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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 14, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-08-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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NAVY SENT TO
AW OF ARMY
Spanish Fleet Will Concen
trate at lelilla.
LAND FORCE THREATENED
Msrina'e Thlrty-elfhl Thou­
sand Men Apparently Unable to
Take the Offensive Against the
Moors—Ministerial Crisis May Re
sult From Spanish Troubles at
Home and Abroad.
Madrid. Aug. 14.—All the vessels of
the Spanish navy have received orders
to concentrate at MeMila, where a
Spanish force of nome 88,000 men un
der General Marina Is threatened by
strong gathering of Moors, who re
sent Spain's punitive expedition for
tho mnnicr" by the Moors of eight
Spanish laborers.
The Heraldo says a ministerial
Crisis is imsHible because of strained
relations between the minister of the
Interior and ihe minister of war, who,
during the reeent disorders at Barce
lona, Issued instructions diametrically
opposite.
Premier Maura was questioned re
garding the possibility of a ministerial
crisis. He declined to discuss the
likelihood of a crisis except to say
that personally he wished to retire
from office, but that ho had no hoi«
of :i!i/lns his desire nt this time.
MOORS KEEP UNDER COVER
Spanish Artillery Not Causing Much
Loss of Life.
Melilla, Morocco, Auk. 14.—Friendly
natives bring in reports that although
the Spanish artillery fire Is destroying
the camps of the Moors it. is not. cans
ing great loss of life, as the Riffs hav
built a series of subterranean churn
bers and passages under their loea
tlons, in which they take refugt
emerging only when the cannonuding
ts over.
The Moors made nn attempt to cut
Ho Spanish railroad. Searchlights
tffwevor, revealed their purpose and
they wore driven back.
There Is as yet no evidence here of
thfl beginning of General Marina's
march into tho Interior. The Spanish
Wtillory continues to bombard Moun
Quruga, the headquarters of the Moor
Ish |»osltions. Several modern guns
Of French construction have arrived
Here, but the Spanish artillerymen are
fefivlng considerable difficulty in learn
tog how to manipulate them.
Tt is explained that General Ma
rlna's advance has been delayed in
order to permit of the complete or
gnnlrattm at the commissary depart
ment.
MOORS KEEP UPSTEADY FIR
Spanish Garrison at Penon de la Co
rners Moy Soon Be Isolated.
Penon de la Gomera. Morocco, Aug.
14.—The Moors who surround the
8panish garrison here kept up an in
eessant attack all day Thursday. In
tlie evening, however, they withdrew
to the hills and built great fire?, by
&
We have first class farms with clay soil 6 to 20 ft
deep which raises from 40 to 50 bushels of No. 1
Northern Hard Wheat per acre, 100 to 150 bushels
of Oats per acre and 25 to to 30 bushels of Flax per
acre, close to towns and in less than two years the
railroad from Prince Albert will be open to Hudson
Bay bringing these lands 1000 miles nearer Liverpool
than either Fargo or Minneapolis, thus advancing the
price of grain 10 cents per bushel.
The following is a sample of the many letters re
ceived at our Minneapolis office:
the h! ii i
their iuttiilac'.u ou lite town a
rlson
Ono by one the telegraph -wires con
nectlns Alhucemas and Ceota with
Penon de la Corpora have boon rut by
the Mooiixh NilU ts and It Is probable
that the garrison here will soon be
completely Isolated. Thorp Is a
chanee, however, that tho telegraph
employes will succeed in repairing the
linos.
The Moors have suffered many men
killed or wounded.
AFFECTS NEW JEHSEY MEN
Settlement of Hatter*' Strike Brought
About by Governor.
Newark, X. J., Aug. 14.—l'lans for
settling the hatmakers' strike, which
has been in prioress in Newark an«i
the Qranges since January, were
agreed upon In a conference between
the manufacturers and John A. Moffat,
president of tho United Hatters. Tho
conference was held at the request of
Governor Fort and took place in his
cottage at Sea Girt. The agreement,
it is understood, is a compromise ani
does not include the New York men.
ON PLEA OF THAW'S MOTHER
Prisoner Will Stay at White Plains
Until Wednesday.
