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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 25, 1909, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-08-25/ed-1/seq-6/

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Bottled Only at the
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St. Louis, U. S. A.
CORKED OR WITH CROWN CAPS
MacVeaflh Wants World's Na
tions to Adopt Uniform System.
SAME COLOR FOB SAME VALUE
Smaller Paper Bills, Alika In Tint and
Deaign, to Be Tried In United States.
8ecretary of Treasury Wants an In
ternational Conference to Take Up
the Project.
Secretary of tht Treararjr Franklin
l(acVeii£li. now al his summer Lome
ID Dublin. N. II., has a big scheme for
reformation of the currency, particu
larly paper money. When he returns
to Washington he wilt make an effort
t9 have the representative financiers
•fed statesmen of other nations meet
•rid discuss for the first time a plan
for the uniform kIzo, color and denom
ination of the currency.
"Money goes everywhere," said Sec
retary MacVeagh, as he sat at hi#
Work in his study. "A nation is
known first by Its currency. The
German, the Frenchman, the English
man, the Spaniard, even the poor sav
•ge, may know little of the United
States, but he may often see and han
dle Its money. And he will judge by
Its money to a great extent. Any one
merely looking at a French note would
Immediately conclude that the French
are a highly artistic and civilized na
tion. Glancing at a five pound note,
•gain, the observer may easily see
tat
the British nation Is not in the
n of the artistic countries, for the
Opmmonplace design gives her away
"JfnmedinuMy.
"I want America to follow the mod
el
of France and giVKi her best work
to her paper money, that the world
may know that we have artists, that
we know art, that w* appreciate It
and that we value it
Big 8uccess In Philippines.
"Some time ago we got out sotnc
Hew paper money for use in the Phil
ippine Islands. The size was. as an
experiment, a new one. It took about
tliree-quartcrs of an Inch off the Ions
4tige and about an inch and three
quarters off the short edge of the pres
ent bills. The success of the bll!s
#as amazing. The natives were great
pleased, and the treasury depart
ment was uuanlmously complimented
fcy Americans, who found the bills su
perior In a vast degree to those In
present use In the mother country,
i: "Ueducing the size of the paper cur
rency means a saving for the United
States treasury. The present adrnluis-.
•ration is making an effort at judicious
«nd justified economy. Economy Is the
watchword in Washington, and I am
determined to see that there Is bo
'waste in the department with which I
§fave been intrusted. In my new
m~ V-V {„»}. •, 'S
0fraafc^iS« *••».« —rv-sa. ,/
^•v'^fjM|.
ib Av if k' vf^* -L,
1 (V
Qjtidweiser s a ^'^QTido*
Our Inherited Love of Mother Nature
Has bred within our blood and bone the strength tucttkc us a luUm oi conquerors and
the leaders of the world's civilization.
From the dawn of spring until did Jack Frost first covers our land there will be
thousands of camps pitched along the pine-clad rivers and lakes of our beloved country.
No camping outfit is complete without a case or two of good old
Budweiser
I ue iving of AH Bottled Beers
This matchless brew holds in living life the juices of the best barley grown in America,
and the fragrance and tonic powers of the finest Saazer hops grown in Bohemia.
The Most Popular Beer in the World
scheme I shall recommend new
signs—that is, the designs at present
on our I.ills are, of course, too large
and unwieldy for the more graceful
small bills. That means new designs.
Uniform Bill Portraits.
"Then I want the portraits to be uni
form. Every note of a certain denomi
nation shall have a certain portrait on
it, no matter whether the note Is na
tional or bank currency. Thus when
the portrait of Grovcr Cleveland -a
beautiful Innovation of Mr. Cortelyou
is seen every one will instantly know
that the note Is a ten dollar one, noth
ing else.
"A certain color should also indicate
the denomination of a note. Thus
green might always Indicate to a per
son unable to read that the note is a
dollar note red, a two dollar blue, a
Ave dollar, and so on, whatever the
color might be. Another scheme we
are now using at Washington is to
launder the old bills that come in In
stead of destroying them, as hitherto.
The 'laundry' system will enable the
government to keep Infinitely more
new bills in circulation and will make
'the green rag' a thing of the past.
