'diaE. rinkham's
Vegetable I'uinpotmd has done for me
during this trying period. Complete
restoration to'healtlh means so much
to me that for the sake of other suffer
ing women I am willing to make tnv
trouble public so you may publish
this letter." --Mhs. Chap. Bakcxay,
11. F.I) Granite
ville, V t.
No other medicine for woman's ilia
has received such wide-spread and un
qualified endorsement. No other med
icine we know of has such a record
of cures of female ills as has Lydia E.
IMnkham's Vegetable Compound.
For more than 30 years it has been
curing female complaints such as
Inflammation, ulceration, local weak
nesses, fibroid tumors, irregularities,
periodic pains, backache, indigestion
and nervous prostration, and It is
unequalled for carrying women safely
through the period of change of life.
It costs but little to try Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, and,
as Mrs. Barclay says, it is "worth mimiy.
tains of gold to suffering women.
PHONE 195
COAL
V"
Mi '"r
E. W. KETCHAH
w3l deliver promptly to any part of the city
the best grade of
HARD AND SOFT COAl
PHONE 256
We handle only the
best and deliver to
all parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
A O A N E
Mr. 8. W. Jackson, 815 Weaver Iilock,
Greenville, Ohio, says: "While I was
superintendent of construction of J. F.
Bonder and Bros.' Co., of Hamilton,
Ohio, I became entirely unfit for busi
ness with catarrh of the stomach.
"A friend called my attention to a
remedy for this condition. 1 began to
Improve at once. I was soon able to re
turn to my former profession.
"It would require many pages to de
scribe the condition I was in and the re
lief I have obtained."
Here is another case. Officer George
Y. Stout,
Ti\
North Broadway, Balti­
more, Md., says: "I suffered very much
with catarrh of the stomaeh and ner
vous indigestion. I lost fifty pounds In
four months.
"A friend called my attention to a
remedy, which I used, and gradually
got well. I have gained half my lost
weight back again."
Chronic Stomach Trouble.
o e i e s i e 688 South
Main Kt., Ios Angeles, Oal., secret&iy
of Lather's International Union, was
also Buffering from catarrh of the stom
aeh along time. He grew thinner and
paler, lost ail ambition and appetite.
Sick at the stomach, indigestion con
tinually.
A friend also called his attention to
a remedy, which brought about a de
cided improvement. After continuing
the use of the remedy for a month, he
considers himself permanently relieved.
Now, once more. Mr. Christian Ilof
man, Rlatington, Pa., says he suffered
for many years witli catarrh of the
stomach. It produced a miserable
couch, day and night. He
tried
doctors
and many remedies. At last his atten
tion was called to a remedy, tho same
remedy that relieved tho others which
have loon referred to above. He claims
that he was entirely rid of his stomach
di'Uculty.
Pe-ru-na Brought Back Health.
What wu« the remedy that haa
wrought tins remarkable relief? Ho far,
the remedy has not leen mention'*!.
If any ono doubts the correctness of
thc*e statement* it la very easy to ver
ify them by writing to the people whose
names have bean given, enclosing a
itaiup for reply.
Tho remedy la within the reach of
ivwy one. It ia simply the good, old
itandard reliable remedy known as
Peuna.
Rlatlriir
COAL
'AMINO'
Thousands of millions
of cans
of
BOYAL IS THE ONLY BAFTN'G POWDER
MADE FROM ROYAL CRAPE CKtAM OF TARTAB
Catarrh of the Stomach
a Prevalent Disease
Difficult to Relieve.
Royal Baking
Powder have been used
in making bread, biscuit
and cake in this country,
and every housekeeper
using it has rested in perfect confi
dence that her food would be light,
tweet, and perfectly wholesome. Royal is a safe
guard against the cheap alum powders which are
the greatest menacers to health of the present day.
I I E N E E Y
If the truth were known, the proba
bilities are that Pertina has relieved
as many cases of catarrh the stomach
as any other popular remedy in exis
tence. We have a great many unsolic
ited testimonials from all parts of the
United Slates, declaring In strong and
enthusiastic terms that Peruna haa en
tirely rellevod them of catarrh of tho
stomach, that they were wretched and
miserable beyond words, but l'erima
has restored them to health, vigor and
happiness.
These are the facts. Now, if yoo have
stomach difficulty, it is up to you to act
upon them or ignore them, as you
please.
Symptoms of Stomach Catarrh.
"The affection may result from errom
in diet, or the use of alcohol. The ex
cessive use of tobacco, especially when
the juice or the leaves are swallowed,
is likely to cause it.
"Highly seasoned or coarse, irritating
foods, sometimes induce the disease.
"As chronic gastritis (catarrh of the
stomach) is essentially a secondary
affection, ono of the primary causen is
an unhealthy state of the mouth, nose
or throat, such as bad teeth or catarrh
of the nose (ozena).
"The patients are usually poorly
nourished, pale, sallow, thin, fatigue
easily indticod, muscles flabby. Losa
of appetite or capricious ap|Mtite,
"Tho tongue is usually coated brown
ish gray. Cankered mouth ii a com
mon occurrence.
•'Pain is not common. When present
it is usually dull, and is aggravaled \j
food, especially when this Is of an irri
tating character.
"Vomiting may oocnr in the morning.
Also after meals. Sickness to the stom
ach frequent and persistent.
"Food produces dull headache, and
feeling of general nervous distress.
Constipation usually quite marked."
These symptoms, given by Gould and
I'yle, coincide exactly with the frequent
descriptions Dr. Hartman is receiving
from patients
all over the United States.
If you have any of these symptoma
got a bottle of Peruna. Take a done be
fore each meal. See If your stomach
does not immediately feel better, your
appetite improve, your digestion at
once resume business.
People who object to liquid medicinal
Can now secure Peruna tablets.
jiun.i

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