Mount Vernon, N. Y., Aug. 14.—
Harry IC. Thaw will go back to Mat
tcawan Wednesday, Aug. 18. JuF,tlo
Isaac N. Mills has signed the formal
order recommitting him to the aBy
lum on that date,. The Justice said
that he allowed Thaw to stay live days
more at the White Flalns Jail on th
plea of Thaw's mother. Tho Justice's
recommendation that Thaw be grant
ed the privileges he enjoyed during
the first throe months at the lnstltu
tlon was mado mandatory and a part
of the order.
Thaw's contention tfcut his original
commitment to Matteawan was ilk
pal will bo argued before the state
court of appeals during the week of
Oct. 4. Attorney Morschauser said
that he expected a decision by Oct. 12
Ho contemplates no further legal pro
ceedtngs before that time unless it Is
found necessary to apply for tho ord
directing the Mattep.wan authorltU
how Thaw shall be treated.
UNDER COVER OF HEAVY FOG
Pour Hundred Strikebreakers Landed
at McKeea Rocks.
Pittsburg, Aug.
14.—Taking
advan
tago of a heavy fog which enshroudi
the Ohio river the Pressed Steel Car
company landed about 400 strike
breakers in tho plant at McKei
Hocks. Shortly after the arrival of
the strikebreakers the 140 Hudson
River company men from New Yor
quit work in a body.
Sheriff Humbert has resumed live
eviction of the strikers' families. He
is being aided by twenty-five negro
TUNNEL FIRE STILL RAGING
Car Tracks and Water Maine Put Out
of Use.
Lynchburg, Va., Aug. 14.—The lire
which started Wednesday in the
Southern Railway tunnel here is still
raging unchecked. Fully 2f0 feet has
fallen, Including the entire width of
Rivermont avenue, canying dow
street car tracks, water and gas mains
and telephone and electric liTht pol
A hole 13 being drill* into the toj.
of the tunnel, the idea being to use
steam to e"tlr?r i"h the blaze.
fails dynamite will bo used.
WU'S AS
ALSOJECALLED
China to Change Entire Le
gation at Washington.
BANG IS A PROGRESSIVE
New Minister, Although Educated at
Home, Is in Thorough Sympathy
With the Policy of Adopting West­
ern Ideas—Retiring Minister Want
ed In Peking to Complete Task Be
gun by Him Several Years Ago.
Washington, Aug. 14.—That there
will be a complete change in the Chi
nese legation here was made evident
by the receipt of a cablegram recall-
Dr. Yen Wei Chin, second secre
tary, to Peking. Dr. Yen Is a gradu
ate of the University of Virginia and
came here with Mr. Wu. His ac
quaintance with American affairs
made hltn a prominent factor in Mr.
Wu's regime. I)r. Yen's sympathy for
the reforms of China was one ol his
distinguishing traits.
Minister Wu, who ts now on his
mission to Peru, will hasten to Wash
ington. although he did not expect to
return here when he left until Octo
ber.
Officials who are close to the Chi
nese legation, while disavowing any
knowledge of the reasons for Mr. Wu's
recall, believe that he will be engaged
at Peking in concluding the codifies
tlon of the laws of China, which work
was begun by him when he was first
recalled several years ago.
Chang Yin Tang, who will succeed
Minister Wu, is regarded here as In
perfect accord with Dr. Wu In the
latterV general views on the future1
development of China. Both the pros
ent. minister and his successor are of
the progressive element. While Chang
Yli. Tang was educated at home and
while he speaks but little English he
is said to he in thorough sympathy
with the policy of adopting Western
Ideas.
ENGLISH BID FOR CONTEST
Offer of £5,000 and Half the Gate
Receipts.
London, Aug. 14.—An offer of
purse of £f»,000 and half the gate re
ceipts has been cabled to Jack John
son and James J. Jeffries to fight In
London. The syndicate backing the
scheme is the same one that recently
pulled off the Britt-Summors fight.
The idea ie to hold the contest at the
Stadium or elsewhere In the open air.
STRIKER KILLS TWO PERSONS
Tragedy at Bisbee, Ariz., Outcome «f
Labor Troubles.