This is an advantage which scientists,
physicians, hyglenlsts and thinking
people everywhere will recognize.
Uniform Currency.
"Above all these changes and Im
provements I am dreaming—and It will
not be long a dream—of having the
big men of the countries of the earth
meet in an International congress to
adopt for the benefit of humanity In
general a new and uniform system of
money. This must at present extend
only to the size and color of the mon
ey. The various standards of money
make anything more seem merely chi
merical.
"At present we will begin with our
own country. Ilaving shown the oth
ers what wo can do with uniform cur
rency, they will perhaps see the wis
dom of our plan and gladly cewKMrt to
an International conference."
Lemons Without Tree*.
Vegetable lemons are the latest thing
In the fruit (or should it be the vegeta
ble?) line. L. J. Schlorff of 1327 Mon
roe avenue. Kansas City, bought some
seeds last spring at a Kansas City
seed store. lie was told that they
would produce vegetable lemons, good
for making lemonade or for preserves.
Mr. Schlorff planted tae seeds, and
two vines which bear nine of the freak
vegetables are the result The vines
resemble those of the cantaloupe, and
the vegetables also look like canta
loupes. They are a little larger than
the ordinary lemon. They have the
v"r of that frul^.
Secured Many Notes and Bonds.
Jackson, Mich., Aug. 24.—The safe
in the hardware store of Godfrey &
Vervalin, in the village of Para, ten
miles west or this city, was wrecked
by burglart- Farmers' notes for $3,
500 were secured, aUo stocks and
bonds to the value of levera! tkon
sand doliara.
(f^i
••''A','
*1
J. S. MURPHY,
Distributor
Madison, s. B»
MASTER BAKERS IN SESSION
Thousand Delegates Attend Conven
tion at Minneapolis.
Minneapolis, Aug. 25.—President
Bmon Hubig of Cincinnati, in his ad
dress opening the convention of the
National Association of Master Ba
kers, approved everything the pure
food bureau of the department of ag
riculture had done In reference to the
use of benzoate ot soda and preserva
tives. Nearly 1,000 delegates are In
attendance.
Two propositions to be considered
arc to make loaves of bread weighing
twenty-two ounces to be sold for 8
cents the country over and to form an
auxiliary organization for the pur
chase of Hour in large quaitlties.
MENACE IN MAGAliraca.
Editor Thinks Constant Reading of
Them Will Harm Americans.
Frank Chapin Bray, editor of the
Chautauqua Magazine, In a recent ad
dress at Chautauqua, N. Y., said:
"There is a menace in the maga
zines. The magazine habit may be
come as had as the morphine habit.
Mere desultory reading of magazines
may result in a loss of the power to
select good reading and to think about
it intelligently.
"Carolyn Wells has aptly defined a
magazine n«i a small body of literature
entirely surrounded by advertisements.
Some magazines are playing the ad
vertising game to such an extent that
their productions seem to be made up
of anything that will hold the adver
tising and support a picture of a
vaudeville actress on the cover. There
are notable exceptions, however. In
many cases one magazine one month
Is so like another magazine for an
other month that they are practically
Indistinguishable.
"Careless reading of the magazines
will make us as a nation more hyster
terical than ever before and worse
than the French in not having a back
ground of steadiness and a sense of
proportions. Wc shall lose our power
of thinking."
FARM FOR SHORT SERMONS.
Indiana Clergyman Given Valuable
Land For Concise Preaching.
The Rev. J. M. Williams, a Metho
dist minister at Pine Village, Ind., re
ceived a deed recently for sixty acres
of land worth $125 an acre from Mr.
and Mrs* Rnrgoyne Davis because he
preached short sermons while pastor
of the church which they attended.
Mr. Davis is wealthy and was so im
pressed with the brevity and pointed
cess of the sermons of Mr. Williams
that he determined to make him inde
pendent. The deed specifies the brev
ity of Williams' discourses as the con
sideration received for the land. The
sixty acres comprise one of the most
fertile tracts of land Ia
cenntjr.
Johnson Begins Training.
San Franciaco, Aug. 25.—Jack John
son. toting the heavyweight champk n
ship of the world, a broad smile a.,.!
con.-.iderable surplus poundage, hi
staited training for his fight of O
12 with Stanley Ketchel. Johns n
gave his weight as 235 pounds.
wants to scale at 210 in'the mill Wi n
the Michigan "assassin."