Bisbee, Ariz., Aug. 14.—William
Pfankueh, a striking printer, shot and
(Instantly killed Asa A. Hoy, former
business manager of the Review, a
morning paper of this city, and Will
iam Rockholz of Covington, Ky. Tin
ion printers on the Review struck
several days ago and Hoy and Bock
liols were operating the linotype ma
chines In their placea
HADISON, SOT'TIT DAKOTA, SATI'RDAV, AtWST 14, 1909
I lived in Iowa 38 years and have made twice
as much money here in four years as I did 111
Iowa during that time.
S0i 1) 10 THi
MM* Of Laflin-Rand Company
Disposed Of.
Kenosha, Wis., Aug. 14.—DeedB and
mortgager- have been filed here which
disclose that the powder mills of the
Lnflin-Tland com jinny, located In all
parts of the United States, have been
sold to the powder trust for a con
sideration of approximately $2,200,000.
The plants included in the sale are
those at Pleasant Prairie and Platte
tille, In Wisconsin the Fontanel and
Dorner plants, in Indiana the Colum
bus and Pennsylvania mills, In Kan
sas the Haskell and Wayne milK In
New Jersey the Empire and Shagltl
coko mills, In New York, and the Ne
mours mills, in West Virginia. The
transfer Is made to the E. 1. Dupont
de Nemours company of New Jersey.
MARLB0R0UGHS TO MAKE UP
May Become Reconciled Through In
tervention of Friends.
London, Aug. 14.—It Is rumored
that the Duke and Duchess of Marl
borough are about to become recon
ciled, owing to the intervention oi
friends, among whom Mrs. Anthony
Drexel Is prominently mentioned.
The reunion, should It bo effected,
will not come as a surprise, as it lias
PUCHES8 OF MARLBOROUGH.
been noticed that the duke und duch
ess have been meeting lately more
frequently than would seem likely In
a case of continued estrangement.
The duchess now is at her country
place in Devonshire, In which county
Ute duko 1b said to be visiting.
Jack Johnson Fined 918.
Chicago, Aug. 14.—Jack Johnson,
heavyweight pugilist champion of the
world, was fined |15 and costs fr,r
exceeding the municipal ppeed limit
In his automobile. Johnson insisted
that his raidd pace was due to a de
sire to catch a train and was not due
to a racing spirit.
Due to Dorr.estlc Troubles.
Philadelphia, Aug. 14.—Failing to
gain a reconciliation with hiR wife
from whom he had been separated,
Daniel W. Smith, aged thirty-five
years, shot and killed her and then
turned tho weapon upon himself. From
the self-inflicted injuries 4M ifawtr
ly afterward.
US*-:
WHY WORK FOR SOMEBODY ELSE
Milestone, Saskatchewan, April 1,1901
Gentlemen:—
I have lived her 2 on the same farm four years
and expect to stay here as long as I am a tiller of
thesoil. I started very cautiously, buying only
160 acres, but as my taith in the country and my
money increased I bought more land, till now I
have 960 acres, and the end is not yet. I bought
160 acres at $17.50 per acre. Broke 120 acres
and seeded to flax, which made 2,400 bushels and
sold the flax at $1.23 per bushel. Thus the first
crop on 120 acres paying for the 160 acres and
leaving a balance of $150.00. Even better than
this has been done repeatedly. My crops have
averaged about $18.00 per acre for the four
years (each year).
Yours truly,
J. J. Courtney.
Do you know that you can buy a good farm at $3.75 per acre, balance in five equal yearly
payments, in other words, just what your rent will cost you in other places.
CONGRESS ASKED TO
ASSIST IRRIGATION
Ten Million a Year for Ten
•fears Requested.
Spokane, Wash., Aug. 14.—An an
nual appropriation of $10,0»'K),(H)0 f°r
period of five years to aid in irriga
tion work Is asked of congresa In res
olutions adopted by the National Irri
gation congress. This Is perhaps the
most important recommendation in
the resolutions adopted. Among the
other resolutions made were the fol
lowing:
That homesteaders under a govern
ment project shall not be required to
establish a residence before the gov
ernment Ig prepared to furnish him
with water.