Craah May Be Fatal to Two.
Beaver Creek, Minn., Aug. 25.—IV
nest Haanian was killed when t!
threshing engine he was runnin
crashed through a bridge six mil
west of here and Ed Reno, a farmer
who was acting as fireman, was prob
ably fatally injured.
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICtS
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Aug. 24.—Wheat
Sept., 95%c Dec., 93'Hic May, 97"..
7%e. On track—No. 1 hard, J!
01% @1.02% No. 1 Northern, fl.0C,r*s
@1.01% No. 2 Northern. 97%@J9%e
No. 3 Northern, 95%(ft96%c.
8t. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St Paul, Aug. 24.—Cattle—Good to
choice steers, $6.00® 6.75 fair to good
fr).onf?T,.:)Qpt good to choice cows ami
heifers, $4.25f£5.25 veals, $5.50^6.:*
Hops—$7.f»0(fi 7.90. Sheep—Wether
|[email protected] yearlings, [email protected]
lambs, $5.00 0 6.50 spring lambs,
|6.00©7.35
Duluth Wheat and Plax.
Duluth, Aug. 24.—Wheat—On tra k
—No. 1 hard, $1.0314 No. 1 Northern,
fl.Olty No. 2 Northern, 99%c. To
arrive—No. I Northern, 98^4 e No. 2
Northern, 96«4c Sept., 96%c OM..
95V4c Dec.. 93%c May, 97%c. Fhiv
—To arrive and on track, $1.45 Sept
$1.37% Oct.. $1.24% Nov., $1.34Vt
Dec., tl.ao^i May, $1.36.
Chicago Grain and Provl
Chicago, Aug. 24.—Wheat—Sept..
97%@97*ic Dec., [email protected]^c May,
98?!»8Mc. Corn—Sept., [email protected]%
Dec.. 56%c May, 57%c. Oats—Sept
86V4f?36%c Dec., 3«%e May, 39-%c
Pork—Sept., $22.40 Oct., $21.05 Jan..
$17 fi5. Butter—Creameries, 24firT 2S":
dairies, 21*4£?25c. Eggs—18Tr21V
Poultry Turkeys, 15c chickens.
14%c springs, 18c,
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago, Aug. 24.—Cattle—Beeves,
$4.40#7.K5 Texas -rs, $4.00(7/ f.1
Western steer3, $4.40^ 6.40 stockf
and feeders, $3.15.25 cows an 1
heifers. $2.25(ft t',.49 calves, $6.00'
8.50. Hogf—Light, 8.20 mixed.
$7.f)0(fi S.2"» heavy, !.
For sale by all dealers. Price
cents. Foster-Milbnrn Co., BoffaL
New York, sole agents for the United
States.
Ken 1 em her the came—Doan's—and
take 110 other.
ELY'S CREAM BALM
Sure to Civ« Satisfaction.
GIVES RELIEF AT ONCE.
ItcleRnsos, soothes, lieals and protects tVc
lisens 'tl lueiitbrttne resulting from Ciitan
md drivesuw iy ft Cold in the Head quickly.
Kestures the Senses of Taste and Hmeii.
to use. Contains no injurious drugs
Applied into the nostrils and absorbed,
[.urge Size, r) cento at Druggists or by
ai-iit.
Liquid Cream Balm for
Atomizers, 75 cents.
S9SS
2Mi
8.25 rouph.
$7.20fci7.50 good to choice heav
$7.50(fx8.25, pigs, $7.00^8.00. She.
—Native. $'/.7T7 4 fi": yearlings, $4. i'»
fj'tfiu: lambs, $4 J,./7.78.
MOTHErSGRATlTOM
Many a Mother in Madison
Will Appreciate the
Following.
Many a strong man and many
healthy woman has much for which
thank mother. The care taken durin
their childhood brought them p««t
the danger point and made them
healthy men and women. Children
are generally bothered at some period
with incontinence of urine, and in.
hility to retain it is ofttimes called u
hanit. It is not the children's fanl!
the difficulty lies in the kidneys,
and can be readily righted if taken in
the proper way. A Madison mother
shows you how.