That the government take meas
ures to drain swamp lands In aid of
land reclamation and of public health.
That the irrigation congress aid
with other conservation organizations
to bring about waterways Improve
ments, reforestation and other like
projects.
That the states pass laws regulat
ing cutting of public and private tim
ber.
That the Mississippi deep waterway
be developed.
The committee turned down thf
resolution asking a $5,000,000,000 bond
issue after a hot debate In which some
of the Washington delegation upheld
the measure.
No hint of the Uallinger-Pinchot
difficulty came up in committer.
JOINT NAVAL DEMONSTRATION
Protecting Powers Sending Warships
to Crete.
Malta, Aug. 14.—The British battle
ship Swift Sure has left here for the
inland of Crete. It is understood that
the other protecting powers, Russia,
Italy and France, will also send war
ships to Crete as an intimation to the
islanders that the powers are re
solved to enforce respect for the rights
of Turkey.
MOTHER AND CHILD KILLED
Panic Stricken by Fire Woman Jumpt
From Window.
New York, Aug. 11.—Mrs. Esthei
Schwermer, with her daughter Eva
four years old, In her arms, Jumped
from a window of their apartment in
Attorney street and both were In
stantly killed. Mrs. Rchwermer was
panic strleken by a small fire on the
third floor of the tenement building.
DROWNED WHILE FISHING
Illinois Jurist and Daughter Lose
Lives In Minnesota.
Park Rapids, Minn., Aug. 14.—Judge
S. F. P.utey of Urbana, 111., and his
daughter, Miss Anna MeClain, were
drowned In tho middle of Mantrap
lake while fishing.
On account of the absence of poles
and lines, one of which was later re
covered hooked in reeds at the far
end of the lake, it is believed that
they had caught a fish, which en
twined their lines, to dlsentang'
which they mo\ „d ahM* fcferif tea
capsizing It
s 1
For further information call on
J. McDONALD
At the Chicago 5c and 10c Store,
Madison, S. D., or write to
J. E. MARTIN LAND CO.. Ltd.
BTfrc.,
MEMBER OP
id
ex in Mr
WHONfST CQNCRtTE
W. G. MARQUART,
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
Pruidp#
—the
DR. H. P. GULSTINE,
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Peter Marquart & Son
Cement Walk*,
Foundations, Bridget,
Culverts, anything
and everything
in
Guaranteed
Construction.
K=XSEE=I
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
Madison State Bank
MADISON, S.
Phone Grecn 263
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
...DENTIST^
•HONE 293
Office ever The Bit Store MADISON, S. DAk
SIMPLE REMEDY FOR LA GRIPPE
La Grippe coughs are dangerous as
they frequently develop into pneumonia
Foley's Honey and Tar not only stops
the cough but heals and strengthens
the lungs so that no serious results need
be feared. The genuine Foley's Hone)
and Tar contains no hsrmfui drugs and
is in s yellow package, ftefaso
tutes.—J. H. And«r«nn.
Mr. F. G. Frttts, Oneonta, N. Y
writes: "My little gi'l was greatly ben
etitted by taking Foley's Orino Laxa
tive, and I hiuk it is the beet remedy
for constiprtion and liver trouble."
Foley's Oriuo Laxative is best for women
and children, as it is mild, pleasant sod
effective, and is a splendid spring medi
cine, as it cleanses the svstem snd
clears tha oompleotioa.—J. H. Anders—
£t~ KENNEDY*
Vies President
FOLEYSHONET^EAR
Cures Col*«« Pmv*nti Pneumonia
E. J. COSTELLO
UNDERTAKER and EMBALMED
Caskets and Funeral Supplies
Calls Answered Day or Night
Phone 114 MADISON, S. D.
McDANlEL & TRIMMER
CONSULTING CIVIL ENGINEERS
i
r\
4
I
*3
'v.*
3
v
Special Atteatioa Give* to
'X '.'v
Land Drainage and Surveys
CHAS. A. TRIMMER, MADISON, S.D.
Offhx witfcf. 6.M
f£ v, -V ..4 **A
i

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