2 Mrs. Fred Warner, formerly living
on South Eighth street, Madison, S.D
»ayo: "Five years ago my little bov
suflered from a weakness of the ki 1
nevs. He became very restless and
often complained of his hack paining
him severely. He seemed to have im
control over the kidney secretion.-,
especially during the night. Not long
ago my daughter also began to Bnfler
from a similar complaint and as I had
seen Doan's Kidnej Pills highly re
commended, I decided to give them a
trial. I procured a box at And«r
son's drug store and the leenlts were
so gratifying that I procured a fur
ther supply. Today my daughter i
completely cursd and my son is stead
ily improving."
Tine
New business written
Income
Paid policy holders
in
fur B8PJHF.RS. 56 Warm St. Ms« Y*ft
5
ADMITTED ASSET8
Total phid to policy holders
Insurance in force
OFFICERS.
L. K. Thompson, Prea.
W. J. Urrham, Vice Poes. and^Actuaryj
George E. Towle, Treas.
Rolert E. Efterly, Sec.
John T. Baxter, Cxmnci].
Henry W. Cook, Medical Director,
F. M. Stickney, Cashi(ff.
H. F. White, Auditor.
Edgar F. Eshbaugh, Agency Director
F. Ball, District Manager
F- C- Stoltzman and S. G. Westaby Solicitors
MADISON CEMENT CO.
J. S. Thompson & Son, Prop.
Sidewalk Workers and
all Kinds of Cement Work
Phone Red-450
Dr.
J. GALLAGHER
...Graduated Veterinarian
DENTISTRY and SURGERY
A Specialty
Office and Hospital, Corner Harih
Ave. and Third Street.
MADISON V go. DAK.
ALL WEALTH
and the demand for Lake County farms is increasing. If you
are in search of a
Home in a Good Climate
where you can raise Wheat, Oats Barley Cor*t "Potatoes and in
fact everytbicg adapted to this latiturif) and where
you can successfully carry on
Dairying &
and where your lamily will have the advantages of
GOOD SOCIETY GOOD SCHOOLS
GOOD CHURCH FACILITIES
Then come and see me, and I will show *ou just what you want
If you are rentir e land now, paying $3 to $5 annual
rental, I wih si-ow yuu iust as good land and sell
it to you at what you will pay out in rental
where you are in three ye^rs, and
will gn e you easy terms ot payment
If you want a good 3c cation in Madison
I
iar^e number c1 substantial buildings have been built
in Madison t) pert, reason and thn ciV7 is steadily
growing in population.
Corn porsdence Solicited
Chas. Kennedy
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA,
Established 1S"» OLD LINK Puiv|v Mutual
Northwestern National Life Insurance Company,
A WESTEBN COMPAMY MinflCapOllS. |.'OB WESTERN PEOPLU
K Ki iiMJ8
$5,2f0,000 Insurance gun written
l,ii)0,000 Gain in assets
ft)0,000 Gain in Surplus
January 1,1909.
The Northwestern Lift' issues all tlie latest and most improved forms of policies, and in any amniountf
desired. It invests its income for the upbuilding of the territory in which it operates, and hae loaned to
the farmers of Minnesota, Iowa, North ami South Dakota over $.'i,rOo,00Q.
have such for von.
DIRECTORS
F. A. Chamlx'rlain, Pres. Security Hank.
E. \V. Dwker, V. Pres. Northwestern I'ank
C. F. JafTray, V. Pres. First National ISunk.
A. A. Crane, V. Pres. Northwestern NationarBank,
B. F. Nelson, Nelson-Tuthill Lumber Co.
L. K. Thompson, Pres. and General Mgr.
George E. Towle, Treas.
W. J. Graham, Actuary.
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO.
MILWAUKEE BEER
on draught at
FRED KURTH'S,
J. S. MURPHY,
PETER HEAGNEV
Prioate stock, Wiener style, Bottle beer
at all Leading Saloons in the oitjr.
L. J. AHMANN, Agent.
iWo,ooc
450.000
50,K0
I 5,700,000
S,roo,ooo
S^ooo ooo
Sioux Falls, S. D.
Madison, S D.
Madison, S. D.

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